September 18 - 20, 2017
Hamburg, Germany

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

DAY 2 — THE MAIN EVENT:
If Monday afternoon was the hors d'oeuvre, Tuesday is the main course. Starting with an informative and forward-looking keynote address, Day 2 of the JOC Container Trade Europe Conference will get to the heart of the issues confronting shippers and their transportation service providers through a mix of single speakers, roundtable-type discussions and formal presentations. See Statement of JOC Conference Editorial Policy below.

 

 
7:30 AM — 5:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 

 


 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: TBD

 
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 


 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: TBD

 
 

 
9:45 — 11:00 AM
 

TAKING STOCK:
ANALYSING THE ECONOMIC AND CONTAINERIZED TRADE OUTLOOK

Location: TBD

 
— PANELISTS —
Philip Damas
Director,
Drewry Supply Chain Advisors

 

 


 
11:00 — 11:30 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: TBD

 
 

 
11:30 AM — 12:30 PM
 

ASIA-EUROPE:
THE CHANGING DYNAMICS OF THE WORLD'S LARGEST CONTAINER TRADE

Location: TBD

Whereas the westbound Asia-to-Europe lane was the headhaul for the past 20 years or more, growth is now faster on the eastbound Europe-to-Asia route and the question of which trade is the headhaul and which is the backhaul is has become murky. With capacity impacted in the wake of the reshuffling of global alliances earlier this year, 2017 has been a challenging year for companies exporting out of Europe while for carriers higher rates are pointing to a recovery that carrier executives say is already under way and will become even more visible as the year goes on. This session will examine the rapidly changing nature of the world's largest containerized trade lane.

 
— PANELISTS —
Rod Riseborough
CEO,
Container Trades Statistics

 

Johan Sigsgaard
Head of Europe Services,
Maersk Line

 


 
12:30 — 1:30 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: TBD

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

ASIA-EUROPE RAIL:
WHY THE INTERCONTINENTAL LANDBRIDGE IS HEATING UP

Location: TBD

From a standing start in 2013, Europe-Asia rail is at a full gallop. Rail freight volumes between Germany and Asia increased tenfold in just one year, according to forwarders. As of May, there were 53 trains running into Europe each week and 23 trains headed back to Asia, with eastbound volumes growing steadily. Westbound transit times are 12 to 18 days, while eastbound transits are 11 to17 days. Origin cities in China are Changsha, Chengdu, Chongqing, Hefei, Shenyang, Suzhou, Wuhan, Yiwu, and Zhengzhou. Destination cities are Duisburg, Hamburg, Lodz, Lyon, Nurnberg, Tilburg, and Warsaw, with a further service into London. It is a showcase project of the Chinese One Belt, One Road initiative that is beginning to build significant volumes in the Asia-Europe trade. As an example of how rail is expanding its reach, less-than-containerload shipments are expanding rapidly in both directions on the China-Europe rail trades, opening the routes to a much wider customer base. Last year, 40,000 containers moved by train between Asia and Europe, according to DB Schenker, which expects volume to increase to more than 100,000 containers by 2020. Other estimates put potential 2020 volumes at 500,000 FEUs. Growth is so robust, in fact, that concern is growing that congestion at key points, such as rail gauge change stops, soon could become an issue. This session will explore the current state of play in Asia-Europe rail with leading figures involved in all aspects of the services.

 
— PANELISTS —
Ken Asztalos
Vice President,
Rail and Intermodal,
AFMS Logistics Management Group

 

Igor Tambaca
President and Founder,
RBC

 


 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

THE TRANS-ATLANTIC:
ANALYZING A CHANGING TRADE

Location: TBD

Although freight rates remain very low, growth is picking up significantly this year on the trans-Atlantic while the market adjusts to new realities such as the EU crackdown on public GRI announcements. IHS Markit is forecasting head-haul Europe-to-US volumes will rise 9.6 percent in 2017 versus just 1.4 percent growth in 2016, while the backhaul US-to-Europe leg is expected to increase 3.2 percent, triple the pace of 0.9 percent a year earlier. Slightly faster European growth this year helps explain the eastbound jump while the US is still in its lengthy expansion. Other positive developments could be a possible revival of the Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, which the US hasn’t officially withdrawn from. The strength of the dollar is hurting US exports and driving eastbound trans-Atlantic spot rates to well less than $100 per container, according to NVOCCs. At the same time, the trans-Atlantic from a logistics flow perspective is adjusting to the implementation of new alliances in April and mega-ships transiting the expanded Panama Canal calling at US East Coast ports and creating larger cargo surges. This session will dive into the major moving parts of this important market. Under new EU antitrust guidelines, carriers can no longer publicly announce GRIs but rather communicate rate increases individually to shippers and NVOCCs, which has changed how pricing develops in this market.

 
 

 

 

 
3:30 — 4:00 PM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: TBD

   

 
4:00 — 4:30 PM
 

EUROPEAN LONGSHORE LABOUR:
A GROWING ISSUE FOR SHIPPERS

Location: TBD

The 18-month longshore labour standoff at the Port of Gothenburg led Atlantic Container Line to threaten to leave the port after 50 years of continuous service, prompted APM Terminals to impose a partial lockout, and spurred Maersk Line and Safmarine to stop accepting bookings. But the situation in Sweden is just one of many disruptive longshore labour scenarios playing out across Europe that could have a big impact on shippers' ocean container supply chains. Among the issues affecting European longshore labour relations are safety at ports, the breakdown of existing labour pool monopolies, the effects of automation/digitalisation/robotisation on ports and employment, and the EU social agenda. This session will offer a forward-looking analysis of where longshore labour relations are headed in Europe and how shippers need to prepare.

 
— PANELIST —
Ruud van der Wel
Head of Global Labour Relations,
APM Terminals

 


 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 

THE DIGITAL FUTURE:
HOW REAL IS IT AND HOW WILL IT UNFOLD? THE DIGITAL FUTURE: HOW REAL IS IT AND HOW WILL IT UNFOLD?

Location: TBD

Shipping is but one of many industries that has come under the spell of digitisation, with little apparent impact so far. We know that multiple startups in the form of "digital forwarders" or "online marketplaces" have sprang into existence over the past few years, backed by hundreds of millions in venture financing and attracting talented technologists into the industry. We know that carriers such as Maersk Line and CMA CGM are seeking to transform themselves from legacy shipping companies into some form of digital enterprise following the GE model. We know that legacy middlemen that add little value feeling increasingly nervous while full service forwarders dismiss the upstarts. But these are still early days. Maersk CEO Soren Skou told investors in May that its digital initiatives "are not doing anything other than adding expenses" but the intent is to improve the customer experience and lower cost. Where is all this headed? This panel discussion will go into great depth on this and other questions.

 
— PANELIST —
Michael Wax
Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer,
FreightHub GmbHl

 


 
5:30 — 7:00 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: TBD

   

 

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.