February 28 - March 02, 2016
Long Beach, CA

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2016

*All sessions will take place at the Long Beach Convention Center unless otherwise indicated.

 

7:00 AM – 7:00 PM

REGISTRATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor


 

7:30 – 8:15 AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: 1st Floor

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor


 

8:15 – 8:20 AM

WELCOMING REMARKS &
LOG-NET E-COMMERCE EXCELLENCE AWARD

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— PRESENTED BY —
JOHN MOTLEY
CEO AND FOUNDER,
LOG-NET

PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE


 

8:20 – 9:30 AM

CONTAINER WEIGHT VERIFICATION — WILL SHIPPERS BE READY?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Shippers take notice: A new international rule under the international Safety of Life at Sea convention will take effect on July 1, 2016, requiring shippers to present a signed cargo weight verification to ocean carriers prior to containerized cargo being loaded aboard a vessel. Verification can only be obtained through actual weighing using one of two authorized methods. Estimated weights no longer will be permitted, and ocean carriers and terminal operators won’t load cargo without a signed weight verification. How will shippers adjust to this new rule? How will importers with multiple suppliers at multiple origins ensure compliance? How will ports, terminal operators and carriers handle cargo received without a verified weight certification? What steps will stakeholders take to avoid disruptions to supply chains? What are the consequences for noncompliance? A panel of experts will discuss the full range of issues this new rule raises, including implementation plans and challenges as the industry adapts to this major new effort to improve the safety of ships’ operations, cargo and crew.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
ASHLEY CRAIG
PARTNER AND CO-CHAIR,
INTERNATIONAL TRADE, VENABLE LLP

— SESSION CHAIR —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
CHRISTOPHER KOCH
SENIOR ADVISER AND FORMER CEO,
WORLD SHIPPING COUNCIL

MARC BOURDON
PRESIDENT,
CMA CGM (AMERICAS) LLC

DONNA LEMM
VICE PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL SALES,
MALLORY ALEXANDER INTERNATIONAL LOGISTICS

JEFF HOWARD
CHIEF PRODUCT OFFICER,
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF
PRODUCT MANAGEMENT, INTTRA

PAXTON BOWMAN
VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS,
PORTS AMERICA

REAR ADM. PAUL THOMAS
ASSISTANT COMMANDANT
FOR PREVENTION POLICY,
U.S. COAST GUARD


 

9:30 – 10:30 AM

LONGSHORE LABOR — WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

After the debacle on the West Coast tied to the ILWU negotiations, which resulted in huge economic damage, what can be done to address longshore labor relations so shippers aren’t put through the uncertainty and disruption experienced in late 2014 and early 2015? The West Coast disruption put several things into motion. Talk of a multi-year extension of the East Coast longshore agreement is picking up steam, with one ILA leader saying, “I thing we’re going to get it done.” On the West Coast, the ILWU Office Clerical Workers division, the source of disruption in prior years, signed individual agreements with a number of employers. In Washington D.C., several bills aiming to diminish the potential for disruption have been introduced in Congress, though none have passed. Where is this all headed? Was the recent ILWU round a watershed that will reduce the potential for port disruption in future years, or a harbinger for more when future contracts get negotiated? Veteran industry negotiators will tell us where they believe U.S. waterfront labor relations are headed.

 

SPONSORED BY:sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
DAVE THOMAS
DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS,
MARYLAND PORT ADMINISTRATION,
PORT OF BALTIMORE

— SESSION CHAIR —
BILL MONGELLUZZO
SENIOR EDITOR, TRANS-PACIFIC,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
ANTHONY A. SCIOSCIA
PRINCIPAL,
ANTHONY A. SCIOSCIA MANAGEMENT LLC

DAVID ARIAN
VICE PRESIDENT,
LOS ANGELES BOARD OF HARBOR COMMISSIONERS

CHRIS LYTLE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
PORT OF OAKLAND

JOHN J. FAGEAUX JR.
PRESIDENT,
ILWU LOCAL 63-OFFICE
CLERICAL UNIT

STEPHEN BERRY
PARTNER-EMPLOYMENT LAW DEPARTMENT,
PAUL HASTINGS LLP


 

10:30 – 11:00 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

SPONSORED BY:

sponsor

sponsor

sponsor

sponsor


 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

HOW THE WEST COAST LABOR DISPUTE CHANGED BCO ATTITUDES AND PERCEPTIONS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The impact of the longshore labor dispute on the West Coast had a profound effect on shippers’ financials as well as their thinking about risk. The Federal Reserve has estimated that two-tenths of a point of growth was slashed from first-quarter 2015 GDP. Behind those numbers are exporters who got burned by lost sales and worthless inventory and retailers and other importers who had to explain unanticipated revenue and cost impacts to investors. Some cargo that was diverted from the West Coast hasn’t returned. Congress especially farm-state senators and representatives took notice, and a new port metrics law is now on the books. What lasting lessons did shippers learn? What are the long-term implications from an episode that has slipped into the past but is still very much on the minds of shippers?

