MONDAY, FEBRUARY 29, 2016

*All sessions will take place at the Long Beach Convention Center unless otherwise indicated.

 

7:00 AM – 7:00 PM

REGISTRATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor


 

7:30 – 8:30 AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: 1st Floor

 

 


 

8:30 – 9:00 AM

WELCOMING REMARKS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

 

PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

CHRIS BROOKS
EXECUTIVE EDITOR,
THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE AND JOC EVENTS,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

THE HONORABLE ROBERT GARCIA
MAYOR, CITY OF LONG BEACH

LORI ANNE GUZMAN
PRESIDENT,
LONG BEACH BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS,
PORT OF LONG BEACH


 

9:00 – 9:45 AM

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

As CEO of DHL Deutsche Post, Dr. Frank Appel has led an expansion that has taken the German express, postal and logistics giant to the top of the freight transportation industry — employing some 480,000 people and operating in more than 220 countries and territories. With a master’s degree in chemistry and Ph.D. in neurobiology, Dr. Appel brings a nontraditional perspective to the industry, embracing the potential for self-driving vehicles, drones and electric mobility. The company, in fact, already has deployed a drone, or “parcelcopter,” in a pilot project to deliver emergency medication from Germany to an island in the North Sea. Dr. Appel will offer his views of the current and future state of the global supply chain, including trans-Pacific shipping, in an opening address that will kick off TPM 2016.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
DR. FRANK APPEL
CEO, DEUTSCHE POST DHL GROUP

— INTRODUCED BY —
JURGEN SORGENFREI
DIRECTOR OF CONSULTING,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE


 

9:45 – 10:15 AM

THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FOR TRADE: A PRESENTATION BY IHS CHIEF ECONOMIST DR. NARIMAN BEHRAVESH

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The global outlook for trade was darkening further as 2016 began, with new weakness in China and global stock markets and global growth forecasts being trimmed. The IHS forecast for global GDP growth in 2016 as of December was 2.9 percent, down from a forecast of 3.4 percent in December 2014. IHS also expects global export growth to slow to 3.3 percent, compared with its December 2014 forecast of 5.2 percent. “Solid growth in the United States and a slight pickup in the pace of Eurozone and Japanese economic activity, along with an expected easing of recessionary pressures in Brazil and Russia, are among the reasons for this moderately upbeat assessment” for 2016 global GDP growth, IHS said in December. “Unfortunately, there is no shortage of downside risks, including high public- and private-sector debt levels, corporate risk aversion, further weakness in China and other emerging markets, and daunting geopolitical risks. This means that the probability of the global economy being stuck in low gear for another year is still uncomfortably high.” IHS Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh will offer TPM attendees his wide-ranging and deeply informed global economic assessment.

 

SPONSORED BY:Cargosphere

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
NEIL BARNI
PRESIDENT, CARGOSPHERE

— SESSION CHAIR —
PETER T. LEACH
EDITOR-AT-LARGE,
THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— GUEST SPEAKER —
DR. NARIMAN BEHRAVESH
CHIEF ECONOMIST, IHS


 

10:15 – 10:45 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

SPONSORED BY:

sponsor


 

10:45 – 11:45 AM

VIEW FROM THE TOP:
A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH INDUSTRY LEADERS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

What does the future hold for trans-Pacific shipping and logistics? What implications will China’s slowdown have on trans-Pacific shipping and logistics? What were the lasting lessons learned from the 2014-15 West Coast labor disruption? Where is the industry headed in 2016 and beyond with larger ships, more port congestion and shippers’ continuing demands for leaner supply chains? Is true supply chain visibility a myth or achievable? These are just some of the questions four CEOs representing different segments of the transportation spectrum — a 3PL, an ocean carrier, a terminal operator and a major retail executive — will answer in this featured panel that not only will kick off TPM 2016, but also set the stage for deeper analysis to come in 2 ½ days of issues- and solutions-based discussion.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— SESSION INTRODUCED BY —
RUSSEL A. GRAEF
PRESIDENT, CONTAINERPORT GROUP, INC.

