February 26 - March 01, 2017
Long Beach, CA

Monday, February 27, 2017

All sessions will take place in the Long Beach Convention Center*

 

 
7:00 AM — 6:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOMING REMARKS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

 

 
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Stuart Strachan
Senior Vice President,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Lori Ann Guzman
President,
Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners

 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

OPENING KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Six years ago, Bradley Jacobs invested $150 million in a trucking, forwarding and brokerage firm called Express-1 Expedited Solutions. Now after 17 acquisitions including Pacer International, Conway, and Norbert Dentressangle, XPO Logistics the company is a $15 billion global logistics and transportation juggernaut traded on the New York Stock Exchange, with supply chain, e-commerce fulfillment, and contract logistics subsidiaries across North America and Europe, as well as asset- and non-asset trucking, intermodal and freight forwarding subsidiaries. Its business now spans multiple continents and countries, and its broad portfolio crosses modal and market lines. XPO's rapid growth is transformative for the logistics business as a whole, showing how multiple segments in the end-to-end universe from ocean forwarding to last mile can be rolled up into a cohesive and profitable whole. In building XPO Jacobs has defied expectations, broken boundaries and refused to accept limitations on his vision within a more conservative marketplace. As the leader of one of the largest, most diverse and increasingly global logistics companies, Jacobs will share his outlook for a business still aggressively expanding and discuss evolving solutions and options for international shippers struggling to meet increasingly complex distribution challenges.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 
 
— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
Bradley Jacobs
Chairman and CEO,
XPO Logistics

 
9:45 — 10:30 AM
 
 
 

THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FOR TRADE FOLLOWING THE TRUMP VICTORY:
A PRESENTATION BY IHS MARKIT CHIEF ECONOMIST NARIMAN BEHRAVESH

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The political earthquakes of 2016 have upended conventional thinking about the global economy and have—ironically—brightened the outlook, IHS Markit Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh said before the TPM conference. “The expectation that the Trump administration will enact sizeable fiscal stimulus has increased optimism about US and global growth, as well as trade growth. This, in turn, has pushed US stock indexes to record highs, while pushing up both US interest rates (with a resulting rout in the bond market) and the dollar,” he said. Among his predictions for 2017: The US economy will accelerate—even before any Trump stimulus; Europe’s economic momentum will slow a little, primarily because of Brexit and political uncertainties; Japan’s growth will be low and steady, helped by a weaker yen; China’s growth will grind down further, led by a housing construction slowdown; Emerging markets will do better, despite recent financial market pressures; Commodity prices will continue their upward trend; Inflation rates will move up in many parts of the world; US interest rates will keep rising—also pulling rates up in some emerging markets; The US dollar will appreciate further; The level of uncertainty has risen, but the risks of recession remain low-- IHS Markit estimates that the risk of either a US or global recession in 2017 is no more than 25%. He added that, In the end, the outlook for global GDP and trade growth will depend on whether policies in the United States and Europe will be determined by pro-growth populism or protectionist populism. In the former case (which seems most likely),the outlook of the world economy and trade will be bright. In the latter case, the risks of a recession would be high. In a wide ranging solo presentation at TPM, Behravesh will discuss the U.S. and global economic outlook with a particular focus on the impact on container trade.

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Mark Laufer
CEO,
Laufer Group International

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
Nariman Behravesh
Chief Economist,
IHS Markit

 
10:30 — 11:00 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
11:00 AM — 12:30 PM
 
 
 

TRANSFORMATION IN CONTAINER SHIPPING: IT'S FINALLY HAPPENING SO WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Even before the Oct. 31 announcement that the three Japanese shipping companies would merge their container operations, and the Dec. 1 announcement that Maersk would acquire Hamburg Sud, 2016 was already the most transformational year they industry had ever seen. COSCO and China Shipping merged. CMA CGM acquired APL, Hapag-Lloyd was acquiring UASC and Hanjin collapsed. That led to a massive alliance restructuring that will take effect in the first half of 2017. On top of that the parent world’s largest carrier, Maersk, announced plans to divest its energy businesses and significantly refocus its transportation business to accelerate digital transformation ad achieve synergies across container shipping, terminals and logistics.