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JASON HILSENBECK
PRESIDENT,
LOADMATCH & DRAYAGE.COM

— SESSION CHAIR —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
PETER FRIEDMANN
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
AGRICULTURE TRANSPORTATION COALITION

JONATHAN GOLD
VICE PRESIDENT OF SUPPLY CHAIN
AND CUSTOMS POLICY,
NATIONAL RETAIL FEDERATION


 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

VENTURE CAPITAL’S RUSH TO TRANSPORTATION AND LOGISTICS: WHY THE ATTRACTION?

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

Venture capital is pouring into transportation and logistics startups, with investors seeing opportunities to extract significant value by attacking inefficiencies existing throughout the supply chain. The amount of venture funding for transportation-focused ventures overall quadrupled in 2014 to $7 billion, and doubled to $14 billion in 2015, according to Volvo Group Venture Capital. There is significant growth in the U.S., for sure, but notable growth is coming from China and India as well. The bulk of venture capital is flowing to markets that will increase efficiency, collaboration and liquidity; connected services to lower fuel costs, increase safety and diagnose issues remotely; and analytics services that utilize data from the different sources within fleets to enable better decisions. Venture capitalists will discuss the opportunities — and risks — they see in this market.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
KIM LE
STRATEGIC ALLIANCE DIRECTOR, CARGOSMART LIMITED

— SESSION CHAIR —
CHRIS BROOKS
EXECUTIVE EDITOR,
THE JOURNAL OF COMMERCE AND JOC EVENTS,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
RENEE DIRESTA
VICE PRESIDENT OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT,
HAVEN

JOHN GOLOB
CEO AND CO-FOUNDER,
LANETIX


 

11:00 AM – 12:00 PM

PRINCE RUPERT, A MODEL FOR COOPERATION THAT BENEFITS SUPPLY CHAINS

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Container volumes at Prince Rupert through the first seven months of 2015 were up 32 percent year-over-year, illustrating how the Pacific Northwest port is seen as an effective and trouble-free gateway for cargo diverted away from the labor difficulties along U.S. West Coast in 2014 and early 2015. Shippers who have been using Prince Rupert since it opened in 2007 already are familiar with the port’s ability to handle steadily growing volumes with minimal disruption. What shippers may be less familiar with is the close, operational coordination between the ocean carrier, marine terminal, Canadian National Railway and the Prince Rupert Port Authority that leads to a consistently effective handoff of containers through the port, most of them bound for the U.S. Midwest. This case study will illustrate what makes this port a unique and growing player in the North American port market.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
MARK SZAKONYI
EXECUTIVE EDITOR, JOC.COM,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
JEAN-JACQUES RUEST
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AND
CHIEF MARKETING OFFICER,
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY

MATTHEW LEECH
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
AND MANAGING DIRECTOR,
DP WORLD, AMERICAS REGION

MATTHEW HILL
NORTH AMERICAN DIRECTOR OF
TRANSPACIFIC & OCEANIA TRADES,
MAERSK LINE

DON KRUSEL
PRESIDENT AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER,
PRINCE RUPERT PORT AUTHORITY

PAT FLYNN-CHERENZIA
SR. DIRECTOR,
GLOBAL LOGISTICS AND FULFILLMENT,
MICROSOFT


 

12:00 – 1:15 PM

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency Ballroom

 

 


 

1:15 – 2:15 PM

THE CHANGING FACE OF DRAYAGE AND WAREHOUSE LABOR

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

The independent contractor, non-union labor model has dominated harbor drayage and warehouse-distribution industries since deregulation in 1980, but the Teamsters union in recent years has aggressively challenged that model. Southern California is the epicenter of these changes, and the Teamsters have scored some important victories at the largest U.S. port complex. Organizing efforts, however, have spread to other ports on the East and West coasts. In another potentially explosive development, the Teamsters last year formed a partnership with the Warehouse Workers Resource Center in Ontario, California, that could lead to organizing warehouse workers in the lucrative distribution hub in the Inland Empire. Should the drayage and warehouse sectors fear, or welcome, these developments? Does this mean another labor union having a chokehold on international container trade, creating a new element of unpredictability at U.S. ports?

