February 26 - March 01, 2017
Long Beach, CA

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

All sessions will take place in the Long Beach Convention Center*  

 

 
7:00 AM — 6:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
8:30 — 8:45 AM
 

WELCOMING REMARKS AND LOG-NET E-COMMERCE EXCELLENCE AWARD

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

— INTRODUCED BY —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 
— AWARD PRESENTED BY —
John Motley
CEO and Founder,
Log-Net


 
8:45 — 9:45 AM
 

ONE-ON-ONE:
A CONVERSATION WITH CMA CGM'S RODOLPHE SAADE

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Rodolphe Saade is Chief Excutive Officer of CMA CGM, the world's third-largest container line, having assumed that role on Feb. 8 when his father, company founder Jacques Saade turned 80. He joined CMA CGM Group in 1994, working in New York and Hong Kong before moving to the head office in Marseilles, France. From 1997 to 2000 he headed different services for the company before taking responsibility for the trans-Atlantic and trans-Pacific trades. In 2004 he was named executive officer in charge of developing regular services on the north-south axis. In 2006, he directed Delmas Shipping's expansion into Africa and the Indian Ocean, turning the subsidiary into an efficient and profitable operator. In 2008, when a cruise yacht owned by Le Ponant, a CMA CGM subsidiary at that time, was hijacked, he was the one who led negotiations with the pirates, which ended with their release. After being appointed vice chairman and member of CMA CGM's board in 2010, he managed the group's financial restructuring More recently, he conducted the preconditional voluntary general cash offer for NOL, the parent of APL, and became president of the board in June 2016, shortly after CMA CGM acquired a majority of the NOL shares following the all-cash tender offer. On behalf of CMA CGM, he led the talks leading to the signing of the Ocean Alliance, in April 2016, including Cosco, Evergreen, and OOCL In this one-on-one discussion, we'll hear from one of the industry's key leaders assessing the impact of a tumultous 2016.

 
— SPONSORED BY —


— INTRODUCED BY —
Sean Mahoney
Director of Marketing,
Philadelphia Regional Port Authority

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
Rodolphe Saade
CEO,
CMA CGM
 

 
9:45 — 10:30 AM
 
 
 

WHAT'S ATTRACTING SILICON VALLEY TO FREIGHT?

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Never before has there been greater interest by technology investors in freight transportation. Dozens of startups have sprung up over the last three years, attracting more than $100 million in venture financing. Supply chain technology accelerators are being established and big names such as Uber and Amazon say they plan major forays into freight transportation. What is attracting all of this interest? What does it mean for incumbent players, and how will it transform the industry? Wesley Chan, a leading Silicon Valley investor and Google pioneer with a particular interest and experience in freight investments, will offer his unique perspective. He is a Managing Director at Felicis Ventures, and has a special in interest in logistics, having led Felicis’ investments in Flexport, Zipline, and a stealth transportation and trucking logistics company. He also understands logistics challenges and the need for reinvention through his experience in hardware investments such as Luma, Ring, and Fitbit. He has led investment rounds and holds board or observer seats in Canva, CultureAmp, HyperScience, and Dialpad. He was previously a general partner at Google Ventures, where he led investment rounds and held board or observer seats in Angelist, Crittericism, iPerian (acquired by Bristol Myers-Squibb), Cool Planet Energy Systems, and Switch Communications. As an early employee at Google, he founded and launched Google Analytics and Google Voice, which reach tens of millions of users worldwide. Wesley is a recipient of the Google’s Founders Award, the company’s most prestigious recognition, for leading the development of Google’s early client efforts, which led to the development of Google Chrome. Wesley is an inventor with 15 US patents, many from his work on building Google’s early advertising products. He also has held technical positions both at HP Labs and Microsoft. He holds both Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering from MIT where he completed his graduate research at the Media Laboratory. He was selected as a “Top 35 Under 35” innovator by Technology Review magazine in 2010. He has been featured in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, and his story as an early product innovator at Google is covered by Steven Levy’s Google Book, “In The Plex.”

 

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Ryan Petersen
CEO,
Flexport

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
Wesley Chan
Managing Director,
Felicis Ventures


 
10:30 — 11:00 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 
 
 

THE PORT OF NEW YORK-NEW JERSEY:
WITH VESSEL ACCESS SECURED,
WHAT'S HAPPENING ON THE LAND SIDE?

