7:30 AM

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8  

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

7:30 AM

BREAKFAST

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

8:30 AM - 8:45 AM

OPENING REMARKS

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom In this opening statement to the JOC Port Performance Conference, Peter Tirschwell, Senior Director for Content, IHS Maritime & Trade, will share the latest trends in North American port productivity, discuss the issues confronting beneficial cargo owners and other supply chain interests and set the stage for the remainder of the conference.

 

Peter Tirschwell Senior Director Content, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

8:45 - 9:30 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom Peter Ford, chief strategy officer for Ports America Group, will discuss productivity at North American container terminals and how it compares to productivity at terminals in Asia and Europe. What are North American terminals doing right, and what can they do to improve their performance alongside the vessel, in the container yard and at the gate? What can ocean carriers do to be a partner in this process? For example, will improved vessel stowage in Asia result in more efficient discharging of containers at North American ports? West Coast ports are predicting that in the next several years vessels with capacities of up to 18,000 TEUs will be calling at their terminals. Will terminal operators be ready to handle these super-post-Panamax ships?

 

Peter Tirschwell Senior Director Content, IHS Maritime & Trade

— Guest Speaker — Peter Ford Chief Strategy Officer, Ports America

 


 

9:30 - 10:30 AM

AUTOMATION — IT'S COMING TO A MARINE TERMINAL IN YOUR PORT

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom Automated marine terminals were once believed to be feasible only for the highest-volume ports in Europe and North America. But there are so many options available today — laser-guided ship-to-shore cranes, automated yard stacking cranes, automated guided vehicles and strads, and automated on-dock rail — that many ports can find automated applications that will help terminals handle greater container volumes more efficiently in land-constrained seaports. With cargo surges from today’s mega-ships overwhelming marine terminals designed to handle much smaller vessels, terminal operators have no choice but to consider some form of automation. This panel will analyze automation options for North American terminal operators.

 

SPONSORED BY:

Navis

— INTRODUCED BY — Chuck Schneider Vice President and General Manager of the Americas, Navis, LLC

— SESSION CHAIR — Bill Mongelluzzo Senior Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — Larry Nye Senior Vice President, Moffatt & Nichol

Shawn Tibbetts Chief Operating Officer, Port of Virginia

 


 

10:30 - 11:00 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

SPONSORED BY:

NWSPA

 


 

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

LABOR SPOTLIGHT — LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom The ILWU contract negotiations of 2002 and 2014, and the ILA negotiations of 2012 were gut-wrenching experiences that resulted in port congestion, cargo diversions and huge costs to cargo interests, in addition to tarnishing the reputations of U.S. ports. Even in those years where waterfront contracts aren’t being negotiated, U.S. port performance, in the words of one shipping expert, amounts to “third-world productivity.” Two bills have been submitted in Congress to prevent future blowouts. In what promises to be a fiery discussion, labor and management officials from both coasts will discuss how work rules and practices can be modernized for this era of big ships, and how future contract negotiations can be conducted in a more civilized manner.

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Bill Mongelluzzo Senior Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — James C. McKenna President, Pacific Maritime Association

Sal Ferrigno Vice President, SSA Marine

Patrick Burgoyne President and CEO, NYK Ports the holding company of Yusen Terminals (YTI) and Ceres Terminals Inc. (CTI)

 


 

12:00 - 1:00 PM

LUNCH

LOCATION: Bascalls & Bogarts

 

 

 


 

1:00 - 2:00PM

THE NEXT GENERATION OF MARINE TERMINALS: WHO WILL PAY?

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom It will take billions of dollars to modernize marine terminals and port-related road, rail and bridge infrastructure in order to make North American ports big-ship ready. Many ports historically have refused to charge compensatory lease rates for fear of losing business to competing ports. Terminal operators likewise are under pressure from shipping lines not to raise their charges or risk losing the lines to competing terminals. Ports, be they operators or landlords, are seeking new financial models such as public-private partnerships, the sale of assets to private sector port operators and collaboration with investment banking firms. This session will examine the benefits and risks inherent in these models.

