September 19 - 20, 2017
Hamburg, Germany

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

 

 

 

8:00 AM — 2:30 PM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

8:15 — 9:00 AM

 

NETWORKING COFFEE

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

9:00 — 9:15 AM

 

 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

 

 

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

9:15 — 9:45 AM

 

 

THE VIEW FROM GENEVA:
A Q&A WITH MSC'S CAROLINE BECQUART

Location: Saal 1 — 2

As senior vice president for Asia and head of vessel-sharing agreements for Mediterranean Shipping Co., Caroline is a successful and respected member of the MSC senior management team at the company's Geneva headquarters and a global leader in the container shipping industry. Having started her career as a trainee with the business in 1984, she now takes the lead on company strategy in the Asia-Pacific region, including all commercial operations and logistics activities, and has been the driving force behind a number of large-scale commercial transactions. It was under her vision and leadership that MSC achieved exceptional growth when it first entered the Far East trades in 1996, resulting in the business taking its position as one of the world’s leading shipping lines.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —

Caroline Becquart
Senior Vice President of Asia Network
and Vessel-Sharing Alliances,
Mediterranean Shipping Co.

 


 

9:45 — 10:30 AM

 

 

 

INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS FOR FUTURE GROWTH

Location: Saal 1 — 2

The character of trade has changed dramatically. One percentage point of GDP growth no longer results in in multiple percentage points of trade growth, as was the case in the past. What does this mean for container port capacity? What are future port infrastructure needs and how should the industry achieve it? This presentation from Olaf Merk of the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development's International Transport Forum will analyze ITF-OECD research on container port capacity needs in 2030 and discuss ways in which container terminal supply and demand could be better balanced. 

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor for Global Ports,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —

Olaf Merk
Administrator of Ports and Shipping,
International Transport Forum at
the Organisation of Economic Cooperation
and Development


 

10:30 — 11:30 AM

 

 

 

OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE —
WHAT CAN BCOS DO TO DRIVE DOWN COSTS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

Shippers increasingly see opportunities through operational excellence to lower the cost of their day-to-day interactions with container carriers. But some carriers are well ahead in systems integration, offering quality integration that achieves shippers’ sought-after efficiencies and cost reductions. Although shippers have experienced substantial cost savings over the past year as ocean container rates have significantly weakened due to overcapacity, there remain incremental – and more durable – cost saving opportunities achieved through operational excellence. One possible solution is better efficiency around equipment planning and positioning, while other opportunities can be found in IT innovation. This session will explore.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Bjorn Klippel
CEO,
Tim Consult

 

— PANELISTS —

Berit Hagerstrand-Avall
Vice President,
Sea Services,
Stora Enso AB

 

Alexander Naumann
Senior Vice President and
Head of Ocean Freight Germany,
DHL

 

 

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

 

 

 

A MEDITERRANEAN GATEWAY
INTO EUROPE —
FINALLY BECOMING A REALITY?

Location: Saal 1 — 2

For decades, Mediterranean ports had virtually no ability to serve as gateways for cargo headed into southern Germany or other regions in the European interior. Adequate port infrastructure and efficient access to the hinterland were lacking. That’s finally changing, with shippers beginning to achieve a seven- to 10-day reduction in ocean transit times to and from Asia, supported by modern port facilities with deep water and upgraded road and rail facilities. In early May, Bavaria Prime Minister Horst Seehofer visited the North Adriatic region and declared that its ports, including Trieste, should be considered much more for Bavarian trade. As one headline said, “Bavaria Prefers Trieste to Hamburg.”

With bigger vessels causing more congestion in North Europe, and ports and hinterland facilities more than competitive, a dinosaur is stirring and soon may be awakened. Analysts, for example, see Trieste and Koper as having viable hinterland access via road and rail with minimal impact from the Alps. But other ports, including Genoa, La Spezia and Venice, are making a case as gateways accessing the interior, challenging the dominance of the much larger and more established Northern European port range. Under its One Belt, One Road initiative, China is increasingly focusing on Mediterranean and Adriatic ports, including Venice.

