October 10 - 12, 2017
Shenzhen, China

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

 

 
7:30 AM — 6:30 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Hotel Lobby

 

 
– SPONSORED BY –

sponsor


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

WELCOME COFFEE & TEA

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 

 
Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 


 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor, Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
Yoo Changkeun
President and CEO,
Hyundai Merchant Marine

 


 
9:45 — 10:15 AM
 

CHINA'S SLOWDOWN:
WHAT DOES IT REALLY MEAN?

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor, Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— SPEAKER —
Brian Jackson
Senior Economist,
China Regional Service,
IHS Markit

 


 
10:15 — 10:45 AM
 

NETWORKING COFFEE BREAK

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 
10:45 AM — 12:00 PM
 

ASIA SHIPPING OUTLOOK:
WHEN WILL THE MARKET TURN?

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Greg Knowler
Asia Editor,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Parash Jain
Head of Transport Research,
Asia-Pacific,
HSBC

 

Mario Moreno
Senior Economist,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Brian Jackson
Senior Economist,
China Regional Service,
IHS Markit

 


 
12:00 — 1:00 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 
1:00 — 2:00 PM
 

ALLIANCES SCORECARD:
ARE BCOS BETTER OFF OR WORSE?

Location: Espana Ballroom I

When TPM Asia opens, we’ll be six months into the container shipping alliance structure. The new alliances — the Ocean, THE and the pre-existing 2M (plus Hyundai Merchant Marine) — got off to a rocky start in April, contributing to chronic congestion in Shanghai. Beyond that, shippers have been forced to adapt to the changing networks and capacity deployment, cuts in direct port calls, changing cargo flows, and fewer alternatives. Now that shippers and carriers have gotten through their first peak shipping season under the new structure, this session will evaluate how the new system is working for shippers, carriers, and forwarders, while examining the following questions: Are BCOs getting the services they expect at the right price? Is container shipping better off with the new alliances, and are terminals able to cope with the bigger ships and greater volumes being channeled into fewer hubs?

 

 
– SPONSORED BY –

sponsor

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Alan Murphy
CEO and Partner,
SeaIntel Maritime Intelligence

 

Jean Yves Duval
Senior Vice President-Asia, CMA CGM

 

Paolo Montrone
Global Head of Trade,
Kuehne + Nagel

 

Joerg Hoppe
Director, Head of Ocean Freight,
North and Central China,
DB Schenker

 


 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

PORT PRODUCTIVITY IN THE MEGA-SHIP ERA

Location: Espana Ballroom I

It is well and truly the era of the mega-ship — and not the “paltry” 10,000- or 13,000-TEU variety. Of the nearly 1.7 million TEU of capacity to be delivered by the end of 2017, 55 percent, or 920,000 TEU, will be distributed on 54 vessels of 14,000 to 21,000 TEU. Maersk Line has been taking delivery of its 11-vessel order of 20,600-TEU second-generation Triple-Es. MOL took delivery of the 20,000- TEU MOL Triumph in March, and five more of the vessels will be phased into the Asia-Europe routes. Hong Kong’s OOCL also has received its first 21,100-TEU ship with another five vessels to follow. These giant vessels will operate on the Asia-Europe trade within the new alliances, cascading capacity downstream while making fewer direct port calls and driving up transshipment volume that hub ports will struggle to handle. Oman’s Port of Salalah, for example, put 10 cranes on a big Maersk Line ship. That might look good, but is it feasible, and can the quayside operations handle the volume that comes with that kind of crane setup? This session will analyze the latest generation of vessels entering the Asia-Europe trade and its impact on ports, terminals, landside transportation, and, most importantly, beneficial cargo owners. It will include a presentation of exclusive IHS Markit data measuring the latest trends in berth productivity.

 

 
– SPONSORED BY –

sponsor

 

— SESSION CHAIR —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor, Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Benjamin Lai
Managing Director-Dachan Bay,
Modern Terminals Ltd.

 

Gerry Yim
CEO,
HPH Trust

 

Dr. Jonathan Beard
Head of Transport and Logistics Asia,
Arcadis

 


 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 

 
 

 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 

THE ROLE OF THE NVOCC IN A CHANGING MARKET

Location: Espana Ballroom I

Non-vessel-owning common carriers have been steadily growing their business on the Asia-US trade since the early 1990s and now control approximately 40 percent of the market. What is behind the growth of the NVOCC business, and is this growth expected to continue considering the changing dynamics of the container shipping industry? A panel of industry executives also will examine the real role of the NVO and whether it's a friend or foe of the carrier, and how the many small-to-huge NVOs fit into the global landscape.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 


 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 

CHINA-EUROPE RAIL — AND BEYOND

Location: Espana Ballroom I

There is a trade off between price and speed to market, and increasingly speed is winning. This is the driving force behind a growing interest in the China-Europe rail option. It unlocks the western regions of China and provides electronics and even higher fashion shippers a new route to the markets of Europe. The rail route between China and Europe, and the backhaul leg, has moved from an exotic alternative to air and ocean to a viable and regularly requested transport solution. Forwarders are steadily connecting new services to the rail network out of China and building road routes linking countries across Southeast Asia and South Asia. But the landbridge rail route is believed to be heavily subsidized by Beijing, so what happens to rates when those subsidies end? Is the China-Europe rail even viable without heavy subsidies, and will the capacity be able to meet the growing demand?

 

 
 

 
5:30 — 7:00 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: The Galleon

 

 
– SPONSORED BY –

sponsor

 

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.