September 19 - 20, 2017
Hamburg, Germany

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

 

 

 

7:30 AM — 5:00 PM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

8:30 — 9:30 AM

 

WELCOME COFFEE

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

9:30 — 10:00 AM

 

 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

 

 

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce
and JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

10:00 — 10:45AM

 

 

 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

 

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER—

Rolf Habben Jansen
CEO,
Hapag-Lloyd AG

 

 

10:45 — 11:45AM

 

 

 

THE PATH AHEAD:
AN ECONOMIC OVERVIEW

Location: Saal 1 — 2

The global economy headed into the fall was looking somewhat brighter, with global GDP forecast to accelerate slightly in the final months of the 2016 versus earlier in the year. But there will be headwinds. The U.K.'s June 23 vote to leave the European Union, for example, is expected to reduce global growth from 2.5 percent to 2.4 percent in 2016, and from 3.1 percent to 2.7 percent in 2017, according IHS Markit. The eurozone's growth outlook has "weakened appreciably" following the vote, IHS Markit said, with real GDP now projected to be 1.5 percent in 2016, down from the company's previous forecast of 1.7 percent and 1.1 percent in 2017, compared to 1.8 percent. What is the global economic picture for 2017? What will demand growth look like in 2017, and where will oil prices go? Two economists, from HSH Nordbank and IHS Markit, will offer their assessments at the beginning of the conference to help set the tone for the two days of discussion to follow.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Nicola Good
Executive Editor,
IHS Fairplay

 

— PANELISTS —

Elisabeth Waelbroeck Rocha
Chief International Economist,
IHS Markit Economics

 

Cyrus De La Rubia
Chief Economist,
HSH Nordbank

 

 

11:45 AM — 12:45 PM

 

 

 

THE WILD CONTAINER MARKET —
THE STATE OF PLAY AS 2016 LIMPS TO THE FINISH LINE

Location: Saal 1 — 2

By the end of the second quarter of 2016, the industry was immersed in a historic year of consolidation, with several mega-deals announced or in the process of being finalized, including CMA CGM-APL, Cosco-China Shipping and Hapag-Lloyd/UASC. The consolidation had reordered the east-west alliance structure with carriers deeply immersed during the summer of 2016 in re-mapping the new alliance services that will be announced in the fall and take effect in early 2017.

For shippers, this will represent perhaps the single biggest change in east-west services at one time in history. In the second quarter of 2016, some evidence pointed to a rate recover, with some believing pricing had hit bottom and would begin to rise. As of July 8, Asia-Europe spot rates had more than quadrupled in the past four months, to more than $900 per TEU from just over $200 on March 18. “The tide starts turning from now on,” Bjorn Klippel, CEO of Mannheim, Germany-based TIM Consult, told JOC.com in July. “When we look back to the market development a number of years from now, we will say it was the time when the (rate ebb) tide turned.”

With the EU dropping their antitrust investigation but carriers changing how they announce rate increases, the Asia-Europe market will undergo further change. This session will present an overview of the state of play in the container industry and major trade lanes such as Asia-Europe and offer thoughts and analysis on its development into 2017.

 
— SESSION CHAIR
& PRESENTER —

Jesper Praestensgaard
Senior Advisor,
Boston Consulting Group
and Chairman,
Unifeeder

 

— PANELISTS —

Jan Tiedemann
Senior Analyst of Liner Shipping and Ports,
Alphaliner

 

Jens Rohweder
Managing Partner,
Notos Group


 

12:45 — 1:45 PM

 

 

 

LUNCH

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 

1:45 — 2:45 PM

 

 

 

RATE AGREEMENT STRATEGIES — BEST PRACTICES FOR BCOS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

Rate agreements pertaining to European trades not connected to the U.S. are fluid, short term, and responsive to rapidly changing market conditions. The absence of a Federal Maritime Commission-like regulatory system requiring the filing of service contract amendments has created a fluid market for ocean freight reflecting the significant and growing volatility in Asia-Europe and other markets.

With the EU’s trial requirement on carriers to announce GRIs 31 days in advance, how will the market be affected? Does market fluidity lead to questions about annual global tenders? How should BCOs approach direct carrier negotiations in this dynamic environment? What are the advantages of negotiating directly with carriers versus signing onto a forwarder contract? What is the optimal duration of rate agreements? Should they be tied to an independent index? How can working relationships with carriers be maintained during periods of intense rate volatility, which seems to be the status quo?