Separately, huge infrastructure projects such as the new 57-kilometer-long Gotthard rail tunnel in Switzerland, opening in June, will push this trend toward more southbound traffic. This session will take a close look at how the Mediterranean is developing as an emerging container cargo gateway into and out of Europe.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Daniele Testi
Group Marketing Director,
Contship Italia

 

Jolke A. Helbing
Director,
Royal HaskoningDHV

 

Santiago G. Mila
Deputy Executive Director,
Port of Barcelona


 

12:30 — 1:30 PM

 

 

 

LUNCH

Location: Saal 1 — 2 Foyer

 

 
 

 

1:30 — 2:30 PM

 

 

 

ASIA-EUROPE CONTAINER RAIL:
FINDING ADVANTAGES FOR SHIPPERS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

As shippers shifted cargo from air to ocean and as slow-steaming by container lines became the new normal, a rail market opened up to move cargo between Asia and Europe. It’s still tiny, representing 1 percent of the Asia-Europe market, but volumes are growing. Container volume through Kazakhstan, for example, soared 34 percent year-over-year to 47,000 TEUs in 2014. As service reliability across central Asia and Russia improves, several forwarders, including Geodis Wilson, DB Schenker, UPS and DHL are jumping in, and services are now offered for full and partial container loads.

DHL Global Forwarding runs a daily service from Shanghai, Tianjin or Qingdao that runs along the trans-Siberian Railroad’s northern corridor to Europe. Transit times have dropped dramatically, with goods moving from eastern China to Europe’s borders in just 12 days, compared to 30 to 40 days on the water. If the chargeable weight in a 40-foot container is about 9,600 kilograms, one estimate is the price charged to customers for rail was $8,000 per FEU, $3,000 via ocean freight, and approximately $37,000 by air, (at $3.85 per kilogram). Rates have since declined since that estimate was made, but it shows how rail may be a viable option for certain shippers moving goods in either direction between Asia and Europe. Experts will discuss this trend and the opportunities that may exist for certain shippers.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor for Global Ports,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Christian Drake
Managing Director,
Paribus Capital GmbH

 

Felix Heger
Vice President and Head of
Ocean Freight Europe,
DHL Global Forwarding


 

2:30 — 3:30 PM

 

 

 

DIGITAL INNOVATION —
WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR SHIPPING?

Location: Saal 1 — 2

Digital innovation is coming to the container shipping world and it has the potential to significantly change how business is done. There already are multiple examples of how the Internet is altering business practices but arguably what we’re seeing today is just the beginning of what could be a massive transformation. Internet-based forwarders are creating Expedia-like platforms for booking ocean freight; tracking devices to monitor containers are coming down in price, allowing for startups such as the CMA CGM and MSC-funded TRAXENS to potentially revolutionize real time, at-sea track and trace. Data on container shipments increasingly exists in the cloud, enabling it to be sliced and diced to unlock incremental, unprecedented levels of value. Given the rampant inefficiency that exists throughout the international container supply chain — whether in the form of ship or cargo delays, under-utilization of terminals and other assets, and excessive inventory levels due to mandatory buffer stocks — the opportunities for shippers, carriers, forwarders and others is extraordinary. This panel will present cutting-edge thinking on how digitization has begun transforming the container supply chain.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Kai Miller
Consultant,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Gion-Otto Presser-Velder
Chief Logistics Officer,
Rocket Internet SE

 

Zvi Schreiber
CEO,
Freightos

 

Michel Fallah
CEO,
Traxens

 

Johannes Schlingmeier
Head of BCG xChange,
Boston Consulting Group


 

3:30 PM

 

 

 

CLOSING REMARKS

Location: Saal 1 — 2

 

 
 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors’ own industry knowledge. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.