November 06 - 08, 2017
Atlanta, Georgia

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2016

DAY 1 — SETTING THE SCENE

The initial afternoon of the 2016 Inland Distribution Conference will offer an overview of the key issues impacting shippers utilizing trucking companies, intermodal railroads and third-party logistics providers to move their goods to and from the North American heartland. A combination of macroeconomic analysis, exclusive workshops and real-life case studies will offer attendees a variety of formats to enhance their experience while learning from the industry’s most authoritative experts.

 

 

10:00 AM — 5:30PM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

 

 
— SPONSORED BY

sponsor

 


 

12:00 — 1:00 PM

 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Networking area  

Join your colleagues in this hourlong welcome to Memphis, featuring a mix of seating options allowing you to stand, sit or walk the floor. Visit with your customers at surrounding sponsored tabletops and reconnect with friends and business partners ahead of an afternoon of in-depth conference programs.

 
 

 


 

1:00 — 1:15 PM

 

 

WELCOMING REMARKS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

 

 

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

1:15 — 2:00 PM

 

 

 

THE ROAD AHEAD: MAPPING A BUMPY ROUTE

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

The economic slowdown in 2015 and 2016 offered shippers a breather this year after they experienced a sharp rise in trucking and intermodal rates in 2014. Even a moderate uptick in economic growth could change the transportation landscape in 2017, however. Constraints on highway capacity are likely to tighten as time keeps slipping away from truck drivers. E-commerce demands, the influx of larger container ships, and tight warehouse capacity are complicating inland supply chains, and all will increase cost pressures in the coming years. And, although the slowdown may have alleviated the driver problem, it hasn’t gone away. Regardless of who wins the White House, the push to make highways safer, often by regulating trucking, isn’t going away. Shippers and carriers already are anticipating the impact of the electronic logging mandate slated to kick in next December, and other rules are in the works that could affect capacity. The stakes are high for shippers and carriers. Chuck Clowdis, who leads IHS consulting projects for clients including federal and state agencies, municipal planning organizations and freight transportation service providers and shippers, assisting Fortune 500 and smaller companies, will steer us through IHS Markit’s transportation outlook for 2017 and beyond. Fasten your safety belts.

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

— FEATURED SPEAKER —

Charles W. “Chuck” Clowdis
Managing Director For Transportation,
IHS Economics & Country Risk

 


 

2:00 — 3:00 PM

 

 

CASE STUDY 
INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO INLAND CHALLENGES THROUGH BIG DATA

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

The challenging and consistent problem of adequate container supply at inland locations to support exports has been with the industry for years. Ocean carriers are reluctant to position containers to inland locations in the best of times, and are extremely reluctant to do so today in a market where freight rates often fail to cover variable costs. Without a consistent and adequate supply of containers at the right time and at the right place, exporters can't support existing markets and develop new ones. Exporters correctly point out that the U.S. usually has a large supply of surplus containers. Why can’t the container be made available in the needed inland locations? Is there any credible solution to this challenge? This case study will examine the issue using metrics and data analysis that can help determine where available containers will be and when.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Dean Tracy
Managing Director,
Global Integrated Solutions

 

— PANELISTS —

Dale Butterfield
Manager of Import Logistics,
American Tire Distributors

 

Tammy Leurquin
SVP of IT and Operations,
MatchBack Systems

 

Christopher Mazza
Sales,
ClearMetal

 

Marco Huijsman
Managing Director,
Cofano

 

THINK TANK ROUND TABLES: TRACK I

 

2:00 — 3:00 PM

 

 

 

LOCATION: Networking Area (Ballroom C,D,E,F)

LIMITED SPACE IS AVAILABLE FOR THESE SESSIONS AND YOU MUST BE PRE-REGISTERED TO ATTEND

In these exclusive, reservation-only round tables, experts on four subjects critical to shippers’ strategic planning in the coming months will lead interactive discussion in an informal environment. Space is limited and will be reserved during registration.

 
 

  


 

I

 

 

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICES — PREPARING FOR TRUCKING’S NEXT BIG DISRUPTIVE FORCE

Trucking’s electronic logging mandate is a year away, but shippers aren’t waiting until then to ensure their carriers comply with the federal rule. They’re effectively advancing the deadline by requiring carriers to spell out how and when they’ll be ready to transition to e-logs.

Many questions remain: How will shippers and brokers ensure their carriers are complying with the law, and what liabilities could they face if they contract or hire a trucker that isn’t? How difficult will it be for carriers without ELDs to comply on deadline? What if the mandate cuts into truck capacity? We’ll discuss these issues and more to help you prepare for the electronic logging mandate.

 
— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Brian Fielkow
President, Jetco Delivery

 


 

II

 

 

NEW FDA RULES — HOW WILL THEY AFFECT FREIGHT SHIPPING?

U.S. shippers, logistics operators and carriers involved in the transportation of food are bracing for sweeping new food safety rules that could transform the food supply chain at home and abroad. The final rule on sanitary transportation of human and animal food — the sixth of seven Food and Drug Administration rulemakings required by the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act — took effect in June.