Against a backdrop of slowing global trade, likely exacerbated by the Trump victory, and overcapacity that most analysts say will remain in place at least for the next two years if not longer, shippers are facing a completely new environment in 2017 with many unknowns. Trans-Pacific spot rates following the Aug. 31 Hanjin collapse were over $1,800 per 40-foot container, more than two and a half times the level in June when they were below $700. Given all these moving parts, what is the pricing and demand outlook for 2017? How will the new alliance rollouts impact service? Is there more M&A in the industry yet to come?

A series of speakers will address these issues head on, setting the stage for the extensive discussions at TPM that will follow.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Neil Barni
President,
CargoSphere

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Mario O. Moreno
Senior Economist,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 
Ronald D. Widdows
Executive Chairman,
American Intermodal Management; Chairman,
World Shipping Council;
Former CEO,
NOL/APL

 

Tan Hua Joo
Executive Consultant,
Alphaliner

 
12:30 — 2:00 PM
 

LUNCH WITH SPEAKER

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Bob Mihok
President and CEO,
Kuehne + Nagel North American

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
John McLaurin
President,
Pacific Merchant Shipping Association

 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 
 
 

VIEW FROM THE TOP: A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH INDUSTRY LEADERS

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Where is the industry now headed? What does the future look like following the transformational year of 2016, which included not only unprecedented container carrier upheaval -- the latest being the Dec. 1 Maersk/Hamburg Sud deal -- but historic developments such as the Brexit vote and Trump elections that will inevitably affect the growth of trade volumes. What are the lasting lessons from the Hanjin collapse? What will the new emerging mega-carrier organizations like the so-called Japan Line look like and how will they behave in the market? What new minefields will shippers confront in 2017? How do the leaders of a leading shipper, carrier, 3PL and terminal operator see the industry evolving for their businesses and for BCOs? This panel of leaders will address these and many other topics in what will be a wide-ranging, open and engaging discussion meant to chart the path forward through the haze and uncertainty confronting that confronts the industry today.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 
— INTRODUCED BY—
Paul E. DuVoisin
Vice President,
Commercial,
Halifax Port Authority

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Dr. Melinda Crane
Chief Correspondent,
Deutsche Welle TV,
USA and Germany

  

— PANELISTS —
Rob Kusiciel
Vice President,
Logistics & Transportation,
Honeywell

 

Otto Schacht
Executive Vice President,
Global Sea Freight,
Kuehne + Nagel

 

Peter Levesque
Chief Executive Officer,
Modern Terminals Ltd., Hong Kong

 

Jeremy Nixon
CEO,
NYK Line

 


 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 
 
 

MAERSK'S NEW DIRECTION: WHAT IT MEANS FOR CUSTOMERS AND THE INDUSTRY

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

In one of many significant industry developments in 2016, Maersk Group on Sept. 22 announced plans to focus the group’s activities on freight transportation and likely divest itself of its oil and oil-related business within the next two years, with subsequent news suggesting the divestment could happen sooner. It elaborated on its plans at its Dec. 13 capital markets day. It said its transport-related companies, including Maersk Line, APM Terminals and Damco, would go forward as an “integrated transport and logistics company” with a mission to “enable and facilitate global supply chains and provide opportunities for our customers to trade globally.” Key to the strategy will be achieving synergies and investing in digital technology to improve profits and drive revenue growth while delivering a superior online customer experience akin to Fedex or UPS, an elusive goal for most container carriers. The move raises many questions, among them how synergies can be created between a forwarder such as Damco and a carrier such as Maersk, when Damco benefits from being carrier-neutral while Maersk benefits from being forwarder-neutral? How can APMT, which in recent years developed as a third-party terminal operator, become more aligned with Maersk without losing its ability to generate third party business? In this session featuring Maersk Chief Commerical Officer Vincent Clerc and other speakers, we will discuss what this move means for Maersk, its customers and the broader industry.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Virgil Ferreira
Vice President,
Business Development,
Catapult

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Dr. Melinda Crane
Chief Correspondent,
Deutsche Welle TV,
USA and Germany

 

— PANELISTS —
Vincent Clerc
Chief Commercial Officer,
Maersk Line

 

Lars Jensen
CEO and Founder,
SeaIntelligence Consulting
and author of 2014 book
"Culture Shock in Maersk Line."

