May 14 - 16, 2017
Houston, TX

Monday, May 15, 2017

 

 
7:30 AM — 6:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Salon F Foyer

 

 
 

 
8:00 — 8:45 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Salon F Foyer

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

sponsor


 
8:45 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Salon F

 
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port Houston

 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Salon F

 
— INTRODUCED BY—
Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER—
Dr. Walter Kemmsies
Managing Director,
Economist and Chief Strategist,
JLL Ports Airports and Global Infrastructure

 


 
9:45 — 10:45 AM
 

GULF CONTAINER SHIPPING OUTLOOK: WHAT SHIPPERS SHOULD EXPECT IN THE SECOND HALF OF 2017 AND BEYOND

Location: Salon F

Many shippers are starting to worry that increased resin exports will constrain already-tight capacity on container services at Gulf ports. Though vessel sizes have been increasing at Gulf ports, average capacities in the 4,000-6,000-TEU range remain about half of the 8,000-14,000-TEU vessels calling West and East coast ports. But with some of the world’s largest ocean carriers, including Maersk Line, Mediterranean Shipping Co., CMA CGM and Cosco launching new services into the region over the past year, and with the fallout of the severe disruption tied to West Coast disruption during longshore labor talks in 2014-2015, Gulf ports are increasing their share of Asia-origin goods moving into the US. The Panama Canal expansion has created possibilities for larger ships on all-water Asia services to the Gulf. In short, BCOs have more options than ever to use Houston, Mobile, New Orleans and other Gulf ports. With that as the backdrop, this opening panel will analyze the outlook for container shipping through the Gulf, current and future container services in this era of mega-ships and -alliances, import-export imbalances and how Gulf ports aim to close the gap, the outlook for rates, and what shippers need to know as they plan their supply chains.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Lori Louviere
Commercial Manager,
Port of New Orleans

 

— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Mario Moreno
Senior Economist,
IHS Markit

 

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Salon F Foyer

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

US-MEXICO TRADE:
MAKING NAFTA WORK BETTER FOR THE SHIPPER

Location: Salon F

Amid the rhetoric over rebooting NAFTA and even building a wall between US-Mexico, shippers and their transportation providers are barreling ahead by expanding cross-border truck networks and introducing new intermodal rail services. There’s plenty of non-political headwinds, though, from rising fuel prices on both sides of the border to a weak peso. Equipment shortages are only getting worse and Customs cargo clearance still isn’t where it needs to be. Get past the NAFTA scaremongering headlines to understand how cross-border networks are morphing and what shippers and BCOs can do to guarantee more reliable, and possibly, cheaper transport.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Brenda Mainwaring
Vice President,
Public Affairs,
Union Pacific

 

Daniel Cullen
Director,
Applied Knowledge,
Breakthrough Fuel LLC

 

Jordan Dewart
President,
Yusen Logistics (Mexico) SA de CV

 

Carlos Godinez
Director,
Mexico,
Celtic International

 
12:15 — 1:45 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Salons G-H

 
 

 
1:45 — 2:30 PM
 

LONGSHORE LABOR WATCH:
WHAT CAN BCOS EXPECT IN THE NEXT ROUND OF ILA BARGAINING?

Location: Salon F

Following difficult negotiations between longshore labor and management in the past two contracting periods that led to disruption on all three US coasts, beneficial cargo owners are monitoring the process more closely than ever. The topic is getting especially close attention as the International Longshoremen’s Association and its employers prepare for coastwide bargaining on a new master contract to replace the one that expires on Sept. 30, 2018. Bargaining on supplementary local contracts already has begun at the district and local level. In this roundtable discussion, leaders of the ILA’s South Atlantic and Gulf District and the West Gulf Maritime Association will discuss the status of negotiations and provide a look at how the ILA and employers have approached this round of bargaining. The discussion will provide a well-rounded understanding of longshore labor-management relations and what’s involved in contract negotiations.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Denson White
APM Terminals Client Services

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Alan Robb
President,
South Atlantic and Gulf District,
International Longshoremen's Association

 

Nathan Wesely
President,
West Gulf Maritime Association

 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

PORT OF MOBILE:
ANALYZING THE ALABAMA PORT’S RISING TIDE

Location: Salon F

The Port of Mobile had big news on March 29, when Wal-Mart announced construction of a 2.6 million-square-foot distribution center near the Alabama port. The new DC is expected to add some 25,000 40-foot-equivalent import units a year to the port’s volume, and could lure additional Asia all-water services to join the three that already serve the port. Mobile’s container terminal, operated by APM Terminals, is being expanded to stay ahead of demand that grew 19 percent in 2016 to 277,302 20-foot-equivalent units, a record year. Canadian National Railway plans to use the port’s intermodal rail terminal, opened in 2016, to develop Mobile as a southern gateway to the US Southeast and Midwest with the idea of potentially replicating its successful model at the Port of Prince Rupert, British Columbia. Mobile also has a thriving breakbulk trade, and is one of the largest steel ports in the US. For shippers considering different US southern gateways, this panel will provide a close look a Mobile as a potential new option and allow for questions.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Howard Finkel
Executive Vice President,
COSCO Shipping Lines (North America) Inc.

 

Brian Harold
Managing Director,
APM Terminals

 

Lonny Kubas
Director of International Marketing,
Intermodal, CN

 
3:30 — 4:00 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Salon F Foyer

 
 

 
4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

BREAKBULK AND HEAVY-LIFT OUTLOOK:
ANALYZING A CHANGING MARKET

Location: Salon F

The Gulf Coast is the pre-eminent US port range for breakbulk and project cargoes. Houston, the nation’s energy capital, is the hub for engineering, procurement and construction companies. Ports from Brownsville to Port Manatee handle project shipments, in addition to traditional breakbulk cargoes such as steel, aluminum, rubber and forest products. Like their container shipping cousins, breakbulk and heavy-lift operators have been fighting an extended downturn driven by overcapacity and middling demand that has affected ports, terminals and logistics providers. That may be changing. In its January Multipurpose Shipping Market Review and Forecaster report, Drewry Maritime Research said dry cargo demand is weak but strengthening, while scrapping rates are rising and new vessel orders have slowed. Some industry leaders and analysts, including Drewry, say supply and demand could come closer into balance by later this year. This panel will discuss how companies are preparing for the market recovery, and how increased modularization of high-value project shipments is influencing port and carrier selection, insurance requirements, and relationships among supply chain partners.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Edwin Bastian
Global Sales Director,
BBC Chartering USA

 

Dennis Devlin
Senior Director and
Head of North American Business Development,
Global Oil & Gas Projects,
DB Schenker

 

Jake Swanson
Global Logistics Director,
CB&I’s Engineering and Construction Group

 

Dennis M. Mottola
Corporate Traffic & Logistics
Process Owner and Manager,
Bechtel Global Logistics

 
5:00 — 6:30 PM
 

HOSPITALITY RECEPTION

Location: Salon F Foyer

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.