December 12 - 13, 2017
Newark, New Jersey

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2016

 

8:00 — 11:00 AM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 

 


 

8:00 — 8:30 AM

 

BREAKFAST

Location: Ballroom Foyer

   

 


 

8:30 — 8:35 AM

 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

8:35 — 9:15 AM

 

DAY 2 KEYNOTE ADDRESS:
OPTIMIZING EFFICIENCY THROUGH COLLABORATION

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

The ocean shipping, marine terminal and harbor trucking industries today are in the same predicament airlines faced 20 years ago, with excess capacity, poor asset utilization, and the inability to command compensatory rates. The airlines corrected these problems through consolidation, improved processes and the use of predictive analytics to achieve higher asset utilization. Each sector of the maritime industry has access to technology and systems that drive greater efficiency within their operations, but they are siloed and their systems don't talk with those of other supply-chain participants. Jonathan Rosenthal, a Southern California transportation investment fund manager and attorney, will launch a day of Port Performance panels on technology and supply-chain efficiency with a gripping presentation on how the fractured port-related transportation industry must abandon its silo mentality and think of itself as an end-to-end system based on a culture of collaboration. The operating systems of ocean carriers, marine terminals, truckers, and warehouses must be linked in an environment of "many talking with many" in order to optimize total system efficiency.

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC.com IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —

Jonathan Rosenthal
Managing Partner,
Saybrook Capital LLC.

 

 


 

9:15 — 10:15 AM

 

TECHNOLOGY I:
MARINE TERMINAL AUTOMATION —
FINDING THE RIGHT FIT

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

The world’s largest ports are turning to automation for a basic reason: The existing marine terminal footprints will be unable to handle growing cargo surges from mega-ships unless the terminals densify their cargo-handling and storage operations. Automation is the only way to accomplish this goal, but automated cargo-handling equipment is dreadfully expensive, and many North American, European and Middle Eastern terminals that have automated their operations have learned that one size does not fit all. What does an automated terminal look like? How does automation improve cargo-handling efficiency and increase density? In what areas has automation failed to live up to its promises? Where will the investment money come from to satisfy the port industry’s huge appetite for capital? A panel of experts will analyze existing automated terminals around the globe.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Dr. Felix Kasiske
Partner,
Hamburg Port Consulting

 

Richard Ceci
Senior Vice President, Technology,
Virginia International Terminals

 


 

10:15 — 10:30 AM

 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Ballroom Foyer

   

 


 

10:30 — 11:30 AM

 

TECHNOLOGY II:
TOOLS TO ENHANCE TRUCK DISPATCHING AND GATE EFFICIENCY

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

Data-driven, real-time programs are in use at key gateways and are producing measurable improvements in truck turn times at marine terminals. The programs use the latest technologies to provide real-time visibility on wait times in truck queues and in truck processing within terminals. Dispatchers using this real-time information can respond on the fly to terminal bottlenecks. Data-driven technology is in use in Los Angeles-Long Beach, where the Harbor Trucking Association has worked with a technology provider that has developed a system to provide truckers and beneficial cargo owners with real-time data on gate queues and bottlenecks within the marine terminals. The ports of Oakland and the Northwest Seaport Alliance also have worked with stakeholders and a technology provider on a system that is in place to provide truckers and BCOs real-time information on marine terminal operating conditions. In both cases, terminal operators, truckers and BCOs can use the technologies to accumulate historical data that uncovers systemic problems at the terminals. This session will analyze best practices to ensure efficient flow into and out of marine terminals.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Chris Lytle
Executive Director,
Port of Oakland

 

Sal Manzo
Co-Founder,
InfoMagnus

 

Taso Zografos
DrayLink Program Director,
Leidos

 

George Boyle
President and CEO,
Quik Pick Express

 


 

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

 

TECHNOLOGY III:
CONNECTING THE MARINE TERMINAL WITH THE DISTRIBUTION CENTER

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

Numerous technology pools are in use and more are being developed in the crucial space between the marine terminal gate and the first point of rest for the container at the local distribution facility. Most every segment of the supply chain, including cargo booking, freight forwarding, truck street turns, equipment control and cargo tracking has access to technology that is taking traditional manually controlled operations to newer, more efficient levels. This panel will discuss how technology is revolutionizing the critical link between the marine terminal and the distribution warehouse.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Kevin Higgins
COO,
Chassis Finder

 

Brett Parker
Co-Founder and President,
Cargomatic

 

Kevin Martin
Senior Vice President, Operations,
The Triangle Group

 

Jonathan Bonny
Vice President of Commercial Development,
Toll Group

 


 

12:30 — 1:30 PM

 

LUNCH

Location: Bacalls & Networking Area

 
 

 


 

1:30 — 2:30 PM

 

PORT PERSPECTIVES:
A DISCUSSION WITH U.S. PORT LEADERS

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

Any number of landmark events are disrupting port operations throughout the U.S., for better and for worse. The opening of the Panama Canal's new locks are bringing East Coast ports further into the mega-ship era. Carrier consolidation and restructuring of alliances are creating winners and losers among ports and terminals, sometimes both within their own harbors. Labor is a continuing concern for some ports, while others are looking to capitalize on relative calm. And, of course, all ports and terminals are looking for solutions through infrastructure upgrades, technology and other means to build efficiency into their operations. This closing conference session will bring together a panel of port CEOs to discuss what we've learned over the previous day-and-a-half, what they see in the way of cargo projections for 2017 and what they are doing to build greater efficiencies into their operations.

 
— SESSION CO-CHAIRS —

Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

James I. Newsome III
President and CEO,
South Carolina Ports Authority

 

Gene Seroka
Executive Director,
Port of Los Angeles

 

Dr. Noel Hacegaba
Chief Commercial Officer and Managing Director,
Port of Long Beach

 

John Wolfe
CEO,
Northwest Seaport Alliance

 

Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port of Houston Authority

 

Bethann Rooney
Assistant. Director,
Port Department,
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

 

John Trent
Senior Director of Strategic Operations and Safety,
Georgia Ports Authority

 

 


 

2:30 — 2:45 PM

 

CLOSING REMARKS WITH AWARDS

Location: Metropolitan Ballroom

Based on the JOC Port Productivity data, JOC Events will recognize the top three ports and top three terminals in North America for 2015.

Top Ports:
No. 1: Port of Baltimore
No. 2: Port of New York and New Jersey
No. 3 (tie): Port of Charleston and Georgia Ports Authority

Top Terminals:
No. 1: APM Terminals, Port Elizabeth
No. 2: Maher Container Terminal, Port of New York and New Jersey
No. 3: North Charleston Terminal, Port of Charleston

 
 

 


 

3:00 — 5:30 PM

 

JOC SHIPPER ROUNDTABLE

Location: Room 206

This exclusive, shipper-only discussion facilitated by JOC.com Executive Editor Mark Szakonyi and Senior Editor Bill Mongelluzzo will bring together beneficial cargo owners in an off-the-record meeting to exchange ideas and potential solutions to the numerous challenges confronting supply chain stakeholders. Among the topics of discussion will be port and terminal efficiency, the impact of ocean carrier consolidation, mega-vessels and new alliances, new and upcoming regulatory requirements, and market and pricing trends.