 

Annelies Vermeulen
Vice President,
European Transportation Equity Research,
Morgan Stanley

 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 
 
 

IS THE FUTURE OF PRICING PUBLIC OR PRIVATE?
A TPM DEBATE

LOCATION: 102, 1st Floor

Will the future of containerized freight pricing be public or private? In other words, will the future purchase of slot capacity be dominated by the traditional practice of private, non-visible transactions among carriers, forwarders and beneficial cargo owners, as has been the case from the beginnings of containerization in the late 1950s? Or will pricing come to be dominated by public exchanges, where transparent Expedia-like services for quoting and booking become the medium for transactions? Two leading technology companies that represent these fundamentally divergent visions will debate where the industry is headed in the critical area of pricing. In 2016 Freightos, building on its freight rate management platform, launched “the world’s first online marketplace for international freight,” providing instant comparison, booking, and management of freight services from multiple logistics providers. Users can compare prices much the same way that airline customers compare flights. Freightos represents the “public” vision. CargoSphere, founded in 1999, operates “the industry’s first cloud-based, confidential global rate solution.” It is a rate platform for carriers, forwarder and BCOs. According to CargoSphere, it strengthens collaboration and relationships through its on-demand rate management and distribution platform. Its solution is premised on a continuation of the private system that dominates the industry today. CargoSphere represents the “private” vision. Where is the industry headed? The two sides will debate the future in what will surely be a highlight of the 2017 TPM.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Robert LaMura
Manager,
Maritime Industry Relations,
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Alan Murphy
CEO and Partner,
SeaIntel Maritime Analysis

 

— PANELISTS —
Neil Barni
Founder, President,
Cargosphere

 

Zvi Schreiber
CEO,
Freightos


 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 
 
 

INTERMODAL I:
WHEN WILL THE MARKET TURN?
AN ANALYSIS OF THE TRENDS AND OUTLOOK

LOCATION: 103, 1st Floor

Compared to sagging carload volume, the Class 1 railroads appear to be chugging along when it comes to international intermodal volume. But changes are lurking. Growth in the shipment of ocean containers by rail has floundered as more goods are transloaded into domestic containers at the largest US intermodal gateway, Los Angeles-Along Beach. Furthermore, some cargo has shifted from the West Coast to East and Gulf Coast ports, and those shipments don’t require a rail move. The ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are spending billions of dollars to expand on-dock railyards and staging areas in the harbor area, and the ports are working with the Class 1s, importers and exporters to study the economic feasibility of establishing shuttle trains from the harbor to intermodal staging yards in the Inland Empire. The need for near- and off-dock yards to build unit trains is more pressing now because the large ocean carrier vessel-sharing alliances are scattering containers across 13 marine terminals, making it more difficult for the railroads to build full unit trains on dock. East Coast ports, meanwhile, face their own challenges in expanding intermodal business because of tunnel-clearance issues and land-strapped ports that make it difficult to expand on and near-dock intermodal rail transfer facilities. These developments are occurring as pressure mounts on both coasts to mitigate port-area congestion by shifting more cargo from truck to rail.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Hans Bean
Vice President,
Trade Development,
North Carolina Ports

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Lawrence J. Gross
Partner and Senior Consultant,
FTR Associates, and President,
Gross Transportation Consulting

 

Steve Rand
Executive Vice President of Sales,
Hub Group

 

Mark Simon
Assistant Vice President,
International Intermodal M&S,
Union Pacific Railroad


 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 
 
 

COOL CARGOES I:
WILL THE REEFER MARKET STAY HOT?

