December 2017, New Jersey

 

8:00 AM

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

8:00 AM

BREAKFAST

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

8:30 - 8:45 AM

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

 

Peter Tirschwell Senior Director Content, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

8:45 – 9:45 AM

YARD EFFICIENCY I: TRUCK APPOINTMENTS AT THE GATE

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom Mandatory trucker appointments can be tantamount to waving a red flag in front of a bull, but appointment systems are in operation at some major ports around the world, and they are achieving a level of success that U.S. ports should admire. What are the pros and cons of trucker appointment systems and what can be done to improve upon those appointment systems that are already in place at some U.S. terminals? Are there certain features, incentives or disincentives that must be included in an appointment system to make it successful? Can port authorities play a role by incentivizing appointments?

 

SPONSORED BY:

Advent Intermodal

— INTRODUCED BY — Jay Kronberg Vice President, Business Development, Advent Intermodal Solutions, Inc.

— SESSION CHAIR — Joseph Bonney Senior Editor, JOC.com, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — Frank Harder Principal, Tioga Group

Bethann Rooney Assistant Director for Port Performance Initiatives, Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

John Cushing President of PierPass Inc.

Jeffrey Bader CEO, Golden Carriers Inc., and President, Association of Bi-State Harbor Truckers

 


 

9:45 - 10:30 AM

REGULATING EFFICIENCY — THE FMC’S ROLE IN PORT PRODUCTIVITY

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom The U.S. Federal Maritime Commission is using its research acumen to analyze how larger vessels and carrier alliances are changing the competitive environment, driving ports and terminal operators to consolidate and generating unprecedented congestion at ports across the country. The commission last year held regional forums on port congestion, and its findings and best practices are documented in the port congestion report released earlier this year. The FMC is aggressively using its regulatory authority to ensure industry participants do not profit from the current environment, such as through unwarranted demurrage and detention charges. FMC Commissioner William P. Doyle will present an update on the commission’s progress, followed by a Q&A session with JOC.com Executive Editor Mark Szakonyi.

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Mark Szakonyi Executive Editor, JOC.com, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELIST — William P. Doyle Commissioner, Federal Maritime Commission

 


 

10:30 - 10:45 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

10:45 – 11:45AM

OCEAN CARRIER ROUNDTABLE — ARE SHIPPING LINES GETTING WHAT THEY PAY FOR?

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom Shipping lines are the direct customers of container terminal operators, but are they receiving the cargo-handling efficiencies and vessel turn-times that they need for their mega-ships? JOC berth productivity numbers for ports around the world indicate that productivity at North American terminals is lagging. A panel of carrier executives will discuss bottlenecks at marine terminals and offer suggestions for improvement. At the same time, carrier executives will tell us what shipping lines can do to be part of the solution, such as improving on-time performance, sharing vessel stowage plans with terminals and addressing the nagging problem of extended free time for container storage at marine terminals.

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Peter Tirschwell Senior Director Content, IHS Maritime & Trade

— Panelists — Allen Clifford Executive Vice President, Mediterranean Shipping Co.

Tim Child Chief Operating Officer, SeaLand

 


 

11:45AM – 12:45PM

SHIPPER PERSPECTIVES — WHAT'S AT STAKE FOR BENEFICIAL CARGO OWNERS?

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom Retailers and other BCOs no longer view marine terminals as a byzantine environment best left to the terminal operators. Logistics directors from a number of retailers are in constant contact with ports and terminal operators, sometimes camping out for days in times of crisis such as during the West Coast labor slowdowns. The BCOs work diligently to free their containers from the terminals, and in the process cooperate with terminal operators to do what they can to improve port productivity. What best practices can these BCOs share with the port communities to raise U.S. ports to world-class productivity?

 

— SESSION CHAIR — Dean Tracy Transportation Consultant, Global Integrated Services, LLC

— PANELISTS — Willis Weirich Senior Group Manager, International Transportation, Target Corporation

Donald A. Pisano President, American Coffee Corp.

Caryn Blanc Managing Partner, The Triangle Group

 


 

12:45 – 1:00 PM

CLOSING REMARKS WITH AWARDS

Based on the JOC Port Productivity data, JOC Events will recognize the top three ports and top three terminals in North America for the first half of 2015.

Top Ports in the United States - First Half 2015

First: Port of Baltimore Second: Port of New York/New Jersey Third (tie):Port of Charleston and Georgia Ports Authority

Top Terminals the United States- First Half 2015

First (tie): Maher Terminals and Seagirt Marine Terminal Second: North Charleston Terminal (NCT) Third: Garden City Terminal

 

 

 


 

1:00 – 2:00 PM

LUNCH

LOCATION: Bacalls and Bogarts

 

 

 


 

2:00PM

CONFERENCE ENDS

LOCATION: Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


Statement of JOC Conference Editorial Policy:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors’ own industry knowledge. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.