May 14 - 16, 2017
Houston, TX

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

 

 
7:30 AM — 4:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Salon F Foyer

 

 
 

 
8:15 — 8:55 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Salon F Foyer

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

sponsor


 
8:55 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Salon F

 
 
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 

 
9:00 — 10:00 AM
 

THE APPROACHING IMPACT OF THE RESINS BOOM ON NON-RESINS SHIPPERS

Location: Salon F

The resins boom already is starting to have collateral impact on non-resins exporters who use Gulf Coast ports and are beginning to experience tightness in container availability as chemical companies’ demand for equipment grows. The impact will be felt more acutely in the fourth quarter of this year when the multibillion-dollar Exxon Mobile Chemical Baytown facility begins generating an estimated 200 containers a day for export through the Port of Houston. And it will become more acute as at least 13 new resins plants come on line throughout the Gulf region in the next 24 to 36 months. Projections are that total resins exports will double from current levels to 1 million TEUs. Such a sustained and elevated demand for limited container supply will be felt by shippers of commodities including cotton, and mid-sized commodity traders, forcing them to re-evaluate their overall supply chains. The import market also will be affected. Compounding the challenge, seasonal shippers like those moving cotton are at a disadvantage in comparison to resin shippers whose volumes are consistent throughout the year.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

 

Richard McDuffie
Chief Operating Officer,
Dunavant Global Logistics Group

 

Neil Woods
Head of Operations,
Americas (Cotton and Coffee),
Engelhart Commodities Trading Partners

 
10:00 — 11:00 AM
 

IMPORTING THROUGH THE GULF: ARE SERVICE PROVIDERS MEETING SHIPPER NEEDS?

Location: Salon F

Cargo at Gulf ports historically has been dominated by exports, but that’s starting to change. Population growth, manufacturing expansion, and problems on other coasts are encouraging growth in containerized imports through the region’s ports. During the last year, carriers have added or expanded all-water services to the Gulf from Asia, and other services are being discussed. It’s still a tough competitive environment, however. Gulf ports must compete with faster transit times for Asian shipments using intermodal routings through West Coast ports, and frequent services and improving rail connections via the South Atlantic. Attracting import cargo to Gulf ports has an important export component: Petrochemical shippers need empty containers to load growing volumes of synthetic resins for export. This panel discussion will feature beneficial cargo owners who will provide insights on cargo demand, port competition, and challenges and opportunities for imports through Gulf ports.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Patrick Poole
Senior Director,
Supply Chain,
Igloo Corp.

 

Darryl Cline
Supply Chain Manager,
FBD Partnership LP

 
11:00 — 11:30 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Salon F Foyer

 
 

 
11:30 AM — 12:30 PM
 

REFRIGERATED CARGO: WHY THIS GULF STAPLE IS ABOUT TO HEAT UP

Location: Salon F

Refrigerated cargo at Gulf ports means more than bananas, which are top commodities at Gulfport, Galveston, and Port Freeport. Poultry, produce and other perishables are important cargoes throughout the region, and ports are gearing up to handle more. Houston is adding perishables warehouses. Gulfport is an emerging perishables transshipment point and has made refrigerated shipments a central port of its post-Katrina rebuilding. Ports such as Tampa and New Orleans also have expanded reefer capacity. How do Gulf ports stack up in competition with perishables import centers on other coasts? What’s driving market trends? How do Gulf ports fit distribution patterns? What are the strategic and operational challenges?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Lara L. Sowinski
Editorial Director,
Food Logistics and
Supply & Demand Chain Executive

 

— PANELISTS —
Jonathan Daniels
Executive Director and CEO,
Mississippi State Port Authority

 

Wade Elliott
Vice President,
Marketing & Business Development,
Port Tampa Bay

 

Jim Henderson
Vice President, Sales and Marketing,
New Orleans Cold Storage

 
12:30 — 1:30 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Salons G-H

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

PORT PERSPECTIVES I: A DISCUSSION WITH THE GULF’S CONTAINER PORT LEADERS

Location: Salon F

Container trade through the Gulf is changing rapidly. The region’s three largest container ports — Houston, New Orleans, and Mobile — are expanding container facilities while continuing to serve breakbulk and project markets. Houston is investing $2 billion to expand facilities and is working with local governments to improve intermodal connectors. New Orleans is updating its master plan to prepare for growth. Proposed distribution centers will cement Mobile’s position as a regular port call for all-water services from Asia. Executives from these ports will provide an unvarnished look at what’s ahead, and will answer questions on how they’ll meet expected challenges and what shippers should expect.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port Houston

 

Brandy Christian
President and CEO,
Port of New Orleans

 

Frank Fogarty
Vice President,
Trade & Development,
Alabama State Port Authority

 
2:30 — 3:15 PM
 

PORT PERSPECTIVES II:
A DISCUSSION WITH LEADERS OF REGIONAL AND SPECIALIZED GULF PORTS

Location: Salon F

Gulf ports defy easy categorization. Unlike container-dominated ports on other coasts, many Gulf ports also handle breakbulk, project and bulk cargoes. Some have developed specialties in forest products, steel, construction materials, bagged food, and other cargoes that don’t necessarily move in containers. What special considerations go into handling these cargoes? What trends are driving these markets? How are these ports investing to maintain or hone their edge in breakbulk/project markets and meet shipper needs? What market challenges and opportunities do they see? Top executives at several ports will offer their perspectives.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Bill Rase
Executive Director,
Port of Lake Charles

 

Eduardo Campirano
Director and CEO,
Port of Brownsville

 

Matty Appice
CPE™,
Chief Commercial Officer,
Port Manatee

 
3:15 — 3:30 PM
 

CLOSING REMARKS

Location: Salon F

 
 

 
3:30 — 5:30 PM
 

ON LOCATION:
AN EXCLUSIVE TOUR FOR GULF SHIPPING CONFERENCE ATTENDEES: KATOEN NATIE HOUSTON POLYMERS TERMINAL

Location: TBD

Katoen Natie’s Houston Polymers Terminal in La Porte is one of the largest resins warehousing and packaging facilities in the region. The state-of-the-art facility features 1.8 million square feet of warehousing space, 24 packaging silos, 320 loading spots, 500 railcar slots and up to 40 bulk transload spots. Antwerp, Belgium-based KTN is one of the world’s largest resins warehousing and packaging companies in the world, with more than 9 million square feet of space in the Houston market alone. Frank Vingerhoets, president of Katoen Natie USA, will lead this tour, offering insight into the US Gulf’s largest growth driver for containerized volumes. Attendees will get an up-close view of resin packaging and its role in the supply chain.

SPACE IS LIMITED -- Registration Inquiries can be made through the JOC Events Help Desk

 
— TOUR HOST—
Curtis Spencer
President,
IMS Worldwide Inc.

 

— TOUR GUIDE—
Frank Vingerhoets
President,
Katoen Natie USA

 


 
3:30 — 5:30 PM
 

SHIPPER ROUNDTABLE

Location: Salon H

A special, off-the-record discussion of the issues dominating the shipping, trucking and intermodal markets in the US Gulf. By Reservation Only for Shippers.

You must be a BCO/Shipper (you must own the goods that are being shipped) in order to take part in this shipper roundtable.

To register please contact:
Mina Patel
Program Planning Specialist,
Maritime & Trade Events
P: +1 516-589-0229
E: mina.patel@ihsmarkit.com

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

sponsor

 

sponsor

 

— ROUNDTABLE LEADERS —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 
 
STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.