May 14 - 16, 2017
Houston, TX

Monday, May 15, 2017

 

 
7:30 AM — 4:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 
8:00 — 8:45 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 
8:45 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: TBD

 
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: TBD

 
 

 
9:45 — 10:45 AM
 

GULF CONTAINER SHIPPING OUTLOOK: WHAT SHIPPERS SHOULD EXPECT IN THE SECOND HALF OF 2017 AND BEYOND

Location: TBD

Many shippers are starting to worry that increased resin exports will constrain already-tight capacity on container services at Gulf ports. Though vessel sizes have been increasing at Gulf ports, average capacities in the 4,000-6,000-TEU range remain about half of the 8,000-14,000-TEU vessels calling West and East coast ports. But with some of the world’s largest ocean carriers, including Maersk Line, Mediterranean Shipping Co., CMA CGM and Cosco launching new services into the region over the past year, and with the fallout of the severe disruption tied to West Coast disruption during longshore labor talks in 2014-2015, Gulf ports are increasing their share of Asia-origin goods moving into the US. The Panama Canal expansion has created possibilities for larger ships on all-water Asia services to the Gulf. In short, BCOs have more options than ever to use Houston, Mobile, New Orleans and other Gulf ports. With that as the backdrop, this opening panel will analyze the outlook for container shipping through the Gulf, current and future container services in this era of mega-ships and -alliances, import-export imbalances and how Gulf ports aim to close the gap, the outlook for rates, and what shippers need to know as they plan their supply chains.

 
— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Mario Moreno
Senior Economist,
IHS Markit

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: TBD

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

SHIPPER-CARRIER RELATIONSHIPS: HOW SERVICE PROVIDERS AND THEIR CUSTOMERS ARE MANAGING A SEA OF DISRUPTION

Location: TBD

With Gulf shipping interests still digesting disruptive forces that include unprecedented consolidation, the UK’s vote to exit the European Union, and a transformative US presidential election — all of which will ripple through global supply chains for the foreseeable future, how are carriers and their Gulf Coast customers going about strengthening their ties? On the consolidation front alone, the shuffling of alliances that came after Hanjin Shipping’s stunning collapse last August and culminated with Maersk Line’s late-2016 acquisition of Hamburg Sud will have particular impact on container shipping services through the Gulf. What impact will the Trump administration’s promises to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, while taking a much more protectionist stance on free trade in general, impact volumes moving through the Gulf and supply chains in general? With the International Longshoremen’s Association set to begin new contract talks by the end of the year, are carriers and shippers optimistic that a contract can be reached without the disruption seen in 2013-2014? What plans are they making now to avoid potential disruption? These and other potential threats only exacerbate relationships that have grown more complicated in recent years. In this engaging roundtable discussion, a panel of carriers and shippers will discuss the year ahead, life under Trump, the increasing threat of supply chain disruption related to industry-driven actions and more stringent regulation, and what they’re doing to improve their relationships.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
12:15 — 1:30 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: TBD

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

US-MEXICO TRADE:
MAKING NAFTA WORK BETTER FOR THE SHIPPER

Location: TBD

Amid the rhetoric over rebooting NAFTA and even building a wall between US-Mexico, shippers and their transportation providers are barreling ahead by expanding cross-border truck networks and introducing new intermodal rail services. There’s plenty of non-political headwinds, though, from rising fuel prices on both sides of the border to a weak peso. Equipment shortages are only getting worse and Customs cargo clearance still isn’t where it needs to be. Get past the NAFTA scaremongering headlines to understand how cross-border networks are morphing and what shippers and BCOs can do to guarantee more reliable, and possibly, cheaper transport.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Brenda Mainwaring
Vice President,
Public Affairs,
Union Pacific

 

Daniel Cullen
Director,
Applied Knowledge,
Breakthrough Fuel LLC

 

Jordan Dewart
President,
Yusen Logistics (Mexico) SA de CV

 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

INTERMODAL RAIL:
WILL GULF SERVICES MEET SHIPPER NEEDS?

Location: TBD

US intermodal rail services are gaining traction at Gulf ports but most intermodal traffic still moves east-west. The Gulf Coast is served by more railroads than any other US coast — New Orleans is the only US port served by six Class 1 lines. CN Railway is partnering with New Orleans and Mobile to connect those ports and their new intermodal yards to the mid-South and Midwest. BNSF Railway has intermodal service between Houston and Dallas-Fort Worth. Rapidly growing petrochemical shipments promise to provide growth for railroads serving the region’s ports. How does this match up with shipper needs? Can railroads handle increased resin shipments efficiently and without supply chain problems for shippers of other cargoes? What’s the potential for intermodal rail service at Gulf ports, and what are the challenges? Where are rail operators directing their investment? How do intermodal services mesh with ocean carrier services? Where are the pinch points for road and rail services, and what’s being done to ease them? This panel of analysts, rail operators and shippers will address these questions and discuss the outlook for intermodal service to the region.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 

 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: TBD

 
 

 
4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

BREAKBULK AND HEAVY-LIFT OUTLOOK:
ANALYZING A CHANGING MARKET BREAKBULK AND HEAVY-LIFT OUTLOOK: A CHANGING MARKET

Location: TBD

The Gulf Coast is the pre-eminent US port range for breakbulk and project cargoes. Houston, the nation’s energy capital, is the hub for engineering, procurement and construction companies. Ports from Brownsville to Port Manatee handle project shipments, in addition to traditional breakbulk cargoes such as steel, aluminum, rubber and forest products. Like their container shipping cousins, breakbulk and heavy-lift operators have been fighting an extended downturn driven by overcapacity and middling demand that has affected ports, terminals and logistics providers. That may be changing. In its January Multipurpose Shipping Market Review and Forecaster report, Drewry Maritime Research said dry cargo demand is weak but strengthening, while scrapping rates are rising and new vessel orders have slowed. Some industry leaders and analysts, including Drewry, say supply and demand could come closer into balance by later this year. This panel will discuss how companies are preparing for the market recovery, and how increased modularization of high-value project shipments is influencing port and carrier selection, insurance requirements, and relationships among supply chain partners.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Edwin Bastian
Global Sales Director,
BBC Chartering USA

 

Dennis Devlin
Senior Director and
Head of North American Business Development,
Global Oil & Gas Projects,
DB Schenker

 

Jake Swanson
Global Logistics Director,
CB&I’s Engineering and Construction Group

 
5:00 — 6:30 PM
 

HOSPITALITY RECEPTION

Location: TBD

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.