 

SPONSORED BY:NRS

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JUAN ARRIOLA
VICE PRESIDENT, SUPPLY CHAIN,
NATIONAL RETAIL SYSTEMS, INC.

— SESSION CHAIR —
WILLIAM CASSIDY
SENIOR EDITOR, TRUCKING,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
VICTOR LA ROSA
PRESIDENT, CEO AND CO-FOUNDER,
TOTAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

SHEHERYAR KAOOSJI
DIRECTOR,
LAANE’S PROJECT FOR CLEAN AND SAFE PORTS

FRED POTTER
INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT-AT-LARGE
AND DIRECTOR OF THE PORT DIVISION,
INTERNATIONAL BROTHERHOOD
OF TEAMSTERS

CURTIS WHALEN
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
INTERMODAL MOTOR CARRIERS CONFERENCE AT
THE AMERICAN TRUCKING ASSOCIATIONS


 

1:15 – 2:15 PM

CONSTRUCTING THE COLD CHAIN OF THE FUTURE

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

An expert group of executives from key ports, cold storage operators, transportation providers, equipment manufacturers and technology providers will reveal their vision for building an integrated cold chain for the 21st century — one that offers real-time end-to-end visibility, optimizes shelf life, enhances sustainability, reduces food waste and expands new frontiers for temperature-controlled cargoes worldwide. What types of infrastructure investments geared specifically toward the reefer trade are underway at ports? How does the Panama Canal expansion figure into the mix? How are cold storage providers expanding their suite of services to support new cold chain demands? Can innovative rail services open up new transportation opportunities for temperature-controlled shipments? What are the game-changing technologies that will facilitate longer, safer and more visible cold chains for products moving in and out of developed and emerging economies alike? How will the global reefer market evolve in the medium to long term? The panel will address these topics and more in this information-packed, forward-looking session.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
PETER KLAUS
VICE PRESIDENT, LINER SALES,
NORTH CAROLINA PORTS

— SESSION CHAIR —
AL TAMA
PRODUCT MANAGEMENT DIRECTOR,
CONTAINER AND PORT SOLUTIONS,
ORBCOMM

— PANELISTS —
DR. BURAK S. AYATA
REGIONAL DIRECTOR SEA &
AIR REEFER LOGISTICS,
KUEHNE + NAGEL IN NORTH AMERICA

JAMIE OVERLEY
CEO, EAST COAST WAREHOUSE

TONG ZHU
CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER,
CONTAINER & REAL ESTATE,
THE NORTHWEST SEAPORT ALLIANCE

JAVIER BOTELLO
DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT,
AMERICOLD


 

1:15 – 2:15 PM

TIMING OUT THE EXPORTS TURNAROUND

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The strong dollar, slowing growth in China, Japan and other trading partners and collapsing commodity prices devastated U.S. exports to Asia the past year. In the first half of 2015, containerized exports to Asia declined more than 6 percent year-over-year, according to data from PIERS, with expectations for a full-year drop of 3 percent. Despite these developments, PIERS forecasts call for a turnaround in 2016 and 2017, with westbound Pacific volumes growing at annual rates in the 5.5 to 6.5 percent range. China’s growing middle class still provides opportunity for U.S. agribusiness. Expanding manufacturing in Southeast Asia and the Indian subcontinent will look to North America for raw materials and components. Improving living standards throughout Asia will provide new opportunities for U.S. exporters of products designed for the middle class consumer. In this session, economists, shippers and logistics firms will discuss where these opportunities will be found.

 

SPONSORED BY:

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
MOLLY CAMPBELL
DIRECTOR, PORT COMMERCE,
PORT AUTHORITY OF NY & NJ

— SESSION CHAIR —
EDWARD ZANINELLI
PRESIDENT, GRIFFIN CREEK CONSULTING

— PANELISTS —
DR. WALTER KEMMSIES
CHIEF ECONOMIST,
MOFFATT & NICHOL

LAWRENCE J. GROSS
PARTNER AND SENIOR CONSULTANT,
FTR ASSOCIATES AND PRESIDENT,
GROSS TRANSPORTATION CONSULTING


 

2:15 – 2:45 PM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

SPONSORED BY:

sponsor


 