— INTRODUCED BY —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— SESSION CHAIR —
LORI ANN LAROCCO
SENIOR TALENT PRODUCER, CNBC

— PANELISTS —
ROLF HABBEN JANSEN
CEO, HAPAG-LLOYD AG

JOHN WIEHOFF
CHAIRMAN AND CEO,
C.H. ROBINSON

JACK ONEY
GLOBAL PURCHASES GROUP MANAGER, INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS, PROCTER & GAMBLE

STEPHEN EDWARDS
PRESIDENT & CEO,
GCT GLOBAL CONTAINER TERMINALS INC.


 

11:45 AM – 12:45 PM

2016 CONTAINER SHIPPING OUTLOOK:
ASSESSING THE FUNDAMENTALS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

As 2015 was coming to a close, the trans-Pacific market was taking unexpected twists and turns in the aftermath of the turbulent West Coast labor negotiations. Ocean carriers were doing something they hadn’t done much of since the brief halcyon days of 2010: managing capacity in a way that helped raise ship-utilization levels to 90 percent, up from the low-70s in the spring. At the same time, importers were gearing up for a later-than-usual peak season in the run-up to a holiday shopping season reflecting the still-unspectacular U.S. economy. In Asia, China was struggling to get its economy on track after several quarters of slowing growth and a devaluation that could help spur exports to North America, but create new headwinds for increasingly expensive exports. U.S. West Coast ports, meanwhile, were recovering cargo volumes lost to Canada or East and Gulf Coast ports during the 2014-15 congestion tied to the contentious labor talks. Although the strengthening U.S. economy continues to drive demand for consumer-based imports, container carriers likely will have a tough time filling their ships for the foreseeable future. Ocean carriers had ordered 190 new container ships, totaling more than 2 million TEUs, in the first 9 ½ months of 2015, according to Alphaliner. That new capacity already exceeded the full-year orderbook of any year since 2008. With this in mind, with China in slowdown mode and with surplus Asia-Europe capacity cascading into other trades, how is the supply-demand picture shaping up for 2016 and beyond, and what does that mean for service contracts that will be negotiated in the aftermath of TPM? A panel of renowned container shipping analysts will answer these questions and more, while presenting their trans-Pacific outlook and expectations in this highly anticipated session and annual TPM highlight.

 

SPONSORED BY:Laufer

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MARK LAUFER
CEO, LAUFER GROUP INTERNATIONAL

— SESSION CHAIR —
JIM BLAESER
VICE PRESIDENT,
ALIXPARTNERS

— PANELISTS —
MARIO MORENO
SENIOR ECONOMIST,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

PHILIP DAMAS
DIVISION DIRECTOR,
DREWRY SUPPLY CHAIN ADVISORS

BRANDON R. OGLENSKI
DIRECTOR AND SENIOR EQUITY ANALYST
FOR TRANSPORTATION, BARCLAYS CAPITAL INC.


 

12:00 – 2:00 PM

BOOK SIGNING:
LORI ANN LAROCCO, CNBC SENIOR TALENT PRODUCER

Location: Grand Ballroom, Foyer

After leading a panel discussion with four industry leaders, Lori Ann LaRocco, Senior Talent Producer for CNBC and author of three nonfiction business books, will be signing her latest offering, “Opportunity Knocking.”

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor


 

12:45 – 2:15 PM

LUNCH WITH SPEAKER: TRANSFORMING AN INDUSTRY:
A TED-STYLE TALK ON THE FORCES ALTERING GLOBAL TRANSPORTATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom

Dr. James A. Tompkins is an international authority on supply chain strategy and operations, with particular insight into retailers’ omnichannel distribution strategies and the logistics needed to support them. As founder and CEO of Tompkins International with more than 35 years of experience, he holds an insider’s view into what makes great companies even better. He has written or contributed to more than 30 books, spoken extensively and has been quoted in hundreds of business and industry magazines. In this, his third TPM appearance, Tompkins will discuss how supply chains, including those using ocean container transport, are being transformed under the pressures of factors such as e-commerce and risk avoidance.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— SESSION INTRODUCER —
MARCUS REIMANN
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT,
SEAFREIGHT NORTH AMERICA,
KUEHNE+NAGEL

— INTRODUCED BY —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
JAMES A. TOMPKINS, PH.D.
CEO, TOMPKINS INTERNATIONAL


 

2:15 – 3:00 PM

DISSECTING THE ILWU CONTRACT

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Never mind that it took almost a year to negotiate and the work slowdowns it spawned produced the worst West Coast port congestion since 2002′s 10-day lockout. The 2014-15 ILWU contract will govern labor-management relations and determine West Coast productivity until July 1, 2019. What now? What is the likelihood for further disruption during the life of the contract, as shippers already have witnessed at Oakland in the months since the current contract was agreed upon in February 2015? Representatives from the Pacific Maritime Association and the ILWU will discuss key provisions in the agreement, including how a restructured arbitration system could curtail costly and unnecessary work stoppages; the impact of mandatory chassis inspections by ILWU mechanics on trucker turn times; and how the new contract should reassure terminal operators that costly investment in cargo handling automation and advanced operating systems will yield a favorable return on investment.

 

SPONSORED BY:sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MAC FOREHAND
DIRECTOR,
PERFORMANCE TEAM

— SESSION CHAIR —
BILL MONGELLUZZO
SENIOR EDITOR, TRANS-PACIFIC,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
ROBERT MCELLRATH
INTERNATIONAL PRESIDENT OF
THE INTERNATIONAL LONGSHORE AND
WAREHOUSE UNION (ILWU)

JAMES MCKENNA
PRESIDENT AND CEO,
PACIFIC MARITIME ASSOCIATION


 

3:00 – 3:30 PM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

SPONSORED BY:

sponsor


 

3:30 – 4:30 PM

TERMINAL AUTOMATION

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

With container carriers choosing to invest in colossal ships of nearly 20,000 TEUs to reduce operating costs, terminals must achieve a greater level of cargo-handling automation or already-growing terminal congestion and shipping delays will only worsen. That is why understanding the state and future of automation at North American terminals — several of which are experiencing chronic congestion — is critical for importers, exporters and manufacturers. Opportunities for improvement are abundant. Automated ship-to-shore cranes promise consistent productivity of as many as 40 container moves per crane, per hour. Automated guided vehicles have the ability to move containers efficiently from the foot of the cranes to the stacks, and automated stacking cranes deliver the containers to truckers in a fraction of the time required in manual operations. But terminals must have a business case to invest, and labor must cooperate. And not all automation yields the desired results. This panel will assess the current and likely future state of automation at North American terminals.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
GLENN LIAO
MANAGING DIRECTOR – ASIA,
CATAPULT INTERNATIONAL

— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
MARK SISSON
SENIOR PORT PLANNER AND ANALYST,
AECOM

— PANELISTS —
EDWARD A. DENIKE
PRESIDENT, SSA TERMINALS

ALAN MCCORKLE
VICE PRESIDENT
OF WEST COAST OPERATIONS,
YUSEN TERMINALS/CERES TERMINALS INC.

STEVEN TROMBLEY
MANAGING DIRECTOR,
APM TERMINALS LOS ANGELES

ROLF NIELSEN
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
AND HEAD OF NORTH AMERICA OPERATIONS,
MAERSK LINE


 

3:30 – 4:30 PM

WHAT CHINA’S SLOWDOWN MEANS FOR ITS AMBITIOUS PORT STRATEGY

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Despite excess terminal capacity and slowing exports, China’s ports will need to continue investing as the growing size of mega-vessels forces the major hubs to upgrade port infrastructure and improve hinterland and feeder connections with regional ports. This requirement hasn’t escaped China’s Ministry of Transport, which has a policy in place to upgrade the level and efficiency of port services while connecting the ports with regional economies and logistics networks, and developing designated transshipment hubs and their feeder ports. Will this reduce the efficiency of the container supply chain through reduced direct port calls and longer lead times, or will it bring efficiency into the system by curbing the free-for-all among terminals all chasing high-value direct exports?

 

SPONSORED BY:Port of Halifax

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MIKE SHORT
PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL FORWARDING,
C.H. ROBINSON

— SESSION CHAIR —
GREG KNOWLER
ASIA EDITOR,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
HAKAN BICIL
CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER,
CEVA LOGISTICS

HENRY PRINGLE
VICE PRESIDENT,
ALIXPARTNERS

MATTHEW HOAG
OPERATIONS AND COMMERCIAL DIRECTOR,
DP WORLD, AMERICAS REGION


 

3:30 – 4:30 PM

REFRIGERATED ROUNDTABLE

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Containerized reefer carriers and specialized carriers are often pitted against one another, vying for the coveted business of shippers and their temperature-controlled goods. Yet their service offerings and business models are quite different, if not occasionally complementary. Major container shipping operators are investing heavily in their refrigerated business with new equipment purchases and alliances designed to attract reefer shippers and further increase their market share, which already stands at 75 percent of all perishable seaborne trade. Specialized carriers, meanwhile, are emerging from the economic doldrums with a laser focus on dedicated, expedited and premium service that they believe is a competitive advantage. Executives representing both carrier types will sit down in this roundtable discussion addressing the hot topics surrounding the global reefer market.

 

SPONSORED BY:Port of Halifax

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
PAUL E. DUVOISIN
COMMERCIAL VICE PRESIDENT,
HALIFAX PORT AUTHORITY

— SESSION CHAIR —
LARA L. SOWINSKI
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, SUPPLY CHAIN NETWORK, AC BUSINESS MEDIA

— PANELISTS —
TOM KRAJEWSKI
HEAD OF REFRIGERATED SALES, SEALAND

NICK FAFOUTIS
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
AND CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER,
CMA CGM (AMERICA)


 

3:30 – 4:30 PM

FROM THE PORT TO THE DC AND BEYOND: MAKING THE CONNECTION WORK

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

The segment of the container supply chain connecting the seaport to import distribution center or trans-load and cross-dock facilities, and then from there to regional distribution hubs and retail stores is fraught with challenges. These range from ensuring DCs can receive loads during off hours, chassis availability and intermodal rail service failures and truck capacity shortages. The annual peak shipping season has largely been replaced by micro-peaks with the arrival each week of mega-ships disgorging thousands of containers into distribution networks at the major gateway ports. What are supply chain logisticians, drayage companies and intermodal service providers doing to manage these cargo surges, DC connections to ensure container supply chains are effective beyond the seaport?

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JOHN URBAN
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT,
GENERAL MANAGER, GT NEXUS

— SESSION CHAIR —
WILLIAM CASSIDY
SENIOR EDITOR, TRUCKING,
JOC.COM, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
JON DECESARE
CMC, PRESIDENT,
WORLD CLASS LOGISTICS CONSULTING, INC.
(WCL CONSULTING)

STEVE SCHULEIN
VICE PRESIDENT OF DRAYAGE
AND INDUSTRY RELATIONS,
NATIONAL RETAIL SYSTEMS, INC.

JOHN EDWARDS
DIRECTOR OF CLIENT SERVICES,
SCHNEIDER PORT LOGISTICS


 

4:30 – 5:30 PM

SHIPPING ALLIANCES — THE APPROACHING STORM

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The alliance structure, which had seemed settled last year with four major groupings covering all of the east-west trades for the first time, has been scrambled anew. CMA CGM’s acquisition of APL, announced on Dec. 7, and the impending Cosco-China Shipping merger will dramatically alter the alliance makeup. What is the likely composition of the resulting alliances, and when are the changes likely to occur? How should shippers navigate around these changes? What new supply chain risks are created? Will alliances ever extend their reach into the inland domain, achieving incremental cost savings, as McKinsey, Boston Consulting Group and other experts are urging them to do? Is there any hope for relief from alliances scattering containers among several terminals at Los Angeles-Long Beach? Key industry stakeholders including beneficial cargo owners — those who are ultimately affected — will address these and other issues in a roundtable discussion.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MARIO GIANNOBILE
SENIOR DIRECTOR,
NORTH AMERICA SALES – EAST REGION,
MAERSK

— SESSION CHAIR —
PETER T. LEACH
EDITOR-AT-LARGE,
THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
MARK CHADWICK
EXECUTIVE SOURCING LEADER
FOR GLOBAL LOGISTICS, GE CORPORATE

ROD RISEBOROUGH
CEO, CONTAINER TRADES STATISTICS

STUART SANDLIN
PRESIDENT,
UASC NORTH AMERICA AND VP OF THE AMERICAS

BJORN VANG JENSEN
VICE PRESIDENT,
GLOBAL LOGISTICS, ELECTROLUX


 

4:30 – 5:30 PM

SHIPPER PERSPECTIVES ON THE COLD CHAIN

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Beneficial cargo owners from three industry verticals — food, pharmaceuticals and floral — will share their insights, challenges and strategies for shipping time- and temperature-sensitive commodities around the world. Food shippers see an expanding supply chain that is more complex and subject to regulations, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Food Safety Modernization Act, which impacts temperature monitoring and tracking/tracing of products from farm to store shelf. At the same time, a dynamic modal shift is occurring in the pharmaceutical sector as major drug companies commit more shipments to ocean rather than air cargo. Even floral shippers are capitalizing on the ability of new technologies and reefer equipment designed to support ocean transportation of delicate floral shipments. The challenges in attracting food, pharma and floral shipments, however, range from labor disruptions at gateway ports affecting imports and exports, to inconsistent and improper handling of reefer shipments, compounded by multiple touch points during the ocean journey. Still, the opportunities are ripe for carriers and logistics providers with cold chain capabilities. A panel of seasoned reefer shippers will offer valuable information, best practices and unique perspectives on the global reefer market in this highly anticipated session.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JAMIE OVERLEY
CEO, EAST COAST WAREHOUSE & DISTRIBUTION

— SESSION CHAIR —
LARA L. SOWINSKI
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, SUPPLY CHAIN NETWORK, AC BUSINESS MEDIA

— PANELISTS —
STEVE SCHOMMER
DIRECTOR OF LOGISTICS
AND TRANSPORTATION,
THE SUN VALLEY

PERRY M. BOURNE
DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL
TRANSPORTATION AND RAIL OPERATIONS,
TYSON FOODS

GARY HUTCHINSON
PRESIDENT,
MODALITY SOLUTIONS


 

4:30 – 5:30 PM

SOLVING THE TURN-TIME CRISIS THROUGH MANDATORY APPOINTMENT SYSTEMS

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

Marine terminals at certain North American ports are a nightmare for truckers and their customers. Drivers wait in lines that at times stretch for miles at the gates, and can spend hours within the congested terminals. As NYK Ports CEO Patrick Burgoyne said recently, “The truck driver experience at U.S. terminals has to improve dramatically.” In order to manage truck flows at their facilities and plan their labor and equipment requirements for the day, terminal operators in Vancouver, British Columbia; Los Angeles-Long Beach and New York-New Jersey are implementing mandatory trucker appointment systems. Will they work? Do trucker appointments provide the service and improved gate times they promise? What issues need to get resolved? A panel of experts with experience in trucker appointment systems will discuss the challenges, opportunities and risks that mandatory appointments present for terminals and truckers.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JEREMY CHEE
GM STRATEGY & BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT,
1-STOP CONNECTIONS PTY LTD

— SESSION CHAIR —
JOSEPH BONNEY
SENIOR EDITOR,
TRANS-ATLANTIC, EAST AND GULF COAST,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
JOHN CUSHING
PRESIDENT, PIERPASS INC.

PHILIP DAVIES
PRINCIPAL,
DAVIES TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING INC.

WESTON LABAR
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
HARBOR TRUCKING ASSOCIATION
OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

GERARD J. COYLE
VICE PRESIDENT,
ENVIRONMENTAL & SUSTAINABLE OPERATIONS,
EVANS DELIVERY CO.


 

4:30 – 5:30 PM

INTERMODAL SERVICE ISSUES:
ARE RAIL IMPROVEMENTS SUSTAINABLE?

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

U.S. intermodal service has finally recovered, but the industry faces plenty of challenges that could derail its progress. The threat of port congestion looms over international intermodal services. With trucking rates mild and diesel prices low, railroads face an even more competitive environment for domestic intermodal volume. The potential merger of Canadian Pacific and Norfolk Southern railways, and the resulting tie-up such consolidation would spur, would shake up the Class I industry — and their shipper customers — to a degree not seen since the Staggers Act of 1980. This panel will address the state of rail service, whether recent gains are sustainable and what it means for shippers’ supply chains.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MIKE ERICKSON
PRESIDENT & CEO,
AFMS – GLOBAL LOGISTICS CONSULTING

— SESSION CHAIR —
REYNOLDS HUTCHINS
ASSOCIATE EDITOR,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
CLAUDIA ANDERSEN
IMPORT/EXPORT MANAGER
OF ENTERPRISE LOGISTICS,
1-800FLOWERS.COM

THEODORE PRINCE
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER,
TIGER COOL EXPRESS LLC

MARK T. SIMON
ASSISTANT VICE PRESIDENT,
MARKETING & SALES,
INTERNATIONAL INTERMODAL, UP


 

5:30 – 7:30 PM

WELCOME RECEPTION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

 

SPONSORED BY:
sponsor