LOCATION: 104B, 1st Floor

While 2017’s TPM theme, “A New Day Dawns,” applies fittingly to the ocean carrier sector at large, the sun continues to shine brightly on the reefer shipping segment, which according to global shipping consultancy Drewry, “will reach a staggering 120 million tonnes—increasing by an average of 2.5% per annum,” by 2020. The westbound U.S.-Asia trade lane leads in terms of reefer container volume, while vegetables, meat and poultry, fish and seafood, bananas, and deciduous fruit comprise three-quarters of all global containerized reefer cargo, adds Drewry. At the same time, temperature-controlled commodities such as pharmaceuticals, cut flowers and bulbs, confectionary, wine, and health and beauty products are also helping expand overall containerized reefer shipments, opening up new revenue streams for ocean carriers, and shipping options for BCOs. Join our panelists as they explore trends and issues important to importers/exporters and service providers, including a look at how changing demographics and consumer trends are impacting the global reefer market.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Jamie Overley
CEO,
East Coast Warehouse

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Lara Sowinski
Editorial Director,
Food Logistics and Supply & Demand Chain Executive

 

— PANELISTS —
Philip Damas
Director,
Drewry Supply Chain Advisors

 

Jim Blaeser
Vice President,
AlixPartners


 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 
 
 

WORKSHOP I: AN HOUR WITH TAN HUA JOO OF ALPHALINER

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Tan Hua Joo is widely regarded as the leading analyst covering container shipping globally. He is the founder and editor of the Alphaliner Weekly and Monthly reports. He has over twenty years of experience in the container shipping industry and has held senior positions in leading container shipping, container leasing and shipowning companies. Among his roles, he served as director of strategic planning for NOL, managing director of APL Vietnam and vice president for the equipment lessor Seacastle. He graduated with a BA in Politics, Philosophy and Economics from Oxford University and holds an MBA from Stanford University. He is regularly invited to speak at liner industry events to provide his perspective on current trends and developments. In this session he will expand upon his analysis of the current container shipping environment and take questions.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Juan Arriola
VP of Supply Chain Solutions,
National Retail Systems, Inc.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— SPEAKER —
Tan Hua Joo
Executive Consultant,
Alphaliner



 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 
 
 

BILLING AND INVOICING:
PROBLEMS AND SOLUTIONS

LOCATION: 102, 1st Floor

Beneficial cargo owners and non-vessel-operating common carriers on a daily basis experience on an enormous inconsistency in ocean freight invoicing and dispute management. Although some carriers are better than others, improper billing by the industry as a whole is a chronic headache for shippers, collectively costing them billions of dollars in overcharges and dedicated staff resources. That different teams within BCO organizations — logistics and back-office staffs — that often must interact to get issues resolved only compounds the problem. Many freight overcharges never go identified, and BCOs lose an estimated 1 percent of their ocean freight spend to overcharged billing. Why are these problems continuing? Is it just a symptom of low freight rates and carriers’ consequent inability to invest in quality customer service? Do carriers benefit financially from shippers paying more than they should and thus ignore the issue? Do shippers use disputed billings to delay paying carrier bills — that is, only agreeing to pay once billing problems are resolved? What are some particularly egregious examples of billing nightmares, what lessons can be learned and what can BCOs do tactically and in the short term to make the process more efficient? Can freight audit systems, a legacy of U.S. domestic trucking, play a role in helping BCOs cut costs and improve efficiency? This session will probe this issue in depth.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

— INTRODUCED BY—
Mike Erickson
CEO,
AFMS

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Steve Ferreira
Founder,
Ocean Audit

 
— PANELISTS —
Jack Conaghan
Director,
International Logistics & Small Parcel,
Guitar Center Inc.

 

John Wierzbicki
Vice President,
Sea Freight, Americas,
Hellmann Worldwide Logistics

 

Jason Lloyd
Director,
Freight Trade,
Interra International

 

Anil Vitarana
President,
Cranford Consulting Inc.
and former President,
United Arab Agencies Inc.