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Bill Mongelluzzo Senior Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — Gene Seroka Executive Director, Port of Los Angeles

James Newsome III President and CEO, South Carolina Ports Authority

Jeff Holt Managing Director, Public Finance Group, BMO Capital Markets

 


 

2:00 - 3:00 PM

REDUCING DWELL TIME AND INCREASING VELOCITY AT MARINE TERMINALS

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom Excessive container dwell time and cargo-handling practices that date back to the days of breakbulk continue to plague marine terminals, but it doesn’t have to be that way. The Port of Long Beach is implementing promising techniques such as container dray-offs and peel-off technology that are helping to reduce terminal congestion and container dwell times. Shipping lines are working more closely with terminal operators to provide vessel stowage plans in advance of ship arrivals, and carriers are working to discourage excessive free-time for container storage. Intermodal operators are cooperating with terminals to make the hand-off of containers to inland carriers smoother and more transparent. These measures should help to reduce the disturbing and frustrating increase in demurrage charges that have soured relations among shippers, carriers and terminal operators on both coasts. Port of Long Beach Chief Executive Jon Slangerup will lead a discussion on making marine terminals facilitators of supply-chain efficiency.

 

— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER — Jon Slangerup CEO, Port of Long Beach

— PANELISTS — Marc S. Blubaugh Partner, Benesch, Friedlander, Coplan & Aronoff LLP and General Counsel, Intermodal Association of North America

Howard Finkel Executive Vice President, Cosco Americas Inc.

 


 

3:00 - 3:30 PM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

3:30 - 4:30 PM

FIXING HARBOR TRUCKING AND IMPROVING WAREHOUSE CONNECTIVITY

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom Harbor trucking associations on both coasts are clamoring for an end to two- to three-hour wait times at marine terminals, restricted gate hours and mistreatment of drivers by longshore labor. Calls from drayage carriers for reasonable turn times are beginning to resonate with terminal and warehouse operators. Gate productivity is a complex challenge that eventually could involve mandatory trucker appointment systems, fees to support extended gate hours and, with hundreds of motor carriers and thousands of truckers competing for business in the larger gateways, consolidation in harbor trucking. Warehouse operators face similar challenges, including a dwindling supply of workers and a need for more efficient cargo processing. Experts from the drayage and warehouse industries will discuss best practices in this rapidly evolving sector of the international supply chain.

 

SPONSORED BY:

Salson

— INTRODUCED BY — Louis Di Donato Corp. Director of Sales, Salson Logistics

— SESSION CHAIR — William Cassidy Senior Editor, Trucking, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — Victor La Rosa President, CEO and Co-founder, Total Transportation Services Inc.

Ken Kellaway President and CEO, RoadOne IntermodaLogistics

David Widdifield Director of Retail Solutions, Crane Worldwide Logistics

 


 

4:30 - 5:15 PM

A LONGSHOREMAN'S VIEW — HOW TO IMPROVE MARINE TERMINAL PRODUCTIVITY

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom Longshoremen work the docks day in and day out, and they must be an integral part of the discussion groups that ports are forming to improve marine terminal productivity. Dockworkers emphasize that marine terminals no longer can be used as storage facilities in this era of big ships. Containers must be unloaded from vessels and moved as quickly as possible to distribution warehouses or off-dock storage yards. The industry still hasn't adjusted to the equipment shortages that have developed now that carriers no longer provide chassis to their customers. Extended gate hours are becoming a necessity at many ports, and employers must adequately staff extended gates and weekend gates, and keep the terminals open during lunch breaks. This panel will examine the longshore perspective on terminal productivity.

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Bill Mongelluzzo Senior Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELIST — Dean McGrath President, ILWU Local 23 in Tacoma

 


 

5:15 - 7:15 PM

NETWORKING RECEPTION

LOCATION: Metropolitan Ballroom

 

 

 


Statement of JOC Conference Editorial Policy:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors’ own industry knowledge. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.