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

By the end of 2017 the Port of New York and New Jersey — navigationally speaking — will be ready for 18,000-TEU ships, with the likelihood that 15,000- to 16,000-TEU vessels will begin arriving perhaps as early as 2017. A decade-long 50-foot deepening was completed in September 2016, and the Bayonne Bridge elevation is scheduled to be done by the end of 2017, creating true mega-ship access at the second-largest container gateway in the Western hemisphere. But these big ships will bring more cargo and cargo surges, prompting the port in recent years to focus on ensuring landside container flow through its six marine terminals. The surges are only growing: Today 55 to 60 percent of the total East Coast discharge of a typical ship in Asia service occurs at New York-New Jersey. This is up from 30 percent a decade ago, and officials believe the port could see up to 75 percent of a ship’s East Coast discharges in coming years. To manage those flows, the port has been expanding on-dock rail, moving toward implementing trucker appointment systems, a chassis pool and extended terminal hours in an effort to improve fluidity of cargo movements. The port faces increasing competition from other regional ports that also have deepened harbors and upgraded other infrastructure to attract the big ships. This session will address these and other pressing issues shippers face when using the New York-New Jersey port.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Hugh Morley
Senior Editor,
Northeast and Mexico,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Molly Campbell
Director,
Port Department,
Port Authority of NY & NJ

 

John J. Nardi
President,
New York Shipping Association

 

Frank Capo
Senior Vice President,
Commercial,
Maher Terminals LLC

 

Keith E. Lovetro
President & CEO,
TRAC Intermodal

 

Robert Fredman
Director, Global Logistics,
Big Lots Stores, Inc.

 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 
 
 

EXPORTS I: THE RESINS BATTLEGROUND

LOCATION: 102, 1st Floor

With ExxonMobil, Chevron Phillips 66, Dow Chemical and other large multinational companies pumping billions of dollars into massive new petrochemical plants, Gulf ports are racing to prepare for the huge amount of new containerized trade coming their way in the form of resins and other plastics products. In Texas alone, new petrochemical plants could generate more than 500,000 TEUs a year by 2020 — equivalent to a quarter of Houston’s total containerized trade in 2015. But how will Houston and other Gulf ports handle this surge? Will other carriers follow Maersk and MSC with services through the Gulf to capitalize on these new containerized cargoes? What infrastructure improvements must occur and what projects do ports have underway? Meanwhile, Savannah, Charleston, Los Angeles-Long Beach and other ports also have designs on attracting resin shipments. This session will analyze the huge opportunities — and challenges — the petrochemical boom presents for ports on all three coasts, and analyze what options, and in what measures, make the most sense for petrochemical exporters.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Donovan Murray
General Manager,
Intermodal / Trade Development,
Maryland Port Authority

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk/Project Cargo and US Gulf Coast,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port of Houston Authority

 

Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

 

Seana Fairchild
Senior Director,
International Intermodal Sales,
Union Pacific Railroad

 

Christian Tangen Pedersen
Vice President,
North America Trade & Marketing,
Maersk Line

 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 

INTERMODAL III:
HOW CAN PORTS OPTIMIZE CHASSIS EFFICIENCY, AND WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR SHIPPERS?

Location: 103, 1st Floor

It’s been more than five years since most ocean carriers sold their chassis fleets to intermodal equipment providers, but the new regime hasn’ worked to the advantage of shippers and truckers in some port and inland locations. This is especially true in the largest port complexes, Los Angeles-Long Beach and New York-New Jersey. Although BCOs and truckers say chassis availability has improved noticeably since the grey chassis “pool of pools” was established in Southern California in March 2015, they still must contend with chassis shortages, rising lease rates, and longshore labor roadability inspections. Part of the problem is that ocean carriers haven’t completely exited the chassis business. Carriers still provide chassis to customers for so-called store-door moves that include delivery of the container and use of the chassis. Even truckers that own chassis must use equipment designated by the ocean carriers, leading to delays for truckers in securing equipment. Most ocean carriers yield to competitive pressures to grant their preferred customers extensive free time for chassis usage, which diminishes overall availability of equipment in the harbor area. Marine terminal operators attempt to keep adequate chassis on hand to satisfy their customers’ needs, but are they hoarding chassis and contributing to equipment shortages? New York-New Jersey, which has yet to fulfill its commitment to establish a market-based chassis pool, has its own challenges, including longshore jurisdiction claims for maintenance and repair. This session will examine how ports, ocean carriers, truckers, BCOs, equipment providers, and longshore labor can work together to build a more efficient chassis regime. 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
William J. Shea
Chief Executive Officer,
Direct Chassislink Inc.