 
— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —

Chas Deller
Chairman and CEO,
10xoceansolutions.com

 

— PANELISTS —

Hans Bergwerff
Managing Director,
Logfret

 

Andrew Gillespie
Director of Global Logistics,
Ansell Ltd.

 

 

2:45 — 3:30 PM

 

 

 

SCHEDULE RELIABILITY — MANAGING YOUR SUPPLY CHAIN IN AN IMPERFECT DELIVERY CYCLE

Location: Saal 1 — 2

Schedule reliability continues to be a main concern of shippers despite indications that it’s improving. According to Copenhagen-based liner shipping consultant SeaIntel, the 34 lanes it tracks in its Global Liner Performance report showed that reliability improved on a global basis through 2015, “from the abysmal levels in the beginning of the year,” driven primarily by the U.S. West Coast congestion. By the fourth quarter of 2015, the industry was setting record levels of reliability, likely driven by lower bunker costs that allowed carriers to speed up vessels to match schedules. On the other hand, the first quarter of 2016 started off weaker, down 5 to 7 percentage points from the previous quarter.

For shippers, poor reliability — or the mere perception of it — is a daily challenge when managing supply chains ranging from retail to manufacturing. Poor reliability forces shippers to lengthen product lead times, with downstream impacts affecting not only transportation but also far-flung activities ranging from product design and raw materials procurement to scheduling of manufacturing and assembly operations. It also can impact cash flow, working capital as well as revenue and profits in the event of prolonged port disruption. What can carriers do to improve schedule reliability? How can improvements in cargo visibility be delivered so that shortcomings in schedule reliability can be managed effectively? This session will discuss these critical effects of carrier services and more.

 

 
— INTRODUCED BY—

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce
and JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER—

Alan Murphy
CEO and Partner,
SeaIntel Maritime Intelligence

 

 

3:30 — 3:45 PM

 

 

 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
SPONSORED BY

sponsor


 

3:45 — 4:45 PM

 

 

 

CONTAINER SHIPPING DYNAMICS — THE SHIPOWNERS’ VIEW

Location: Saal 1 — 2

A highly relevant view of the container market comes from non-operating shipowners, those who charter container ships to container lines, many of which are based in Hamburg. Germans own 29 percent of the global container ship fleet, according to the Hamburg Shipbrokers Association. Although their source of revenue is charter rates paid by carriers, they have a long-term and all-encompassing perspective on the market that is relevant for all stakeholders, including beneficial cargo owners, carriers and forwarders. This session will present the perspectives on the current environment by this key market player.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Jan Willem Krutemeier
General Manager
Hammonia Reederei GmbH & Co.

 

Peter Eckhardt
Managing Partner,
Martini Chartering & Co.


 

4:45 — 5:45 PM

 

 

 

LONGSHORE LABOR:
WHAT’S HAPPENING AT THE PORTS?

Location: Saal 1 — 2

Dockworker strikes have hit ports in France and Portugal recently. The Swedish Dockworkers’ Union launched a 24-hour strike at APM Terminals in Gothenburg on April 26. Dockworkers in Rotterdam, Europe’s largest port, staged a 24-hour walkout on Jan. 7-8, the port’s first strike in 13 years. They were protesting job losses at the port’s new highly automated terminals, with overcapacity at the port and a slowdown in trade from Asia being contributing factors that the Dutch longshore union FNV Havens reacted to. The European Transport Workers Federation (ETF), the BTB of Belgium, Ver.di of Germany and the CGT of France, as well as the International Transport Workers Federation supported the actions.

Marseilles-Fos says one reason it’s growing faster than the average rate of growth at all European ports is because its labor disruption is a thing of the past. What’s causing these issues? What’s agitating the dockworkers, and where will this lead in the coming months and years? As shippers learned during the U.S. West Coast port labor disruption in late 2014 and early 2015, port disruption can have a significant impact on container supply chains. This panel will discuss these issues in depth.

 

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Niek Stam
National Secretary,
Dockers Section,
FNV

 

Thomas Mendrzik
Chair of the Works Council,
HHLA Container Terminal Altenwerder,
and Chair of the Verdi Dockers Council,
International Transport Workers Federation

 

 


 

6:00 — 8:00 PM

 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location:  Ballin House, Hapag-Lloyd Headquarters

 

 
SPONSORED BY

sponsor

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors’ own industry knowledge. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.