September 18 - 20, 2017
Hamburg, Germany

Monday, September 18, 2017

DAY 1 — DRILLING DOWN:
Day 1 of the JOC Container Trade Europe Conference will offer an industry-specific track of concurrent sessions that analyse the unique challenges and issues confronting shippers and service providers — including retail, automotive, chemicals, and forest products. A combination of macroeconomic analysis, exclusive workshops and real-life examples will offer attendees a deep-dive examination of today's challenges and potential solutions from the industry's most authoritative experts. See Statement of JOC Conference Editorial Policy below.

 

 
9:45 AM — 12:30 PM
 

PORT PRODUCTIVITY WORKSHOP
BY RESERVATION ONLY FOR CARRIERS AND TERMINAL OPERATORS

Location: Saal 1 - 2

It is truly the era of the mega-ship — and not the “paltry” 10,000- or 13,000-TEU variety. Vessels of 20,000-plus TEU already are active in the Asia-Europe trade, and more are on the way, pushing second-tier vessels up to 14,000 TEU to the trans-Pacific and other trade lanes. This closed-door, off-the-record workshop for carrier and terminal operating representatives will explore the challenges these massive ships pose to the supply chain, from quayside operations and yard and gate operations, to end-to-end cargo visibility. It will feature a combination of presentations and interactive discussion focusing on improving efficiency through improved carrier-terminal communication, data sharing, and IT best practices — culminating in a JOC whitepaper of the lessons learned, action steps, and potential solutions.

 
— WORKSHOP LEADER —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor, Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 


 
12:00 PM — 5:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Saal 1 - 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 
12:30 — 1:30 PM
 

WELCOME LUNCH

Location: Saal 1 - 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 

 


 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

SESSION I: RETAIL

Location: Saal 1

With the retail sector never as competitive as it is today, the international supply chain is confronting heavy demands to support the pressures retailers face. Given rapid and unpredictable changes in consumer preferences, lead times and transit times are under heavy pressure, with little tolerance for rolling of cargo by ocean carriers, port delays, or inconsistent transit times. That often means finding the right rate level and contract terms that guarantee capacity and allocations and ensure cargoes aren’t subject to discrimination by carriers in transit. It also means finding the right formula regarding origin consolidation, destination deconsolidation, and managing increasingly multi-channel supply chains, while achieving robust visibility that allows for maximum control over cargo in transit.

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

SESSION II: CHEMICALS

Location: Saal 7 - 10

Chemicals customers are highly demanding due to the toxic, dangerous, and heavily regulated nature of their cargoes. The high-volume, non-seasonal nature of their cargo flows requires access to consistent ocean capacity. Their cargo must move under the strictest environmental and safety regulations. They demand error-free compliance with hazardous materials regulations, robust end-to-end cargo visibility, environmental responsibility, and assurance that cargo remains safe and secure throughout transits. Chemical customers seek an ocean network that is integrated into their global networks and sourcing activities directed from headquarters to create global transportation sourcing and execution.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director,
Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Yves Letange
Managing Director,
Europe, Turkey and North Africa,
BDP International NV

 

Rien de Bil
Logistics Procurement Director,
Hexion B.V.

 

Alejandro Parodi
Logistics Procurement Manager-EMEA,
Eastman Chemical Co.

 


 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

SESSION III: PHARMA AND HEALTHCARE

Location: Saal 7 - 10

Pharmaceutical shippers are probably the most demanding ocean shipping customers. Given the unique nature of their product, they have no tolerance or appetite for risk. They tolerate no deviation from internal container temperatures and atmosphere, and demand the highest levels of container security, integrity, and visibility. For years, pharma shippers had such little confidence in ocean shipping that they simply wouldn’t use it. Standards have improved and risk has declined, however, so pharma is a growing segment of business for forwarders and carriers, and that’s allowed shippers to reduce transportation costs substantially. Customers require fully compliant forwarder facilities and equipment, highly trained forwarder staff to ensure end-to-end safety, integrity, and regulatory compliance based on standard operating procedures, and a high degree of confidence in on-time arrival of shipments.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Greg Knowler
Senior Editor, Europe,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Felix Heger
Vice President and Head of
Ocean Freight and China Rail Europe,
DHL Global Forwarding

 

Daniel Piotrowski
Director,
European Reefer Trade,
OOCL (Europe) Ltd

 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

SESSION IV: AUTOMOTIVE

Location: Saal 1

Automotive customers, including Tier 1 suppliers, require a high degree of reliability, especially around transit times and port throughput, to ensure that production delays are avoided consistently. They also require a high degree of visibility, consolidation of products from multiple suppliers, and active, hands-on management of incoming goods to ensure lead times are met and production lines are consistently supplied with just-in-time and just-in-sequence services.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor, JOC.com,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Joachim Wuest
Head of Automotive Sales, Germany,
DHL Global Forwarding

 


 
3:30 — 4:00 PM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Saal 1 - 2 Foyer

 
 

 
4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

SESSION V: FOREST PRODUCTS

Location: Saal 7 - 10

Forest products are often high volume, relatively low value commodities that face their own unique challenges in the ocean container environment. Key challenges for forest products shippers include container availability, capacity out of key ports, and keeping damage in transit to a minimum. Other challenges include shifting priorities of ocean carriers. Forest products shippers also focus heavily on process innovation to reduce costs, including freight-related expenses but just as importantly through achieving efficiencies to reduce documentation and other shipment processing. This requires access to the full range of ocean carriers to maximise available capacity, state-of-the art order management systems, and cargo visibility.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director,
Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELIST —
Nils Kahn
Chief Commercial Officer and
Deputy Director, MSC Germany
MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company

 
4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

SESSION VI: APPAREL AND FASHION

Location: Saal 1

The fast-moving pace of apparel/fashion logistics through the ocean supply chain requires the highest standards of reliability, speed, and visibility. When moving by ocean, fashion goods are least tolerant of delays, because rapidly evolving consumer preferences mean the value of the industry’s products erodes rapidly when they arrive late to market. Services required include vendor management and origin consolidation; garments on hanger; cross-docking; deconsolidation; direct to store and DC bypass; and customs and duty management.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor, JOC.com,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Fabio Nocentini
Executive Vice President,
Savino Del Bene SpA

 

Jane Singer
Director and Head of Market Intelligence,
Inside Fashion

 
5:00 — 6:00 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: Saal 1 - 2 Foyer

   

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.