 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 
 
 

INTERMODAL II: USING TECHNOLOGY TO IMPROVE TRUCK TURN TIMES AT MARINE TERMINALS

LOCATION: 103, 1st Floor

West Coast ports are using mobile phone apps and GPS technology to obtain real-time information on gate queues and bottlenecks within container terminals, and drayage operators are reaping the benefits. Average truck visit times in Los Angeles-Long Beach is down to 87 minutes from 110 minutes or longer in 2015, according to the Harbor Trucking Association. Mobile phone apps are helping drivers in Oakland to navigate bottlenecks at marine terminals. The technology in use at Northern California has been adopted as well at the Northwest Seaport Alliance of Seattle and Tacoma. Drayage company dispatchers get real-time visibility into truck queues outside the gates, taking delivery of containers, conditions at the chassis pit and how long it takes to pass complete roadability inspections. The technology providers — Leidos in Oakland and Seattle-Tacoma, and InfoMagnus in Los Angeles-Long Beach — say beneficial cargo owners and terminal operators also are using these technologies to pinpoint problem areas and take corrective actions.Reducing truck visit times at the marine terminals help drayage companies to reduce overall operating costs in an increasingly high-cost environment. For example, import drayage rates from Los Angeles-Long Beach to such inland points as Anaheim, Carson and San Bernardino have more than doubled over the past three years to anywhere from $500 to $1,000 per trip. This session will analyze the latest service and technology solutions in play as terminal operators look to improve efficiency into and out of their gates.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Jason Hilsenbeck
President,
LoadMatch & Drayage.com

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Weston LaBar
Executive Director,
Harbor Trucking Association

 

Mitch J. Bernet
CEO,
Atadex

 

Caryn Blanc
Managing Partner,
The Triangle Group

 

Allen Thomas
Chief Strategy Officer,
Advent Intermodal Solutions

 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 
 
 

COOL CARGOES II:
SHIPPER-CARRIER PERSPECTIVES —
ACHIEVING TOTAL COLD CHAIN INTEGRITY THROUGH COLLABORATION, INNOVATION, AND RISK MANAGEMENT

LOCATION: 104B, 1st Floor

Despite depressed shipping rates for containerized cargoes, beneficial cargo owners of perishable, temperature-sensitive commodities pay a premium to transport their goods with the goal of optimizing freshness, maximizing shelf life, assuring product safety and security, and meeting consumers' growing demands for a greater variety of fresh foods, both in developed and emerging markets. Opportunities abound for reefer BCOs — but so do obstacles, including supply chain disruptions that jeopardize cold chain integrity. The 2014-15 US West Coast port slowdown hit reefer shippers disproportionately hard and resonates still. Although shippers of dry cargoes were able to divert containers to alternative gateways in many cases, most containerized reefer cargoes, especially food-related, spoiled at the ports, racking up huge losses for growers and shippers and damaging relationships with overseas buyers that could take years to mend. This panel of reefer shippers and carriers will engage in a candid, sometimes controversial, roundtable discussion that will explore best practices and insights about achieving cold chain integrity through collaboration; examine innovative software and technologies that are delivering real-time tracking, monitoring and intervention capabilities, along with improved atmospheric conditions inside the reefer container; address strategies and tactics for dealing with supply chain disruptions and how to mitigate risks; and dive into the challenges and opportunities in the coming year.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Lara Sowinski
Editorial Director,
Food Logistics and Supply & Demand Chain Executive

 

— PANELISTS —
Timothy O'Connell
Head of NAM Refrigerated Sales,
Maersk Line

 

Girish Nair
Director,
Multimodal Innovation,
Canadian National Railway

 

Trevor Sears
Director,
Sales & Marketing,
Maple Leaf Foods

 

Rick Margaritov
Founder and Managing Director,
The Drinkery


 
5:30 — 7:30 PM
 
 
 

WELCOME RECEPTION

LOCATION: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

 
 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.