2:45 – 3:45 PM

MANAGING RISK —
FORMULATING A BUSINESS CONTINUITY STRATEGY

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

Risk mitigation within international supply chains has never been a more relevant or even urgent priority for companies moving goods internationally. Events such as the explosion at China’s Port of Tianjin, the sinking of the MOL Comfort, the harsh 2013 and 2014 winters and disruptive West Coast longshore negotiations illustrate the need for shippers to have effective and up-to-date risk mitigation plans. One major consumer products shipper told the 2015 TPM Asia conference that risk was the No. 1 issue “keeping me up at night.” What lessons did shippers learn from the recent disruptions? How can they be prepared for the next disruptive event? A panel of shippers will discuss their experiences.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
EDWARD R. SANDS
GLOBAL PRACTICE LEADER
AND PRINCIPAL DIRECTOR OF LOGISTICS,
ACCENTURE

— PANELISTS —
BRIAN KIPPLEY
GROUP MANAGER OF
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORTATION,
TARGET

SIVA NARAYANAN
DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL
OPERATIONS AND WAREHOUSING,
SOLVAY CHEMICALS

STEVE FLUNKER
DIRECTOR OF INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS,
SEARS HOLDINGS


 

2:45 – 3:45 PM

THE NEW CHASSIS REGIME

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

No, we’re unfortunately not done talking about chassis. Five years since ocean carriers began selling their chassis fleets, having sold 80 percent of their fleets according to a recent estimate, chassis remain a bottleneck at the two largest container gateways, Los Angeles-Long Beach and New York-New Jersey. In Southern California, the so-called pool of pools, or gray fleet, has taken effect. Still, one carrier CEO recently complained bitterly about there being too few chassis to meet demand at the largest U.S. port complex. Alliances’ demand for inter-terminal moves undoubtedly play a role. A simmering legal conflict involving truckers’ contention that the ILWU has no role in chassis maintenance still could blow up. In New York-New Jersey, the delayed introduction of a portwide chassis pool was believed to be on track for a January 2016 launch. How do BCOs work through this complex, troubled yet indispensable element of the supply chain? A panel of chassis users will discuss their experiences and where they believe the chassis business needs to go.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
JON MONROE
CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER,
DE-WELL GROUP

— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
STEVE RUBIN
CEO, ITS TECHNOLOGIES & LOGISTICS

— PANELISTS —
FRED JOHRING
PRESIDENT, GOLDEN STATE EXPRESS

JASON MURNIGKEIT
VICE PRESIDENT OF OPERATIONS,
TRICAP INTERNATIONAL, LLC

KEN KELLAWAY
PRESIDENT AND CEO,
ROADONE INTERMODALOGISTICS


 

2:45 – 3:45 PM

EXPORTER PERSPECTIVES – A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The life of an exporter in a market dominated by imports is rife with risk. Equipment repositioning, irregular transportation schedules and other supply chain challenges make exporting difficult under any circumstances. It only becomes more so when overseas markets such as China weaken, when the high value of the dollar makes it difficult for U.S. products to compete and when disruption related to weather, natural disasters or events such as the 2014-15 West Coast port debacle hit. But the dialogue can vary greatly from export segment to export segment. What impacts agricultural interests, for example, may not touch automotive interests. In this roundtable discussion, a panel of export interests representing a variety of industries will analyze the outlook for their products, what markets are showing promise and which aren’t, and the initiatives they’re undertaking to resolve their supply chain challenges.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
COREY RHODES
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES, NORTH AMERICA,
AMBERROAD

— SESSION CHAIR —
EDWARD ZANINELLI
PRESIDENT, GRIFFIN CREEK CONSULTING

— PANELISTS —
DON LAKE
VICE PRESIDENT OF GLOBAL OPERATIONS,
DUNAVANT LOGISTICS GROUP

MIKKO TOIVANEN
BRANCH MANAGER,
ALBATRANS INC., LOS ANGELES BRANCH

THOMAS LORENZO
EXPORT MARINE LOGISTICS MANAGER,
DOMTAR PAPER


 

3:45 – 4:45 PM

CREATING BCO-CARRIER RELATIONSHIPS THAT WORK IN THE REAL WORLD

Location: Room 104B, 1st Floor

Even at a time of chronic overcapacity and rate competition among container lines, it’s critical for shippers and carriers to work effectively with each other on a daily basis. It’s still important, for example, for a beneficial cargo owner to be a good customer to its selected carriers in order to secure reliable service and get real help in urgent situations. Effective BCOs do this by offering reliable long- and short-term forecasts, avoiding phantom bookings, paying bills on time and engaging in other practices that this panel will discuss. At the same time, even while offering competitive rates, shipping lines can improve their standing as a carrier of choice with key shippers by giving them go-to contacts, resulting in a marriage of stengths that delivers sustainable long-term value to both parties. Veteran industry leader Chas Deller will lead a panel of shipper and carrier veterans describing their real-world experiences.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
CHAS DELLER
CEO & CHAIRMAN,
10XOCEANSOLUTIONS.COM

— PANELISTS —
ARTHUR BREDEHOFT
GLOBAL OWNER-KEY ACCOUNT SALES,
SAFMARINE

GREG KRUEGER
VICE PRESIDENT (USA SALES),
YANG MING (AMERICA)

ANDREW GILLESPIE
DIRECTOR GLOBAL LOGISTICS,
ANSELL LIMITED

PETER GOULDING
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL LOGISTICS,
THE ESTEE LAUDER COMPANIES INC.