 

Fred Johring
President,
Golden State Express,
and Chairman,
Harbor Trucking Association

 

Steve Schulein
Vice President,
Drayage and Industry Relations,
National Retail Transportation Inc.

 


 
11:00 AM — 12:00 PM
 

COOL CARGOES III:
STAYING AHEAD OF RISKS RELATED TO REGULATORY COMPLIANCE, SAFETY AND SECURITY

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

Fresh food, pharmaceuticals and biologics, certain chemicals, and a host of other temperature-controlled cargoes are subject to a wide range of rules and regulations — a complex landscape that is continually in flux, from the US Food and Drug Administration's Food Safety Modernization Act and Europe's Good Manufacturing and Good Distribution Practice programs to dangerous goods transportation rules for certain chemicals and compounds. Maintaining compliance with these and other regulations associated with refrigerated shipments can be daunting and costly. Understanding current regulations and responding effectively with the right processes and procedures to assure compliance is paramount. Meanwhile, reefer cargo safety and security is a shared concern for BCOs, ocean carriers and other logistics partners. Temperature excursions and mishandling of reefer cargoes compromise product viability, minimize shelf life and exacerbate food waste. Furthermore, cargo theft and tampering remains a serious threat to food and pharmaceutical shippers, in particular, ultimately putting the public's health and welfare at risk. As a BCO, what are your responsibilities with regards to regulations? How can BCOs protect their cargoes from theft? What resources are available to BCOs?

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

— INTRODUCED BY —
Corey Rhodes
Vice President,
Industry Solutions,
Amber Road

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Lara Sowinski
Editorial Director,
Food Logistics and Supply & Demand Chain Executive

 

— PANELISTS —
Philippa Williams
Supply Chain Risk Advisor,
Latin America,
BSI Group,
Supply Chain Services and Solutions

 

Don Durm
Vice President,
Customer Solutions,
PLM Trailer Leasing


 
12:00 — 1:15 PM
 
 
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

LOCATION: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor


 
1:15 — 2:15 PM
 
 
 

LEARNING FROM HANJIN

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

When shippers awoke last Aug. 31, they faced a new reality: Hanjin Shipping, the world’s seventh-largest ocean carrier by deployed capacity with more than 600,000 TEUs on the water, had collapsed — its primary creditor no longer willing to support its $5 billion debt load. The fallout was devastating. Even with Hanjin controlling just 7 percent of trans-Pacific capacity, its unraveling trapped cargo — some of it for months — at the worst possible time: the peak shipping season when holiday goods move from Asia to US store shelves. In the South Korean carrier’s wake, shippers are left with critical and important questions, because, although their fears of another carrier collapse in the near term have receded, the threat remains very real. In an increasingly complex container shipping market, in which strong carriers are partnering with weak, in which shippers can book with one carrier and unknowingly have their goods move on another, how can beneficial cargo owners protect themselves? What are the real warning signs that a carrier collapse might be imminent? How can shippers scrutinize carriers’ health, when several are private and release no financial information? When a carrier goes under, where do shippers turn for information about the status of their cargo, who is liable, and what to expect in terms of disruption? This session will discuss the key takeaways from the Hanjin debacle and present best practices for BCOs in scrutinizing their transportation providers to minimize their risk in the event of another carrier collapse, and arm them with the information they need if their cargo is stuck.

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor  

 

— INTRODUCED BY—
Fred Gilbert
VP of Strategy & Marketing,
Performance Team

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Nicola Good
Executive Editor,
IHS Fairplay

 

— PANELISTS —
Karyn A. Booth
Partner & Transportation Practice Group Leader,
Thompson Hine

 

Howard Finkel
Executive Vice President,
COSCO Shipping

 

David J. Arsenault
President,
Logistics Transformation Solutions,
and former President,
Hyundai Merchant Marine America

 

Commissioner William P. Doyle
Federal Maritime Commission

 
1:15 — 2:15 PM
 
 
 

INDUSTRIAL REAL ESTATE:
A COMPARATIVE PRICING ANALYSIS OF THE NORTH AMERICAN MARKET

LOCATION: 102, 1st Floor

BCOs make their routing decisions and choice of gateways based largely on the delivered cost of their freight. The ocean freight rate, port fees, intermodal rail rates, time-to-market and inventory carrying costs are the key determinants in calculating the delivered cost of freight. University of California, Berkeley, professor of industrial engineering and operations research, has calculated the delivered cost of low, medium and high-value freight freight from Asia through 21 US gateways to major inland and coastal destinations. Through 2016’s third quarter, there was no doubt where the hot spots were: In the prime locations near major seaports and inland distribution hubs. Among the tightest large industrial markets were Los Angeles (1 percent vacancy rate), Detroit (2.7 percent), Central New Jersey (3.3 percent), Chicago (3.8 percent, and California’s Inland Empire (4.3 percent), according to CBRE’s Third Quarter Industrial Real Estate report. That shortage of capacity, and the high pricing it demands, is forcing BCOs to rethink distribution strategies as they look for the right balance between costs related to inland vs. coastal locations. Logistics experts and industrial real estate professionals will join Leachman in discussing the importance of freight rates, cargo value, intermodal rail rates, trucking rates, labor and land costs, interest rates, inventory-carrying costs in determining routing decisions and choice of gateways. Because each BCO is unique in requirements for transit-time, access to consuming markets and merchandise-handling requirements, building the right facility in the right location requires a tailored solution for every BCO. The equation becomes even more complex when e-commerce fulfillment is the end game.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Robert Leachman
Professor of Industrial Engineering
and Operations Research,
University of California, Berkeley

 

Dr. Walter Kemmsies
Managing Director, Economist,
and Chief Strategist,
JLL Ports Airports and
Global Infrastructure

 

William F. Rooney
Vice President Trade Management,
North America,
Kuehne + Nagel Inc.

 
1:15 — 2:15 PM
 
 
 

WORKSHOP II:
LINER SHIPPING IN 2025:
WHAT WILL IT TAKE TO SURVIVE AND THRIVE?

LOCATION: 103, 1st Floor

"Liner Shipping 2025" is the new book by SeaIntel founder Lars Jensen and author of the 2014 book "Culture Shock in Maersk Line." Jensen spent six years heading market intelligence for Maersk and three years focused on e-commerce innovation for A.P. Moller-Maersk. He will discuss his new book in this TPM workshop and do a book signing afterwards. "Overall we are facing a transition where the industry will no longer be a tradecraft but will shift into a data and process driven era," he says. "The underlying core which is incredibly important for all market stakeholders to understand is that this requires a transformation of business models, processes, relationships, skillsets and — most importantly — industry culture. Current key topics such as digitization, carrier discipline, big data, overcapacity etc. are the tools and catalysts for this change, but it is the underlying fundamental transformation of culture and business models that will determine the fate of the existing industry players. In very simple terms, only industry players that make this transformation have a chance of seeing the new day dawning.”

 
— WORKSHOP LEADER —
Lars Jensen
CEO and Founder,
SeaIntelligence Consulting
and author of 2014 book
"Culture Shock in Maersk Line."

 
1:15 — 2:15 PM
 
 
 

TECHNOLOGY I: HOW START-UPS ARE MAKING INROADS INTO TRANSPORTATION

LOCATION: 104B, 1st Floor

Hundreds of technology startups have jumped into freight transportation over the past few years. Despite lofty ambitions to disrupt, disintermediate and revolutionize an industry rife with inefficiencies and legacy practices, few will actually succeed. On the one hand, a start-up will sidestep many legacy anachronisms that plague traditional transportation entities. And, recognizing where those anachronisms lie enables start-ups to bring fresh approaches to age-old challenges and leverage technology in innovative and agile ways. On the other hand, start-ups face practical realities such as the size and scale needed to achieve pricing advantages and access to assets. This session will place a few well-known transportation start-ups in the spotlight, explore the benefits they've been able to exploit, and the challenges they're confronting. It also will explore how traditional businesses can think and act more like start-ups, and how concerned they need to be about them.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY—
Jon Monroe
Chief Information Officer,
De Well Container Shipping Corp.

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Mike Simon
Principal Consultant,
DefinedLogic

 

— PANELISTS —
Ryan Petersen
CEO,
Flexport

 

Stefan Seltz-Axmacher
CEO,
Starsky Robotics


 
2:15 — 3:15 PM
 
 
 

BOOK SIGNING:
LARS JENSEN, CEO AND FOUNDER SEAINTELLIGENCE CONSULTING

LOCATION: 103 Foyer

After giving a presentation based on his book, “Liner Shipping 2025” Lars Jensen, CEO and Founder, SeaIntelligence Consulting, will be signing copies of his book for TPM attendees.

 
Lars Jensen
CEO and Founder,
SeaIntelligence Consulting
and author of 2014 book
"Culture Shock in Maersk Line."

 
2:15 — 2:45 PM
 
 
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: 1st Floor

 
 

 
2:45 — 3:45 PM
 
 
 

WORKSHOP III:
WHY GETTING CONTAINERS THROUGH MAJOR US GATEWAYS IS ABOUT TO GET MORE PROBLEMATIC, AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

If 2016 was year when ocean carriers consummated unprecedented mergers and acquisitions, 2017 will be when they're implemented. From a flow perspective, that and the new alliance structure those deals have created, should raise red flags for shippers. With different carriers’ cargo moving on different carriers’ ships, those ships calling at new terminals, and chassis provision still a wildcard, a recipe for chaos is brewing that shippers must be aware. Veteran shipping executive Ron Widdows, the former CEO of NOL/APL and current chairman of the World Shipping Council, will lead a discussion of the dynamics shippers need to be prepared for as the consolidation and alliance restructuring of 2016 actually gets implemented. It could be a wild ride. To this point, Port of Los Angeles Executive Director Gene Seroka told BCOs and truckers in December were warning to expect “another wave of confusion” as carriers and terminal operators get used to their new partners and the spreading out of containers across the marine terminals.

 
— WORKSHOP LEADER —
Ronald D. Widdows
Executive Chairman,
American Intermodal Management; Chairman,
World Shipping Council;
Former CEO,
NOL/APL

 

— PANELISTS —
Gene Seroka
Executive Director,
Port of Los Angeles

 

Todd Zaninelli
Director,
International Transportation,
Lowe's

 

Thomas Lorenzo
International Transportation Manager,
Domtar Corp.

 

Jonathan Rosenthal
Managing Partner,
Saybrook Capital

 
2:45 — 3:45 PM
 
 
 

COMMUNICATING INTERNALLY:
BEST PRACTICES IN MANAGING INTERNAL STAKEHOLDERS FROM
THE C-SUITE TO MERCHANDISERS

LOCATION: 102, First Floor

A key aspect of the role of any logistics director is setting expectations effectively communicating internally. Low rates may not stay low and cargo might get disrupted by longshore labor or some other cause like blanked sailings or, say, a container carrier collapse. While freight rate gyrations or cargo disruption are dynamics external to the organization, internal expectations among key stakeholders such as CFOs, CEOs, merchandisers and other internal customers must be adequately managed or the logistics function can lose critical internal support. What are best practices for ensuring logistics directors effectively communicate to internal stakeholders, including those at the top of the management chain? How should they best communicate the intricacies of the logistics business in a nomenclature that doesn’t bog down in technical, industry terms, while preventing overreaction in times of disruption and financially related change?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Richard Markovich
Former Senior Supply Chain Executive,
Michaels Stores Inc. and Pier 1 Imports

 

Meg Osuch
Director of Transportation,
Claire's Stores

 

Jack Oney
CEO,
Oney Consulting,
and Former Purchases Group Manager,
Procter & Gamble

 
2:45 — 3:45 PM
 
 
 

TRANSPORTATION UNDER TRUMP: WHAT THE INCOMING ADMINISTRATION AND CONGRESS MEAN TO FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION

LOCATION: 103, 1st Floor

The incoming Trump administration is promising $1 trillion in infrastructure investment; a reset — or withdrawal from — trade deals, most notably NAFTA; and the repeal of regulation or at least a curb of new rules. That's a tall order and not just the tip of threat and opportunities to importers and exporters. Hidden behind the headlines are critical issues questions on the administration will steer port funding, the creation of port productivity metrics and deal with potential longshore labor disputes. Panelists will zero in on what the administration can do in the short-term, what challenges it faces (Hint: Funding), and, most importantly, what the real world impact will be on shippers and the transportation providers they rely on. In addition to the challenge of assembling a team to implement these goals, Trump faces strong corporate pressure to avoid a trade war or do anything too radical to hurt already fragile US consumer spending. The reworking of trade deals is onerous, and politicians generally support freight infrastructure spending until they have to figure out how to pay for it — typically a career-killing vote to raise fuel taxes. Trump’s foreign policy also will determine the direction of trade as sanctions on Iran, Russia, and Cuba are now in play.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Ashley Craig
Partner and Co-Chair,
International Trade Group,
Venable LLP

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Jonathan Gold
Vice President of Supply Chain and Customs Policy,
National Retail Federation

 

Paul H. Bea Jr.
Government Relations and Policy Advisor,
PHB Public Affairs

 

Steve Hughes
Vice President of Supplier Development,
Government Affairs and Logistics,
Centric Parts

 

Susan Kohn Ross
Partner and International Trade Counsel,
Mitchell Silberberg & Knupp LLP

 
2:45 — 3:45 PM
 
 
 

TECHNOLOGY II:
BLOCKCHAIN FOR FREIGHT— HYPE OR A COMING REVOLUTION?

LOCATION: 104B, First Floor

Blockchain, or distributed ledger technology, got its start enabling bitcoin transactions but is rapidly gaining interest in dozens of industries as a secure and cost-effective means to facilitate transactions. Blockchain aims to share a digital ledger across a network of computers without need for a central authority such as a bank. Under the concept, no single party can tamper with the records because transparency keeps all participants honest. Today, more than 40 large financial institutions and a growing number of companies across several industries, including goods movement, are experimenting with blockchain technology as a secure and transparent means to digitally track ownership of assets, according to The Wall Street Journal. The first live attempts to apply blockchain to bills of lading occurred in 2016, with a handful of forwarders and technology companies participating. Some, however, believe blockchain-based bills of lading would not come into widespread use unless it is given sufficient support from the legal infrastructure. This panel will discuss the issue in-depth and examine whether it has a viable future in freight transportation.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor 

— INTRODUCED BY —
Monica Truelsch
Director of Transportation Solutions,
GT Nexus

 

— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
Daniel James
Director of Commodities,
Financial Markets,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELIST —
Alexander Goulandris
CEO,
essDocs

 

Brigid McDermott
Vice President,
Blockchain Business Development,
IBM

 

Dave Albert
Chief Operating Officer,
Libra

 
2:45 — 3:45 PM
 
 
 

SHIPPER ROUNDTABLE

LOCATION: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

An invitation-only, off-the-record discussion of current ocean transportation issues as they affect chemicals shippers.

 
— ROUNDTABLE LEADER —
Bjorn Klippel
CEO,
TIM Consult

 
3:45 — 4:45 PM
 
 
 

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO ACHIEVE SUCCESSFUL COOPERATION BETWEEN SHIPPER AND CARRIER?

LOCATION: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

With the industry having gone through unprecedented consolidation in 2016 - with the potential for more to come - is now an opportunity to redefine or in many cases strengthen the relationship between shippers and forwarders on one hand and carriers on the other? Some believe so. Shippers and forwarders (acting on behalf of their own customers) are challenged by extended transit times due to slow steaming, longer port handling times due to larger vessels and ongoing customer service issues. Carriers experience significant no-shows, lax contract adherence and other issues. Amid these challenges, some relationships work very well, where trust and operational coordination combine to create a win-win scenario. All sides want to continue improving, and there is active discussion about how this can happen. For example, can there be greater use of incentives for shippers to reduce no-shows, improving carriers’ operating efficiency? Can there be firmer commitments on space? Is now the time to discuss premium products? This session will get into these issues in-depth.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Rolf Habben Jansen
CEO,
Hapag-Lloyd
 

 

Frank Hercksen
Regional CEO for the Americas,
Panalpina

 

Glenn E. Berger
Vice President,
Global Transportation,
Restoration Hardware

 

Michelle Livingstone
Vice President,
Transportation,
The Home Depot

 

Jochen Gutschmidt
Head of Global Logistics Procurement,
Nestlé

 
3:45 — 4:45 PM
 
 
 

THE HUMAN SIDE OF TODAY'S VOLATILE MARKET: AN EXAMINATION OF THE SHIPPING JOBS MARKET

LOCATION: 102, First Floor

With ocean carriers having lost billions of dollars in collective losses in six straight years, volatility has never been higher in the 60-year history of container shipping. With those losses forcing carriers to merge, restructure alliances, streamline networks or declare bankruptcy, uncertainty among employees, managers and hiring executives has seldom been higher. Carriers on the ocean and land have announced significant layoffs over the past two years, and more could be on the way, and Hanjin’s collapse left some 5,000 employees out of work. With that in mind, how does the jobs market look? With impending mergers and realignment of carrier alliances, should senior management be looking to fill critical positions? With so much uncertainty, what challenges do companies face in recruiting talent? What opportunities exist for employees who stay, and where will those who have been downsized go? This session will analyze the human element of the turmoil impacting today’s supply chain while taking a deep dive into the supply chain jobs market.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Susan Shey Dvonch
Managing Partner,
Shey-Harding Associates

 

— PANELISTS —
James Armstrong
Executive Director,
Transportation & Warehouse,
America Chung Nam Inc.

 

David Arsenault
President,
Logistics Transformation Solutions,
and former President,
Hyundai Merchant Marine America

 

Janee Ortiz
Human Resources Business Partner,
APM Terminals

 

Louis F. Gutierrez
Managing Director,
Human Resources and Team Development,
Port of Long Beach

 
3:45 — 4:45 PM
 
 
 

TECHNOLOGY III:
IF TRUE VISIBILITY WERE REAL,
WHAT WOULD IT LOOK LIKE?

LOCATION: 104B, First Floor

What if your organization knew the whereabouts of your cargo at any time? The reality is that even in 2017 and despite huge advances in technology, most organizations don’t know what ship their cargo is on, when it docked, when containers are cleared for pickup or when the truck will arrive at the warehouse — much less where their cargo is moment to moment. The reality is that most supply chains still operate in the dark when it comes to ocean container movements. But if such levels of visibility could be achieved, what would the world look like? What kinds of decisions could it drive and what value would it unlock? Some believe that when fully available and leveraged, true visibility would save millions of dollars in detention and demurrage, late and expedited fees, theft and inventory costs, and improved customer service. For shippers, when fully available and leveraged, true visibility would save millions of dollars in detention and demurrage, late and expedited fees, theft and inventory costs, and improved customer service. For carriers, true visibility would result in a reduction in the number of forfeited loads, more miles and a reduction in overall traffic congestion. And for the planet, improved efficiency through true visibility adds up a reduction in carbon emissions and less pollution. In other words, the potential is staggering. But what is the state of the art of “real” real – time visibility today and actually using available technology for taking a detailed, and cross-lane, cross-mode, and cross-carrier look at what is occurring in your supply chain? How can humans in the supply chain take the blinders off and let machines provide the visibility? This session will explore the “art of what’s possible” when we’re finally equipped with reliable data, Internet of Things and sensors, machine learning and many other new and emerging technologies.

 
— SESSION CHAIR & PRESENTER —
Jack Oney
CEO,
Oney Consulting,
and Former Purchases Group Manager,
Procter & Gamble

 

— PANELISTS —
Eric Brandt
Vice President,
Head of Sales-North District,
Panalpina

 

Adam Compain
CEO,
ClearMetal

 

Andy Souders
Chief Technology Officer and
Senior Vice President of Engineering,
All Traffic Solutions

 

Jim Hayden
Executive Vice President,
Products,
Savi Technology


 
4:45 — 5:30 PM
 
 
 

SHIPPER DEBRIEF

LOCATION: 103, First Floor

A special, off-the-record discussion and review of the issues dominating today's containerized ocean shipping industry. By Reservation Only for Shippers.

 
— SESSION LEADERS —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
IHS Markit


 
5:00 — 7:00 PM
 
 
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

LOCATION: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Pool Deck

 
 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:

All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.