December 12 - 13, 2017
Newark, New Jersey

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

 

 

 
7:30 AM — 5:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

WELCOME BREAKFAST

Location: TBD

 

 
 

 

 


 
8:30 — 8:45 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: TBD

 
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor, JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
8:45 — 9:30 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: TBD

Carriers in 2017-18 are scheduled to take delivery of 150 vessels capable of carrying 10,000 to 20,000 TEU, according to Tan Hua Joo, an executive consultant with research firm Alphaliner. In the trans-Pacific, the vessel of choice soon will be in the 13,000-TEU range, said David Arsenault, president of Logistics Transformation Solutions. In addition to adjusting to the steady upsizing of vessels, North American ports must contend with the formation in April of three powerful carrier alliances that will pressure terminal operators to turn the mega-ships more quickly and efficiently, and at a lower cost, or risk losing their business. Keith Svendsen, chief operating officer of APM Terminals, will launch the 2017 JOC Port Performance North America Conference with a detailed analysis of the challenges terminal operators face at the berth, in the container yard, and at the gates. What key performance indicators do shipping lines deploy to measure port performance? What will be expected from North American ports in providing terminal capacity, super-post-Panamax cranes, and road and rail infrastructure to enhance supply-chain velocity? As ports densify their operations to handle the projected increase in container volume, is automation of marine terminals the answer?

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
Keith Svendsen
Chief Operating Officer,
APM Terminals

 


 
9:30 — 10:30 AM
 

NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY:
THE CRUNCH IS ON

Location: TBD

Now that the Panama Canal widening and Bayonne Bridge raising projects have been completed, vessels with capacities of up to 14,000 TEUs are calling at the US East Coast's largest port complex on a weekly basis. How well — or not — are marine terminals handling container exchanges that can reach 10,000 in a single vessel call? Will truck queues at the gates grow even longer? Is the road and rail infrastructure in New York-New Jersey capable of accommodating the container surges each day? This session will examine how the port authority, terminal operators, truckers, and BCOs are addressing these crucial issues.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Hugh Morley
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Molly Campbell
Director, Port Commerce,
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

 

Jeffrey Bader
CEO,
Golden Carriers Inc.,
and President,
Association of Bi-State Motor Carriers

 

Todd Zaninelli
Director,
International Transportation,
Lowe's Cos.

 
10:30 — 11:00 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: TBD

 
 

 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 

EXTENDED GATES:
THE TIME IS NOW

Location: TBD

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
John Cushing
President and CEO,
PierPass Inc.

 

Dan Smith
Principal,
Tioga Group Inc.

 
12:00 — 1:00 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: TBD

 
 

 
1:00 — 2:00 PM
 

THE NEW CHASSIS REGIME:
ARE BCOS ANY BETTER OFF?

Location: TBD

Chassis deficits at some terminals, and surpluses at other locations in the same harbor, are an all-too-frequent occurrence as ships get bigger and vessel-sharing alliances scatter chassis over multiple terminals. Truckers and their customers pay a large price when drivers must wait for hours for chassis to be freed up at terminals where there are shortages, or when they must to drive to a surplus location to secure a suitable chassis. When chassis issues aggravate other congestion problems, drayage companies will charge BCOs congestion surcharges of as much as $150 or they will refuse loads at certain terminals. These problems could be mitigated, and eventually brought under control, by using data and predictive analytics based on previous chassis movements to more precisely define what the chassis requirements will be every day at every terminal in the harbor. The efforts are underway, but frequent problems with chassis dislocations indicates the industry still has a long way to go. This session will offer a deep dive into technologies that allow intermodal equipment providers to accurately calculate how many chassis are in a region, their locations, and where they will be needed.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Dr. Noel Hacegaba
Managing Director,
Commercial Operations,
Port of Long Beach

 

Keith Lovetro
President and CEO,
TRAC Intermodal

 

Robert Loya
Director of Operations,
California Multimodal LLC

 

Steve Schulein
Vice President, Drayage,
National Retail Transportation Inc.

 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

CHASSIS VISIBILITY:
ARE PREDICTIVE ANALYTICS THE ANSWER?

Location: TBD

Chassis deficits at some terminals, and surpluses at other locations in the same harbor, are an all-too-frequent occurrence as ships get bigger and vessel-sharing alliances scatter chassis over multiple terminals. Truckers and their customers pay a large price when drivers must wait for hours for chassis to be freed up at terminals where there are shortages, or when they must to drive to a surplus location to secure a suitable chassis. When chassis issues aggravate other congestion problems, drayage companies will charge BCOs congestion surcharges of as much as $150 or they will refuse loads at certain terminals. These problems could be mitigated, and eventually brought under control, by using data and predictive analytics based on previous chassis movements to more precisely define what the chassis requirements will be every day at every terminal in the harbor. The efforts are underway, but frequent problems with chassis dislocations indicates the industry still has a long way to go. This session will offer a deep dive into technologies that allow intermodal equipment providers to accurately calculate how many chassis are in a region, their locations, and where they will be needed.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Dr. Man Wo Ng
Assistant Professor of Maritime
and Supply Chain Management,
Old Dominion University

 

Nathanial Seeds
CEO,
American Intermodal Management

 

William Shea
CEO, Direct ChassisLink Inc.

 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: TBD

 
 

 
3:30 — 4:15 PM
 

TRUCKER APPOINTMENTS: A CASE STUDY

Location: TBD

The Harbor Trucking Association and Yusen Terminals in Los Angeles worked for more than a year to develop a trucker-friendly appointment system that satisfies Yusen's needs to adequately plan its labor and equipment needs, but is flexible enough to work for truckers on Southern California’s notoriously congested roadways. It wasn’t easy, but Yusen and the truckers believe the model they rolled out in May is a good one. What did each party contribute to the process, and what were the difficulties they had to overcome? What do BCOs who use the appointment system say about it?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC.com,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Weston LaBar
Executive Director,
Harbor Trucking Association

 

Alan McCorkle
Vice President,
West Coast Operations,
Yusen Terminals Inc.

 

Deborah Ryan
Vice President,
Global Transportation and Logistics,
Ascena Retail Group

 
4:15 — 5:00 PM
 

LONGSHORE LABOR: ROOM TO BREATHE?

Location: TBD

If, as expected, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and Pacific Maritime Association approve a West Coast contract extension, beneficial cargo owners and their service providers will have five years of peace during which they can collaborate on strategies to improve cargo handling and win back market share lost in recent years to East and Gulf Coast ports. An extension also could trigger a quick response to do the same by the International Longshoremen’s Association and U.S. Maritime Alliance on the East and Gulf coasts, giving industry stakeholders relief nationwide. What major challenges do the ILWU and PMA face, and what ideas do their respective leaders, Jim McKenna and Bob McEllrath, have for making the West Coast the port of choice? Note: If the ILWU agrees to a contract extension, and the ILA quickly does the same, we will also invite Dennis Daggett and Dave Adam.

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 


 
5:00 — 6:30 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: TBD

   

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.