October 10 - 12, 2017
Shenzhen, China

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 13

 

 

 

 

7:30 AM — 2:00 PM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Hotel Lobby

 

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 


 

7:30 — 8:25 AM

 

WELCOME COFFEE & TEA

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

8:25— 8:30 AM

 

 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 

 

Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 


 

8:30 — 9:45 AM

 

 

 

SUPPLY CHAIN VISIBILITY —
HOW IMPROVED DATA HELPS CUSTOMERS TRACK CARGO FROM ORIGIN TO DESTINATION

Location: Espana Ballroom I

Attaining better visibility of cargo in transit is increasingly seen as a competitive differentiator in supply chain capability. Better visibility means quicker access to greater amounts of information and data in the supply chain that allows for faster reaction to exception events and better overall supply chain planning and management. The technologies that support new levels of visibility are improving all the time and there is no shortage of service providers taking these technologies and turning them into supply chain management solutions.
Including executives from leading visibility solution providers, logistics service providers and shippers, the session will put aside the theory and look at the value these solutions are really delivering for customers today. It will look at how they are evolving, the cutting-edge technologies employed, and how far the digitization of supply chain planning and management can really take us.

 
— SPONSORED BY —

sponsor

 

— INTRODUCED BY —

Craig Halford
Global Sales Director,
XVELA

 

— SESSION CHAIR —

Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor for Global Ports,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Alex Lee
Logistics Director,
Sinotrans South China

 

Viezen Zhang
Vice President,
Supply Chain Division,
Elane Inc.

 

Patrick Lee
Adviser,
Nippon Express
(Former Regional Transportation Manager
with Motorola, Corning, and Philips)

 

Thorsten Meincke
Senior Vice President,
Global Seafreight,
Kuehne + Nagel


 

9:45 — 10:30 AM

 

 

 

CHINA'S CHANGING ECONOMY —
THE IMPACT OF FUTURE TRADE PATTERNS

Location: Espana Ballroom I

China has been imperative in the evolution of the global container shipping market as we know it. But as the Chinese economy is transitioning to a new phase in its development, it will significantly impact the prospects of the global economy. Seabury will deep-dive into China's trade and shipper statistics to assess the implications of the country's maturing economy on future trade flows. Topics include; shifting production, China’s rising middle class, E-commerce and emerging economies

 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER

Michel Looten
Director Maritime,
Seabury


 

10:30 — 11:00 AM

 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 


 

11:00 AM — 12:00 PM

 

 

RISING ASEAN —
WHAT IT MEANS FOR INTRA-ASIA TRADE 

Location: Espana Ballroom I

Southeast Asia continues to take a greater share of global manufacturing from China as companies increasingly seek new source markets because of the complexities of sourcing only in China. Steadily rising wages, labor shortages and improving social policies that add to the payroll are erasing cost advantages of producing goods in the country and causing retailers to adjust their strategies, using China as a hub and adding manufacturing centers in other countries. This has led to incredible growth in production in some countries. Electronics output in Vietnam, for example, has soared from $6.9 billion in 2011 to $45.8 billion last year. Coupled with rising production are local factors across Southeast Asian economies as a fast-growing middle class drives economic activity and stimulates trade between countries.

So what does this mean for intra-Asia trade and the shippers sourcing in the region? It means more containerized cargo volumes moving around the region and a rash of new intra-Asia services and mainline feeder connections, with growing doubts about ports’ abilities to handle them. Where are the congestion hot spots in the intra-Asia trade and what is being done to improve those ports? Will congestion surcharges become a fixture on the trade? Will larger vessels cascading down from the east-west trades add to the regional capacity and keep downward pressure on rates?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Lian Hoon Lim
Managing Director,
AlixPartners

 

— PANELISTS —

Gary So
Deputy Managing Director,
Kerry Logistics Network

 

Tim Wickmann
CEO,
MCC Transport

 

John McCauley
Vice President,
Transportation and Logistics,
Cargill

 

Jim Whalen
President,
INTTRA, Asia

 


 

12:00 — 1:00 PM

 

 

 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Ballroom II & Barcelona

 

 
 

 

1:00 — 2:30 PM

 

 

 

CHINA’S CROSS-BORDER TRADE — ADJUSTING TO THE E-COMMERCE PHENOMENON

Location: Espana Ballroom I

The link between rising consumption and online sales is becoming the most important source of growth in Asia’s cargo transportation and logistics industry. Industry executives correctly believe that, more than anything else, e-commerce is changing the way goods are connected to consumers. But they’re also unsure how to position themselves to benefit from the opportunities of this change. They struggle to create a picture of what the goods transportation landscape in Asia will look like in five to 10 years as a result of the e-commerce phenomenon and fear the impact of disrupters. While e-commerce expands throughout the region, China leads developing Asia in terms of policy to nurture the sector and this policy is increasingly shaping the dominant e-commerce supply chain models that are emerging.

The overall goal is to foster development of supply chains that use modern facilities and improved technological systems to better integrate retail, trade and logistics services for fast and efficient distribution that includes the provision of cross-border e-commerce-related services such as quality checks, cost-effective handling of returned items, and efficient and robust compliance management. The session will examine how e-commerce is changing the way goods are connected with consumers in Asia.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor for Global Ports,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

James Chang
Co-Founder and
Chief Operations Officer,
Lazada Crossborder

 

Kara Cheung
Managing Partner,
KCW and Associates

 

James Gagne
Chief Operating Officer,
Asia Pacific,
Seko Logisticss

 

 

 


 

2:30 — 3:30 PM

 

 

SHIPPER PERSPECTIVES —
A ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION WITH BCOs

Location: Espana Ballroom I

What does the future hold for trans-Pacific shipping and logistics? What implications will China’s slowdown have? Where is the industry headed in 2016 and beyond with larger ships, more port congestion and shippers’ continuing demands for leaner supply chains? Is true supply chain visibility a myth or achievable? These are all questions we'll be addressing throughout TPM Asia 2016, but in this session we'll get the shipper perspective from several prominent benefical cargo owners who also will offer deeper insight into the 1 1/2 days of issues- and solutions-based discussion.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Pat Moffett
Vice President,
International Logistics & Customs Compliance,
and Director, Corporate Recycling,
Voxx International Corp.

 

John McCauley
Vice President,
Transportation and Logistics,
Cargill

 


 

3:30 PM

 

 

 

CLOSING REMARKS

Location: Espana Ballroom I