February 28 - March 02, 2016
Long Beach, CA

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

*All sessions will take place at the Hyatt Regency Long Beach unless otherwise indicated.

 

8:00 – 11:00 AM

REGISTRATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

SPONSORED BY: sponsor


 

8:00 – 9:00 AM

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Regency Ballroom Foyer

 

 


 

9:00 – 10:00 AM

CHOOSING THE RIGHT PORT GATEWAYS

Location: Regency Ballroom ABC

As the last year showed, which port gateways you as a beneficial cargo owner chooses can have a huge impact on the reliability of your supply chain. Even putting longshore labor volatility aside, how efficient a port is in terms of chassis availability, rail connections, truck turn times and other factors such as highway access can have a material impact on lean supply chains that have little tolerance for disruption of any kind. The four-corners strategy implemented by several major retailers is in part tied to risk avoidance. Two import BCOs along with the CEOs of the Northwest Seaport Alliance and the Georgia Ports Authority will discuss how they manage the critically important handoff from the marine terminal operator to inland modes.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
BILL MONGELLUZZO
SENIOR EDITOR, TRANS-PACIFIC,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
JOHN WOLFE
CEO, PORT OF TACOMA

CURTIS FOLTZ
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR,
GEORGIA PORTS AUTHORITY

RICHARD PERKET
SENIOR DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL LOGISTICS,
CHRISTOPHER AND BANKS CORPORATION

BILL ROONEY
VICE PRESIDENT,
NORTH AMERICAN TRADE MANAGEMENT,
KUEHNE + NAGEL


 

9:00 – 10:00 AM

FINDING NEW TALENT — ASK NOT WHAT MILLENNIALS CAN DO FOR YOU, BUT WHAT YOU CAN DO FOR THEM

Location: Regency Ballroom DEF

It’s a common problem with no easy solution: You’re the department head of a major shipping company with a talented, but aging Baby Boomer staff. Where do you turn to ensure a smooth transition as, one by one, your staff — and decades of experience and talent — prepares to call it a career? For many, the answer lies in a youth movement, but attracting talented, driven, growth-oriented employees under 40 comes with numerous risks, the biggest of which is that you can’t afford to make a hiring mistake. It also comes with all the stereotypes of the Millennial Generation: It wants too much, too soon. It values personal gain over hard work. It is lazy. It can’t communicate effectively. It is narcissistic. But there is no denying that huge talent exists in today’s youth, and the gap often exists because employers fail to open up to new ways of doing business. In this unique workshop, several Millennials representing different segments of the global supply chain will share their thoughts and experiences about what they look for in a company, a career and their vision of the future of freight transportation.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
SUSAN SHEY DVONCH
PARTNER,
SHEY-HARDING EXECUTIVE SEARCH

— PANELISTS —
JEREMY BRIDGES
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND ARBITRATION,
PACIFIC MARITIME ASSOCIATION

STEPHANIE ESPARZA
SUPERINTENDENT, PORTS AMERICA

ELIZABETH GASTON
SALES AND MARKETING,
ABILITY TRI-MODAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

RYAN MOLINARO
TERMINAL MANAGER,
WEST BASIN CONTAINER TERMINAL-LOS ANGELES

GENE HARRIS
MARINE TERMINAL OPERATIONS PROFESSIONAL


 

10:00 – 10:20 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Regency Ballroom Foyer

 

 


 

10:20 – 11:20 AM

SERVICE CONTRACT STRATEGY AMID
A CHANGING CARRIER LANDSCAPE

Location: Regency Ballroom ABC

The landscape for shippers that negotiate direct carrier contracts is shifting as consolidation gathers steam and alliances are thrown into question amid chronic overcapacity. As this occurs, shippers should be reviewing their approach to tendering (in terms of how many carriers, how many rounds and criteria to determine carrier allocations); cost benchmarking (how to use cost data before and after the tender, whether to set “target rates” or not, how to use data to determine how much to push carriers during negotiations); and defining carrier performance and service level definitions and monitoring during the term of the contract. Other issues worth considering are: How do strategies change or evolve at a time of consolidation? What role do relationships play, even given greater emphasis on metrics? What role does the shipper/BCO’s reputation with the carrier play and to what extent is it important for the BCO to nurture this? What danger is there for a BCO in asking for post-contract rate reductions later in the year once the spot rate has tanked? Is there a concern about capacity availability anywhere on the horizon and does this play into the picture at all? How does a carrier’s alliance participation figure into negotiations? In what kinds of situations does it make sense to negotiate for ocean space with a 3PL? This case study will address these topics directly.