Although large companies will have a year to comply and smaller companies two years, the time for trucking companies and railroads to develop best practices in such areas as properly refrigerating food, adequately cleaning vehicles between loads and properly protecting food during transportation is now. Implementing the rule, inspired by several outbreaks of foodborne disease over the past decade, will cost an estimated $115 million a year to implement, according to the FDA.

With shippers, loaders, receivers and carriers all subject to the rule, an integrated approach to solutions is in everyone’s best interest. This discussion will get to the heart of the rule, while raising best practices and potential solutions to what is shaping up to be one of the industry’s biggest disruptors of the next two years.

 
— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Matt Williams
President & Co-Founder,
Pro Star Logistics

 


 

III

 

 

DRIVER COERCION: HOW SHOULD SHIPPERS PREPARE?

Shippers could be exposed to serious penalties and liabilities under a truck driver coercion rule that took effect this year, but many shippers still have no plan in place to deal with this rule. What actually constitutes coercion and what doesn’t?

What type of guidelines should shippers have for managers and employees who deal with truck drivers, either occasionally or on a regular basis? What should you do if your company is hit with a coercion complaint? How can a shipper prepare a program to prevent driver coercion? These are all questions we’ll discuss as we deliver actionable advice shippers can use to protect their business.

 
— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Meg Schmidt-Duncan
Director of Operations,
Koch Logistics

 


 

IV

 

 

FINDING CRITICAL TALENT

It’s a common problem with no easy solution: You’re the department head of a major transportation company with a talented, but aging Baby Boomer staff. Where do you turn to ensure a smooth transition as, one by one, your staff — and decades of experience and talent — prepares to call it a career? But that’s just one aspect of an increasingly complicated dilemma for companies up and down the supply chain.

Already facing a potentially critical driver shortage when demand picks up, motor carriers are asking more of their truckers than ever before as the job takes on increasing responsibility as new regulations require technology-based solutions. In an increasingly digital age, logistics providers must be more flexible and creative than ever.

So where do you turn to find the brightest minds to fill these critical roles? For some, a youth movement may be in order. For others, educating from within may be a better option. With no universal solution, this workshop will look at specific needs of specific companies in an exclusive, intimate discussion led by Dr. Stephanie Ivey, director of the Intermodal Freight Transport Institute at the University of Memphis.

 
— SPONSORED BY

sponsor
 

— INTRODUCED BY —

Daniel Pastore
Manager, Functional Support, Port Department,
The Port Authority of NY & NJ

 

— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Dr. Stephanie Ivey
Associate Professor & Director of
the Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute,
University Of Memphis

 


 

3:00 — 3:30

 

 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Networking Area

 

 
 

 


 

3:30 — 4:30 PM

 

 

CASE STUDY
MATCHING IMPORTERS WITH EXPORTERS TO FILL THE BACKHAUL

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

With railroads hurting from the carload volume slump and hungry for intermodal loads, ailing container lines looking for savings, and shippers under constant pressure to reduce costs, match-backing, or sending back-haul loads, is more appealing than ever. Unfortunately, multiple moving parts, players with different goals, and often-high costs to reposition equipment make matching an export rail move to an import rail move tricky. This case-study on match-backing heavy import loads with outbound freight in Memphis, Kansas City, Chicago and other inland distribution centers won't shrink from the challenges. Attendees will come away with a clear-eyed view of the hurdles and potential, and best practices from those who have made match-backing work. 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

 
— PANELISTS —

Bruce Abbe
Executive Director,
Midwest Shippers Association

 

John Beasley
Director of Logistics,
NorthPoint Development

 

Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

 

Paul Tonsager
President,
Director Supply Chain
Development and Optimization,
CN

 

THINK TANK ROUND TABLES: TRACK II

 

3:30 — 4:30 PM

 

 

 

LOCATION: Networking Area (Ballroom C,D,E,F)

LIMITED SPACE IS AVAILABLE FOR THESE SESSIONS AND YOU MUST BE PRE-REGISTERED TO ATTEND

In these exclusive, reservation-only round tables, experts on four subjects critical to shippers’ strategic planning in the coming months will lead interactive discussion in an informal environment. Space is limited and will be reserved during registration.

 
 

  


 

I

 

 

ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICES: PREPARING FOR TRUCKING’S NEXT BIG DISRUPTIVE FORCE

Trucking’s electronic logging mandate is a year away, but shippers aren’t waiting until then to ensure their carriers comply with the federal rule. They’re effectively advancing the deadline by requiring carriers to spell out how and when they’ll be ready to transition to e-logs.

Many questions remain: How will shippers and brokers ensure their carriers are complying with the law, and what liabilities could they face if they contract or hire a trucker that isn’t? How difficult will it be for carriers without ELDs to comply on deadline? What if the mandate cuts into truck capacity? We’ll discuss these issues and more to help you prepare for the electronic logging mandate.

 
— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Brian Fielkow
President, Jetco Delivery

 


 

II

 

 

NEW FDA RULES:
HOW WILL THEY AFFECT FREIGHT SHIPPING?

U.S. shippers, logistics operators and carriers involved in the transportation of food are bracing for sweeping new food safety rules that could transform the food supply chain at home and abroad. The final rule on sanitary transportation of human and animal food — the sixth of seven Food and Drug Administration rulemakings required by the 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act — took effect in June.

Although large companies will have a year to comply and smaller companies two years, the time for trucking companies and railroads to develop best practices in such areas as properly refrigerating food, adequately cleaning vehicles between loads and properly protecting food during transportation is now. Implementing the rule, inspired by several outbreaks of foodborne disease over the past decade, will cost an estimated $115 million a year to implement, according to the FDA.

With shippers, loaders, receivers and carriers all subject to the rule, an integrated approach to solutions is in everyone’s best interest. This discussion will get to the heart of the rule, while raising best practices and potential solutions to what is shaping up to be one of the industry’s biggest disruptors of the next two years.

— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Matt Williams
President,
Pro Star Logistics

 


 

III

 

 

DRIVER COERCION: HOW SHOULD SHIPPERS PREPARE?

Shippers could be exposed to serious penalties and liabilities under a truck driver coercion rule that took effect this year, but many shippers still have no plan in place to deal with this rule. What actually constitutes coercion and what doesn’t?

What type of guidelines should shippers have for managers and employees who deal with truck drivers, either occasionally or on a regular basis? What should you do if your company is hit with a coercion complaint? How can a shipper prepare a program to prevent driver coercion? These are all questions we’ll discuss as we deliver actionable advice shippers can use to protect their business.

 
— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Meg Schmidt-Duncan
Director of Operations,
Koch Logistics

 


 

IV

 

 

FINDING CRITICAL TALENT

It’s a common problem with no easy solution: You’re the department head of a major transportation company with a talented, but aging Baby Boomer staff. Where do you turn to ensure a smooth transition as, one by one, your staff — and decades of experience and talent — prepares to call it a career? But that’s just one aspect of an increasingly complicated dilemma for companies up and down the supply chain.

Already facing a potentially critical driver shortage when demand picks up, motor carriers are asking more of their truckers than ever before as the job takes on increasing responsibility as new regulations require technology-based solutions. In an increasingly digital age, logistics providers must be more flexible and creative than ever.

So where do you turn to find the brightest minds to fill these critical roles? For some, a youth movement may be in order. For others, educating from within may be a better option. With no universal solution, this workshop will look at specific needs of specific companies in an exclusive, intimate discussion led by Dr. Stephanie Ivey, director of the Intermodal Freight Transport Institute at the University of Memphis.

 
— SPONSORED BY

sponsor
 

— INTRODUCED BY —

Daniel Pastore
Manager, Functional Support, Port Department,
The Port Authority of NY & NJ

 

— ROUND TABLE LEADER —

Dr. Stephanie Ivey
Associate Professor & Director of
the Intermodal Freight Transportation Institute,
University Of Memphis

 


 

4:30 — 5:30

 

 

PLANNING FOR 2017:
THE SHIPPER-BROKER PERSPECTIVE

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A&B)

As 2016 began to wind down, the outlook for the domestic US shipping environment opaque. Shipper expectations were measured and tamped down at the lowest point yet in the seven-year US economic recovery from the Great Recession. That was evident in the convergence of unexpectedly low demand and the addition of truck capacity, coupled with a dramatic drop in fuel prices and carrier fuel surcharges, that have resulted in a significant decline in over-the-road truck and intermodal rail pricing and revenue. According to the Cass Truckload Linehaul Index, truckload rates dropped year-over-year for seven consecutive months from March through September, the longest such decline since 2009-10. Cass truckload rates over that period dropped an average of 2 percent year-over-year, though shippers reportedly asked individual carriers for much deeper cuts. Intermodal pricing turned negative on an annualized basis much earlier, starting in January 2015, according to the Cass Intermodal Pricing Index. Over the 21 months between January 2015 and September 2016, intermodal rates dropped on average 2.3 percent per month year-over-year, depressed by lower truckload pricing and falling fuel surcharges. Change is in the air, and on the highways, however, and shippers will be among those to feel the impact most. In late September, the first joint Shipper Survey by The Journal of Commerce, NASSTRAC and Truckstop.com took the pulse of the domestic transportation market, asking shippers and freight brokers about their expectations for the next six months and the year ahead. This panel will reveal and analyze the results, based on the views of those at the nerve center of the North American transportation market.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Gail Rutkowski
Executive Director,
NASSTRAC and President,
Wabash Worldwide Logistics

 

Roxanne Bullard
Director of Research,
Truckstop.com

 

 


 

5:30 — 7:00 PM

 

 

WELCOMING RECEPTION

LOCATION: Networking Area

 

Before heading out for the evening, network with new colleagues and reconnect with others in this 90-minute reception that will feature television network coverage of the presidential and congressional election. Want an idea of how the next four years will look in Washington? Watch and discuss with your industry peers here first.

 
 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors’ own industry knowledge. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.