September 19 - 20, 2017
Hamburg, Germany

AGENDA

CONFERENCE OBJECTIVE:

To provide major users of container shipping services, including retailers, manufacturers, consumer product companies, agribusiness and energy companies with an overall understanding of the major challenges and global environment they and their logistics vendors face when moving containerized cargo into and out of Europe and around the world.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13TH, 2016

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH, 2016

PRINTABLE AGENDA


THEME: UNCOVERING NEW ROUTES TO SUPPLY CHAIN EFFICIENCY

In his keynote address to the 2015 Container Trade Europe Intelligence Conference, Hapag-Lloyd CEO Rolf Habben Jansen outlined why the container shipping industry has a bright future. The industry, he said, already was 20 percent bigger in 2014 than it was in 2008, a year before the 2009 financial crisis led to the biggest recession in decades and a related crash in cargo volumes. “Not many economies are bigger now than in 2008,” he said in urging carriers to take a long-term view of their prospects.

The short term, after all, looks anything but promising, and 2016 will only see a new round of challenges, starting with ho-hum forecasts for growth in global trade volumes amid new deployments of ultra-large container ships that strain landside infrastructure and produce delays in cargo delivery to destination. Trade is coming under increasing pressure as China, one of the largest manufacturers of the past 20 years, grapples with a dramatic economic slowdown that is hitting the major east-west container trades.

The system will undergo further dramatic changes as consolidation among major container lines — CMA CGM acquiring NOL/APL and the merger of China’s two dominant carriers — shake up a system of carrier alliances that already has proved disruptive to supply chains, both at sea in on-time arrivals and at port.

Perhaps the biggest challenge will be the fallout from the largest regulatory initiative since the 24-hour rule and Container Security Initiative of the post-September 11 terrorist attacks: an International Maritime Organization mandate that all containers must have a verified gross mass in order to be loaded aboard a ship. Five months from the July 1 implementation, far more questions about the mandate exist than answers. Only one thing is sure: Shippers should prepare for what could be significant supply chain disruption.

For any company that depends on container shipping as a core element in its international supply chain, the next several years will pose a new and unpredictable set of challenges as these pressures on the system build. Crucial in this dialogue are the shippers themselves, who will describe their challenges, their pain points, avoidable costs, risk mitigation, sourcing strategies and, perhaps most importantly, new ideas and solutions.
 


TOPICS/SESSIONS:

MARKET ANALYSIS

• What does the landscape look like in terms of supply-demand, carrier financials and freight rates?
 

SOLAS WEIGHT VERIFICATION REGULATION

• Two months after the IMO rule took effect, how are BCOs, carriers and terminal operators dealing with the impact?

RISK MANAGEMENT

• How do European BCOs manage supply chain risks related to port congestion, labor uprisings, weather-related disruption, sudden market downturns?

TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION

• What opportunities do BCOs have to reduce costs through advances in technology related to booking and documentation?

CARRIER ALLIANCES AND CONSOLIDATION

• How should BCOs manage a dwindling number of carriers and increasing number of alliances?

CUSTOMER SERVICE

• With rates likely to stay low for the foreseeable future, how are carriers differentiating themselves in the eyes of BCOs? How can BCOs differentiate themselves with carriers?