April 16 - 18, 2018
Houston, TX

Tuesday, April 17, 2018

 

 
8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
 

Registration

Location: Salons F-G

 

 
 

 
8:00 — 8:45 AM
 

Networking Breakfast

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 
8:45 — 9:00 AM
 

Welcome Remarks

Location: Salons F-G

 
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
JOC Events,
IHS Maritime & Trade

 

Roger Guenther
Executive Director,
Port Houston

 
9:00 — 9:30 AM
 

Keynote Address

Location: Salons F-G

 
— Introduced By —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
9:45 — 10:45 AM
 

Container Shipping Outlook:
Is The Gulf’s Surge Sustainable?

Location: Salons F-G

Container volume is rising faster at Gulf ports than at East and West coast ports, according to PIERS, a sister product of The Journal of Commerce within IHS Markit. The increase is driven by BCOs' concerns about West Coast ports, by regional population growth that has attracted import distribution centers and Asian all-water services, and by synthetic-resin exports that are beginning to soar. For example, Houston, the region's largest container port, registered growth of more than 33 percent in Asia imports over the first 11 months of 2017, as two new services came calling earlier in the year. That was part of overall growth of more than 31 percent in all imports moving through the Gulf, as ports in the region increased their share of all US imports by 0.7 percent during the period. These trends present beneficial cargo owners and ocean carriers with opportunities — and challenges. Resin exporters need additional vessel capacity in order to move their exports via the Gulf. Carriers say they need more higher-paying imports to justify larger ships or additional vessel strings. This shipper-carrier tension will influence the future of the Gulf container trade. Other factors include market growth, port efficiency, and intermodal service. This kickoff panel discussion will analyze the PIERS data and provide thought-provoking perspectives on the future of Gulf container shipping from major stakeholders in the region.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

 sponsor

 

— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelist —
Jeremy Ford
Head of Commercial,
APM Terminals North America

 

Daniel Hackett
Partner,
Hackett Associates

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

Networking Break

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

Importing Through The Gulf:
A Discussion with Beneficial Cargo Owners

Location: Salons F-G

The 31.2 percent surge in imports through the Gulf Coast in the first 11 months of 2017 is challenging the longtime dominance of exports at Gulf ports and have made the Gulf the fastest-growing US coast in container volume. Containerized imports now exceed exports at Houston, which handles nearly two-thirds of the Gulf’s container traffic. Mobile’s import volume rose 22.4 percent year-over-year during the first 10 months of 2017, to more than 100,000 TEU, and will rise further this year with Wal-Mart’s opening of a new import distribution center near the port. Beneficial cargo owners will explain and discuss the pros and cons of importing through the Gulf, including issues such as trucking, port efficiency, container availability, vessel capacity, and proximity to markets.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 
12:15 — 1:30 PM
 

Networking Lunch

Location: Salon E

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:00 PM
 

Analyzing The Resins Trade:
The Outlook from IHS Markit

Location: Salons F-G

 
— Introduced By —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelist —
Joel Morales
Executive Director,
Polyolefins Americas,
IHS Markit

 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

The Resins Crush is Here:
Are Ports and Equipment Providers Ready?

Location: Salons F-G

After years of planning and construction, the long-forecast surge in synthetic resin exports from the US Gulf is finally here. Dow Chemical, Chevron Phillips, and other producers have started production at large plants in recent months. More are on the way, and another wave of new capacity is forecast to be added within the next few years. How will the product be delivered to export markets? Can Gulf ports and service providers handle the additional volume, or will much of it be pushed to other coasts? Will demand for resin exports crowd out capacity for other export commodities such as cotton? Panelists will discuss vessel, truck, rail, and warehouse capacity, and the factors that influence decisions on whether to route resin shipments through Gulf ports or to use alternative gateways.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Chair —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Russ Boullion
Vice President, Commercial,
Warehousing & Packaging,
A&R Logistics

 

Christian M. Jensen
President,
Jensen Companies

 

Frank Vingerhoets
President,
Katoen Natie USA

 


 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

Networking Coffee Break

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 
3:30 — 4:30 PM
 

US-Mexico Trade:
How Will an Uncertain Landscape Affect Shippers?

Location: Salons F-G

Whether President Trump withdraws the US from the North American Free Trade Agreement or not, US trade with Mexico is on course to grow. Cross-border supply chains are linked at a deep level, and whatever trade agreements the US, Canada and Mexico agree upon, freight will keep moving. Indeed, after a declining in 2016, total US-Mexico trade increased more than 6 percent in the first 11 months of 2017, according to the US Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Division. That doesn't mean the flow of goods can't be improved, or that policy couldn't have an impact on how goods move. The bigger question may be how will the US economy and available transportation capacity affect cross-border freight. How will shippers, logistics companies and transportation operators cope with increased congestion at the border and uncertain policies in our nations' capitals? How will proposed changes affect shippers’ supply chains, and how should BCOs prepare?

 
— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelist —
Craig Mygatt
CEO,
SeaLand

 
4:30 — 5:30 PM
 

Another Hurricane Season is Upon Us:
Best Practices in Dealing With a Disaster

Location: Salons F-G

Hurricane Harvey and its floods emphasized the importance of disaster planning in supply chain management. Shippers, railroads, motor carriers, warehouse operators, ports, and other supply chain stakeholders are vulnerable to calamities such as hurricanes that periodically afflict the Gulf. Panelists will discuss lessons learned from recent weather-related disruptions, and will identify ways companies can prepare for them, minimize disruption, and recover quickly. The discussion will identify specific, actionable steps that companies can apply to their supply chains before, during, and after disasters.

 
— Session Chair —
Curtis Spencer
President,
IMS Worldwide

 

— Panelist —
Kyle Kristynik
President,
Jetco Delivery

 
5:30 — 7:00 PM
 

Networking Reception

Location: Texan Ballroom Foyer

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

 

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.