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
PHILIP DAMAS
DIRECTOR, DREWRY SUPPLY CHAIN ADVISORS

SIMON PREISLER
DIRECTOR OF LOGISTICS,
CENTRAL NATIONAL-GOTTESMAN INC.

ANDREW GILLESPIE
DIRECTOR OF GLOBAL LOGISTICS,
ANSELL LIMITED


 

10:20 – 11:20 AM

AN INNOVATIVE APPROACH TO HIRING AND ATTRACTING HARBOR TRUCK DRIVERS

Location: Regency Ballroom DEF

Faced with an aging workforce, harbor trucking companies must seek new and innovative ways to attract younger drivers and prepare them for the rigors of harbor drayage. The Harbor Trucking Association of Southern California is partnering with Long Beach City College on a program that trains applicants how to operate in the challenging goods movement environment of the largest U.S. port complex. Learn how the course works, and hear from a trucking company executive who has hired graduates of the program.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
BILL MONGELLUZZO
SENIOR EDITOR, TRANS-PACIFIC,
JOC, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
MICHAEL MAYOR
PRESIDENT, MAYOR LOGISTICS INC (MLI),
CURRENTLY SERVES AS THE
VICE PRESIDENT OF THE
HARBOR TRUCKING ASSOCIATION, (HTA)

DANA FRIEZ
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT TRAINING MANAGER,
LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE


 

11:20 AM – 12:20 PM

SHIPPERS ASSOCIATIONS — A TOOL TO ACHIEVE COMPETITIVE OCEAN PRICING

Location: Regency Ballroom ABC

For small to mid-sized shippers seeking to gain pricing leverage with container carriers, joining a shipper association may be the answer. The main benefits of membership are the access to competitive market pricing made possible through the association’s pooled volumes as well as avoiding mark-ups on ocean freight and direct invoices from carriers. Shippers associations are a growing presence in U.S. ocean freight, with approximately 75 operating today and controlling 4 to 5 percent of total U.S. export cargo and 2 to 3 percent of import cargo. In this case study, administrators of the L&P Shippers Association, founded in 2008, will lead a discussion with several members. The association controls approximately 50,000 TEUs annually, maintains five major carrier contracts and has approximately 125 individual shipper members.

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
PETER TIRSCHWELL
SENIOR DIRECTOR, CONTENT,
IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS —
WAYNE KAMINSKI
VICE PRESIDENT,
L&P GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS

MIKE MCDONIEL
VICE PRESIDENT OF
PURCHASING AND LOGISTICS,
PACE INDUSTRIES

THOMAS DROMEY
CLIENT SOLUTIONS DIRECTOR,
TRANSPORTATION INSIGHT


 

11:20 AM – 12:20 PM

CARRIER SURCHARGES — WHAT ARE THE TRENDS AND HOW SHOULD YOU MANAGE THIS ASPECT OF CARRIER PRICING?

Location: Regency Ballroom DEF

The effect of carrier surcharges on ocean rates and the complications that arise from managing frequent updates have created one of the most impactful industry trends in years. Not long ago, updates to surcharges were a monthly or annual occurrence. Today, keeping on top of updates is a daily struggle for pricing managers at companies of all sizes. For shippers and forwarders alike, gaining a clear understanding of the “what” and “why” behind ocean tariff surcharges is a key step to managing them properly. This workshop will present unique insight into surcharge trends using current market data. It also will include in-depth discussion about relevant industry issues involving surcharges. Additional topics will include reasons behind the dynamic nature of surcharges, new and most frequently applied surcharges, why only some surcharges “stick” and ideas for negotiating surcharges with carriers.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
MATT MOTSICK
CEO, CATAPULT INTERNATIONAL

— PANELISTS —
JOHN POURNARAS
DIRECTOR OF SURCHARGES,
CATAPULT INTERNATIONAL