 

3:45 – 4:45 PM

SUPPLY CHAIN VISIBILITY: HOW FAR HAVE WE COME AND HOW FAR DO WE HAVE TO GO?

Location: Room 103, 1st Floor

True cargo visibility achieved via logistics technology remains an elusive goal for many shippers, but progress, however slow, is being made. What is the scorecard for visibility from the West Coast port disruption last year? What is the evolution from hard-wired EDI connections to cloud-based information and communities? How is visibility made operationally relevant — it’s one thing to know where your stuff is, for example, but what do you do with that information? How do you drive it into areas such as assurance of supply, omnichannel retail, regional logistics and customer service? How are visibility systems interacting with related systems such as TMS and ERP, extending their reach into global partner communities? This panel will discuss.

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
ADAM COMPAIN
CEO, CLEARMETAL INC.

— SESSION CHAIR —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
ANDY SOUDERS
SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT
OF PRODUCTS AND STRATEGY, SAVI

JOHN URBAN
EVP AND GM,
GT NEXUS

BJORN VANG JENSEN
VICE PRESIDENT,
GLOBAL LOGISTICS, ELECTROLUX


 

3:45 – 4:45 PM

THE NEW PANAMA CANAL — WHAT IT MEANS

Location: Room 102, 1st Floor

There is consensus that most North Asia-to-U.S. East Coast services will shift back to the Panama Canal from the Suez after the expansion — it’s a faster route by several days and requires three or four fewer ships compared to a Suez service, saving carriers tens of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Less clear is how the expansion will impact Asia-to-East Coast rates and to what degree it will spark further East Coast diversions. As of October, all-water spot rates were $2,670 per FEU, according to the Shanghai Containerized Rate Index. When 8,000- to 9,000-TEU ships replace the 4,000- to 5,000-TEU workhorses currently deployed in all-water Panama services, some believe these rates will drop alongside carrier operating costs. How much those rates drop will be critical in determining the costs of East Coast supply chains for BCOs, and how much cargo shifts from the West Coast to the East Coast beyond what already was diverted as a result of West Coast labor negotiations. This panel will examine the potential impact.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
MARK SZAKONYI
EXECUTIVE EDITOR, JOC.COM,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
JOHN WHEELER
VICE PRESIDENT OF CARRIER SALES,
SOUTH CAROLINA PORTS AUTHORITY

DEAN TRACY
MANAGING DIRECTOR,
GLOBAL INTEGRATED SOLUTIONS

DAN SMITH
PRINCIPAL, TIOGA GROUP


 

3:45 – 4:45 PM

MEGA-VESSELS AND RISK — A TICKING TIME BOMB?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

A 19,000-TEU vessel capsizes and sinks, resulting in a total loss of the vessel and its cargo. If this nightmare scenario were to occur, the total loss would exceed $1 billion, half of that being the value of the cargo, according to Allianz. It’s hardly inconceivable given that no captain can say for certainty what dangerous cargoes are aboard their ship due to faulty shipping documentation. “The arrival of such ‘mega-ships’ is accompanied by concerns about increasing risk, safety issues, salvage difficulties,” Allianz said in its 2015 Shipping Review. Removal of heavy fuel oil and containers from a stricken vessel, where to tow a deep-draft ship and how to extinguish a fire deep within a hold: All of these are issues importers, exporters and manufacturers must be aware of when subjecting their supply chains to the risks of modern-day container shipping. A large BCO told the TPM Asia Conference in October that his containers have been impacted by 35 vessel incidents in recent years. A panel of experts will explore this issue in depth, using the experience of real-life disasters to explain best practices for cargo owners.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
RICHARD CLAYTON
CHIEF MARITIME CORRESPONDENT, IHS FAIRPLAY, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
CAPTAIN MICHAEL LLOYD,
RD**, MNM, FNI, RNR

CAPTAIN, MINES RESCUE MARINE LTD.

CAPTAIN ANDREW KINSEY
SENIOR MARINE RISK CONSULTANT,
ALLIANZ GLOBAL CORPORATE & SPECIALTY


 

5:30 – 7:30 PM

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Pool Deck

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor