June 27, 2017
Toronto, ON

Tuesday, June 27, 2017

 

 
8:00 AM — 3:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Courtyard Foyer

 

 
 

 
8:30 — 9:30 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Courtyard Foyer

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 


 
9:30 — 9:45 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Courtyard A&B

 
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 


 
9:45 — 10:30 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Courtyard A&B

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Sara Johnson
Senior Research Director,
Global Economics,
IHS Markit

 
10:30 — 11:00 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Courtyard Foyer

 
 

 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 

WHAT THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK MEANS FOR SHIPPERS, CARRIERS AND SERVICE PROVIDERS

Location: Courtyard A&B

As the Canadian economy recovers, beneficial cargo owners and the transportation and warehouse providers they serve must not just prepare for growth but also for a changing landscape. Statistics Canada, for example, reported fourth-quarter 2016 GDP growth of 2.6 percent, beating the consensus economist estimates of 2 percent, and far exceeding Bank of Canada’s most recent forecast, in January, of 1.5 percent. Solid exports of goods and services, strong household consumption and a brisk pace of residential construction and renovation drove the growth. Early 2017 indications point to sustained growth, with IHS Markit forecasting 2.3 percent growth for the full year.Rising industrial real estate costs near ports, e-commerce demand and higher trucking rates are coming at beneficial cargo owners fast -- even if their transportation spend budgets aren’t keeping up. Major freight stakeholders will discuss how they see the economy faring, how technology can mitigate pinch points and what strategies are helping them balance growth with reliability in an environment of volatility.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Sara Johnson
Senior Research Director,
Global Economics,
IHS Markit

 

Keith Reardon
Vice President,
Intermodal and Automotive,
CN Railway

 

Najim Shaikh
Vice President, Commercial Import,
Mediterranean Shipping Co. (Canada) Inc.

 

Maksim Mihic
General Manager,
DP World (Canada)

 

Gary Fast
Associate Vice President,
Domestic Transportation Operations,
Canadian Tire

 
12:00 — 1:15 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Alexander

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 


 
1:15 — 2:15 PM
 

CANADIAN CUSTOMS: THE LONG ROAD TO MORE EFFICIENT CARGO CLEARANCE

Location: Courtyard A&B

As they grapple with cargo clearance bottlenecks, forwarders are pressuring the Canada Border Services Agency to speed up examinations and divulge the costs of the cargo checks. But that’s just the tip of it. Canada is in the early innings in reworking its system of cargo clearance to allow containerized goods that don’t present a security, safety or health threat to move through ports and separate the payment of duties from the process so importers can get their goods out of the terminals faster. Until then, however, forwarders — and their BCO customers — must wrestle with frequent cargo-clearance delays. This session will examine the issues freight stakeholders are confronting with Canada’s new eManifest regulation — which promised to expose BCOs to fines and penalties in January, but has been marked by delays — and other cargo-clearance and regulatory challenges.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Joy Nott
President,
Canadian Importers and Exporters Association

 

Ruth Snowden
Executive Director,
Canadian International Freight
Forwarders Association

 
2:15 — 3:15 PM
 

PORT PERSPECTIVES: A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH CANADA’S CONTAINER PORT LEADERS

Location: Courtyard A&B
On the strength of the economy, containerized shipping volumes moving through Canadian ports increased 4.6 percent last year, led by an almost 11 percent increase at Halifax and 3 percent gain at Prince Rupert, although volumes were essentially flat through Vancouver and Montreal, according to The Journal of Commerce’s ranking of Top 25 North American ports. But growth in containerized volumes is only one of the changing dynamics transforming ports on both coasts, with new vessel-sharing alliances and major expansion projects at Montreal, Prince Rupert, and Vancouver putting additional pressure on ports and terminal operators to deliver service quality to beneficial cargo owners. At the same time, ports must help shape road and highway infrastructure enhancements in a tight fiscal environment and upgrade their technology. Those changes, coupled with BCOs’ increased demand for reliability, provide ports with a challenge and opportunity to strengthen the Canadian containerized supply chain for the short and long-term. This roundtable-type discussion will gauge how Canada’s major ports are addressing today’s supply chain challenges, how they’re planning for the future, and what they’re doing to improve service to BCOs.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, West Coast,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Paul DuVoisin
Vice President, Commercial,
Halifax Port Authority

 

Jim Quinn
President and CEO,
Port Saint John

 

Shaun Stevenson
Vice President,
Trade Development and Public Affairs,
Port of Prince Rupert

 

Daniel Dagenais
Vice President, Operations,
Port of Montreal

 
3:15 — 3:45 PM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Courtyard Foyer

 
 

 
3:45 — 4:45 PM
 

THE LONG LAST MILE: HOW BCOS CAN MITIGATE RISING WAREHOUSE AND INLAND TRANSPORTATION COSTS

Location: Courtyard A&B

Containerized shippers may be seeing business pick up as the economy stabilizes, but industrial real estate rates have soared, too. Shippers are paying approximately 20 percent more on rent than they did last year as space tightens, according to industrial real estate services company Jones Lang LaSalle. Vacancy rates in the Montreal areas hit record lows last year and space tightening around Vancouver is showing no signs of relenting. At the same time, shippers are under pressure to reduce their surface transportation costs, spurring some to look for matchback opportunities and even the use of 60-foot containers. This session will explore the dynamics within the surface transportation and real estate markets, and look at how beneficial cargo owners can mitigate price increases without sacrificing inland reliability.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Jonathan Wahba
Vice President,
Sales and Marketing-Intermodal and Grain,
Canadian Pacific Railway

 

Steve Banks
Vice President,
Triskele Logistics

 

Adam Sherriff-Scott
Senior Vice President,
Industrial Real Estate, JLL

 
4:45 PM
 

CLOSING REMARKS

Location: Courtyard A&B

   

 
4:45 — 6:00 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: Courtyard Foyer

   

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.