January 24, 2017
London, UK

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

 
8:00 AM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Whitehall Suite

   

 
8:00 — 9:00 AM
 

BREAKFAST

Location: Whitehall Suite

   

 
9:00 — 9:15 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Richard Clayton
Chief Correspondent,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 
9:15 — 10:00 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Richard Clayton
Chief Correspondent,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
Mark Dickinson
General Secretary,
Nautilus

 
10:00 — 11:00 AM
 

INSURERS:
INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL RISKS

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

Marine and P&I insurers face increasing challenges to deliver profits in an ever more deflated market. With global marine premiums falling by 10.5 percent in 2015, underwriters have to justify their performance at a time when their clients are struggling in a flat maritime market. With increasing competition putting more pressure on pricing, is the marine insurance sector at the breaking point? What are the potential catalysts to change the pricing cycle? Increased talk of mergers and acquisitions, coupled with growing fears over the scale of aggregated exposures, are giving insurers a renewed focus, but what can they control in the current market? Is greater emphasis on risk prevention the answer in an environment where increasing premiums is out of the question?

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Wayne Blumenthal
Commercial and Strategic Manager,
RightShip

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Jon Guy
Insurance Correspondent,
IHS Fairplay,
IHS Maritime & Trade

  

— PANELISTS —
David Mahoney
Director,
Aon Risk Solutions

 

Marcus Baker
Chairman and Managing Director,
Global Marine Practice,
Marsh Ltd.

 

Lars Rhodin
Managing Director,
The Swedish Club

 

Hugo Wynn-Williams
Chairman,
Thomas Miller P&I Ltd.

 

 


 
11:00 — 11:30 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Whitehall Suite

 
 

 
11:30 AM — 12:30 PM
 

CYBER CRIME:
LITTLE UNDERSTOOD BUT A VERY REAL RISK

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

The risk of cyber attacks on shipping is real. According to a recent Fairplay survey, 21 percent of shipping companies acknowledged they had been hacked; 57 percent claimed to know they had not been attacked; 22 percent didn't respond, perhaps because some were unwilling to discuss having been the subject of an attack. Of those acknowledging an attack, 77 percent said it was malware, and 57 percent phishing. The vulnerabilities take different forms. Ships, for example, are increasingly connected via satellite to shore centres. While this presents known risks from hackers, unsecure USB sticks and DVDs can be even more dangerous. It's not an exaggeration to say that cyber crime has the potential to destroy maritime companies. Insurance brokers and underwriters have little idea how to respond, but they are concerned. This session will identify best practices to minimise the risk of cyber attack, and analyse the financial consequences of failing to act.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Nicola Good
Executive Editor, IHS.Fairplay,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —
Philip Tinsley
Maritime Security Manager,
BIMCO

 

Howard Brown
Managing Director,
Templar Global Services

 

Gert-Jan Panken
VP of Maritime Applications,
Inmarsat

 

Melvyn Scott
Programme Manager,
Qinetiq

 
12:30 — 1:30 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Whitehall Suite

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

RISK MITIGATION IN CREWING

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

It's often said that the standard of today's seafarers isn't as high as in previous years. Is this correct? If so, what can be done to raise standards of competency, professionalism and a safety culture, and how will this reduce incidents, minimise risk, and cut unnecessary expense? With vessels becoming ever more complex and shipping companies looking to reduce the number of crewmembers on board, crews are being asked to carry out an ever wider range of tasks. Are shipowners doing enough to train crews in safety and risk management techniques? In an effort to utilise experienced crews, are owners carrying out the necessary medical and fitness tests before crews are allowed on board?

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Stuart Edmonston
Loss Prevention Director,
UK P&I

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Richard Clayton
Chief Correspondent,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —
David Appleton
Professional and Technical Officer,
Nautilus International

 

Colin Gillespie
Deputy Director (Loss Prevention),
The North of England P&I Association

 
2:30 — 3:30 PM
 

REGULATORY RISK: COMPLYING WITH GREATLY EXPANDED DEMANDS

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

Installing a ballast water treatment kit is only the latest regulatory cost for shipowners. Meeting bunker quality, safety appliance, and recycling guidelines are others, and shipowners must be in compliance or risk fines. Shipping is a low-margin activity, so any additional cost imposed by external forces can push companies to the edge. Given the massive regulatory expectation, how can shipping companies fit ballast water treatment facilities, install scrubbers or burn distillate fuel, reduce nitrous oxide, sulfur oxide, carbon dioxide and particulate matter emissions and still make a profit? Regulators are demanding that shipping fits all sorts of emissions-defeating devices. No one is arguing that you should only protect the environment when the money is available, but to take the ballast water regulation as an example, a $1.5 million installation on a ship worth $3 million to $4 million would incentivise owners to scrap their ships.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Richard Clayton
Chief Correspondent,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

 

— PANELISTS —
Frederick Kenney
Director, Legal Affairs and
External relations Division,
International Marine Organisation

 

Debasis Mazumdar
CEO,
St. Kitts & Nevis Flag

 


 
3:30 — 4:00 PM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Whitehall Suite

   

 
4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

LOW-LEVEL CORRUPTION:
A HEIGHTENED RISK FOR SHIPPING COMPANIES

Location: Eaton & Chester Room

Bribes, backhanders and facilitation payments have always been part of the shipping industry, but regulators have now tightened up. In the past, 200 cigarettes and a couple of bottles of whiskey could settle fines, or allow cargo interests to jump a queue, and speed up cargo handling. No longer. It's now a usually a criminal offence to benefit from facilitation payments. Companies that allow facilitation payments open themselves up to unnecessary risk and cost. Is there a legal alternative, or do companies have to suffer financially as unethical competitors win business? What can be done to reduce exposure in this area?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Richard Clayton
Chief Correspondent,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —
Tim Springett
Policy Director,
Employment and Legal,
UK Chamber of Shipping

 

Captain Nicholas Cooper
Master Mariner Consultant,
Cwaves Ltd.

 

Kostas Gkonis
Secretary General,
Intercargo

 
5:00 — 6:00 PM
 

DRINKS RECEPTION

Location: Whitehall Suite

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor