October 10 - 12, 2017
Shenzhen, China

 

 

7:30 am – 6:30 pm

REGISTRATION

LOCATION: Hotel Lobby

 

SPONSORED BY:

Prince Rupert

 


 

7:30 - 8:30 am

Welcome Coffee & Tea

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 

 


 

8:30 - 9:00 am

WELCOMING REMARKS

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I

 

Peter Tirschwell SENIOR DIRECTOR CONTENT, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

Greg Knowler Asia Editor, IHS Maritime & Trade

— GUEST SPEAKER — Yang Hong Member of Standing Committee of CPC Shenzhen Municipality

 


 

9:00 - 9:45 AM

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I ZIM Integrated Shipping is the world's 19th-largest ocean carrier, operating a fleet totaling more than 365,000 TEUs, according to research analyst Alphaliner. Operating in the main east-west trade lanes, ZIM returned to profit in the first quarter of 2015 after a difficult 2014 by focusing on new routes in more profitable areas. What makes the line different from other large carriers is that it's the only major container carrier not involved in one of the big east-west shipping alliances. With the container shipping industry battling challenges created by these huge vessel-sharing tie-ups, ZIM CEO Rafi Danieli will give an independent carrier’s view of the state of the business, bringing his unique perspective to an industry burdened by poor profitability, surplus capacity and rising complexity.

 

— INTRODUCED BY — Peter Tirschwell SENIOR DIRECTOR CONTENT, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— FEATURED SPEAKER — Rafi Danieli President & CEO, ZIM Integrated Shipping Services Ltd.

 


 

9:45 - 10:45 AM

ASIA SHIPPING OUTLOOK — MARKET FUNDAMENTALS

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I Top container shipping analysts will give their outlook and expectations of the Asia-Europe, trans-Pacific and North-South (Africa, South America) trades. With China in slowdown mode and surplus capacity in Asia-Europe cascading into the other trades, how will the supply-demand picture look into 2016? Should the market reduce its dependence on contract business given it’s ineffectiveness in ensuring a stable return?

 

SPONSORED BY:

Yantian

— INTRODUCED BY — Dr. Kenneth Wong Commercial Director, South China, HPH

— SESSION CHAIR — Peter Tirschwell SENIOR DIRECTOR CONTENT, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS — Brian Nemeth Director/Hong Kong, AlixPartners

Mario O. Moreno Senior Economist, JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

10:45 - 11:15 AM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

SPONSORED BY:

UASC

 


 

11:15 AM - 12:00 PM

INTRA-ASIA SHIPPING: THE CHANGING DYNAMICS OF A SURGING MARKET

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I Following the market outlook, this presentation will focus on the Asian trades that, while growing, face a sustained struggle against overcapacity and weakening freight rates. While the intra-Asia trade is the world’s largest, it is firmly connected to the major east-west trades, and containerized volumes are driven primarily by China. But who are the major shippers on this trade, and how many containers do they export from China? Do some shippers generate so many containers that they can influence trade? Using extensive research into China Customs data, Michel Looten, Director of Maritime for Seabury Group, will provide valuable analysis down to the shipper-consignee level.

 

SPONSORED BY:

Shekou

— INTRODUCED BY — Celia Xiao Key Client Manager, Business Development Department, Shekou Container Terminals Ltd.

— SESSION CHAIR — Greg Knowler Asia Editor, IHS Maritime & Trade

— FEATURED SPEAKER — Michel Looten Director of Maritime, Seabury

 

 


 

12:00 - 12:45 PM

CHINA'S SLOWDOWN: WHAT DOES IT MEAN FOR SHIPPING?

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I China’s factory output slowed in early 2015, with weak demand from its major markets leading to falling exports. Volumes at most of the world’s major carriers declined in the first quarter compared to the same period last year, and indicators such as weak business done at the Canton Fair’s spring exhibition in April don’t point to a strengthening of export orders this year. Some experts believe China, facing massive and rising debt, is heading for a long period of stagnant growth, like Japan experienced in the 1980s and 1990s. What implications will China’s slowing economy have on containerized trade? Will it put the brakes on the domestic consumption Beijing is trying to stimulate, and who loses when domestic consumption slows? How are shippers adjusting to this new China order?

 

SPONSORED BY:

Konecranes

— INTRODUCED BY — Chris Brooks Executive Editor, The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events, IHS Maritime & Trade

— FEATURED SPEAKER — Paul Pang Vice President, IHS Chemical, China

 


 

12:45 - 1:45 PM

LUNCH

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom II & Barcelona

 

 

 


 

1:45 - 2:15 PM

MAKING SIZE COUNT — ECONOMICS OF THE MEGA-VESSEL

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I Ultra-large container vessels capable of carrying more than 18,000 TEUs dominate the Asia-Europe and Mediterranean trades. Because of their size, they can only operate on these routes and call only at Asia's major transshipment ports. We’ve all heard about the unit cost advantages in deploying larger ships, but what are the operational demands of running a string of these ships in an economically viable way? How many hundreds of feeder ships are required to serve an ultra-large vessel when it makes a hub port call and who manages that process? What are the ideal port turnaround times and are they achievable? What impact do low freight rates have on the breakeven load factors? A renowned analyst will examine these questions and more in this insightful examination of one of the industry's biggest issues.

 

— INTRODUCED BY — Peter Tirschwell SENIOR DIRECTOR CONTENT, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— FEATURED SPEAKER — Olaf Merk Administrator Ports and Shipping, International Transport Forum/Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development

 


 

2:15 - 3:30 PM

 

PORT CONGESTION: WHAT NEEDS TO BE DONE TO IMPROVE ASIA CARGO FLOWS?

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I Congestion arrived with a vengeance in 2014, with many ports around the world struggling to cope with surges in volumes. Even large and efficient Asia-Pacific hubs widely thought to be immune to port congestion, such as Hong Kong, Shanghai and Busan, reported delays. With manufacturing and assembly spread out across Asia, the intra-Asia trade is growing. Adding to the volumes are ultra-large container ships on the Asia-Europe trade that require a huge network of feeder vessels to fill them up. The 2014 bottlenecks raised serious questions about the ability of regional ports to handle rising volumes, upsetting schedule reliability and adding transportation costs. How long will this situation prevail, and what can Asian ports do to improve productivity? Is there enough incentive to invest in infrastructure, and what are the consequences for a port that can’t improve its productivity?

 

SPONSORED BY:

DaChan

— INTRODUCED BY — Jessica Qi General Manager-Customer Experience, DACHAN BAY

— SESSION CHAIR — Greg Knowler Asia Editor, IHS Maritime & Trade

— PANELISTS — Andy Lane Partner, CTI Consultancy

Robbert Jan van Trooijen Chief Executive, North Asia, Maersk Line

Roger Megann Group Director, Containers, Peel Ports

 


 

3:30 - 4:00 PM

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

SPONSORED BY:

Venable

 


 

4:00 - 5:00PM

SHIPPING ALLIANCES: HOW ARE THEY WORKING?

LOCATION: Espana Ballroom I Although they’ve been part of container shipping since its early days, shipping alliances have taken on new relevance. The groupings are solid and likely to around for the long term but remain the source of controversy, whether from regulators suspecting anticompetitive behavior, shippers trying to diversify their carrier base or ports that must handle surges in inter-terminal moves when alliance members call at multiple terminals within a port. Yet alliances such as the G6 allow six mid-tier carriers to compete against much larger carriers like Maersk Line -- the Group CEO of which suggested, in June, that smaller carriers like those in that alliance consider exiting the market due to lack of profitability. Understanding alliances’ current role is crucial in managing an effective container supply chain.

 

SPONSORED BY:

CargoSmart

— INTRODUCED BY — Fanny Lai Senior Manager, Business Development (Asia Pacific), CargoSmart

— SESSION CHAIR — Peter Tirschwell SENIOR DIRECTOR CONTENT, IHS MARITIME & TRADE

— PANELISTS — Jeremy Nixon CEO, NYK Line

Dr. Noel Hacegaba Chief Commercial Officer, Port of Long Beach

Rod Riseborough CEO, Container Trades Statistics

Bjorn Vang Jensen Vice President of Global Logistics, Electrolux

 


 

5:00 - 7:00 PM

WELCOME RECEPTION

LOCATION: The Galleon

 

SPONSORED BY:

Port of Shenzhen