October 22 - 24, 2018
Oak Brook, IL

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

 

 

 
7:30 AM — 5:30 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Garden Court B

 

 
 

 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

WELCOME BREAKFAST

Location: Garden Court B

 

 
 

 

 


 
8:30 — 8:45 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Habersham Ballroom

 
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

Edward McCarthy
Chief Operating Officer,
Georgia Ports Authority

 
8:45 — 9:30 AM
 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Shippers caught between rapidly evolving e-commerce supply networks and uncertainty over transportation capacity and pricing will want to be in on this exclusive keynote Q&A with Mark Wallace, senior vice president for global engineering and sustainability at UPS, the largest US transportation provider. Wallace is charged with overseeing the optimized and efficient operations of UPS facilities, drivers and technologies, keeping freight flowing through the widest possible variety of modes and distribution channels. Tighter and faster fulfillment and replenishment cycles challenge UPS as much as any shipper, carrier, or third-party logistics provider, and drive a need for constant innovation throughout the organization. Wallace will discuss UPS’s vision of how shipping will change in this new digital era in an open conversation with JOC Senior Editor Bill Cassidy and the JOC Inland audience.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— KEYNOTE SPEAKER —
Mark Wallace
Senior Vice President,
Global Engineering and Sustainability,
UPS

 
9:30 — 10:45 AM
 

THE ROAD AHEAD:
NAVIGATING AN UNCERTAIN DISTRIBUTION LANDSCAPE

Location: Habersham Ballroom

In this long, often slow and sometimes turbulent economic recovery, uncertainty has become the new certainty. The failure of so many forecasts — the great truck capacity crunch of 2015, 2016 or 2017, for example — reflects an era in which the norms of business, technology and the US economy are under stress and changing rapidly. The US emerged from a two-year soft patch in domestic freight demand and pricing this year, but what should shippers and service providers expect 2018 bring? This panel of experts, supported by a wealth of data, will delve into the trends driving the US economy, freight demand, industrial distribution, trucking, and intermodal rail as 2017 nears its end.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Lee Klaskow
Senior Analyst,
Transportation and Logistics,
Bloomberg Intelligence

 

David Egan
Head of Industrial Research, Americas,
CBRE

 

Matthew Harding
Vice President,
Freight Market Intelligence Consortium,
Chainalytics

 

Lawrence J. Gross
President,
Gross Transportation Consulting

 


 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Garden Court B

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:00 PM
 

VIEW FROM THE TOP:
A CONVERSATION WITH INDUSTRY LEADERS

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Rapid advances in technology, online purchasing and an economy that routinely defies expectations are transforming the transportation and logistics landscape. How do today's logistics leaders, third-party logistics providers, industrial real estate developers, and trucking and intermodal executives read the trends? This roundtable discussion will provide context to the market indicators laid out in the preceding panel of analysts, while gauging the mindset and outlook of industry stakeholders as 2018 approaches. What do they expect in domestic transportation pricing, in warehousing and trucking capacity, in inventories and trade, and from Washington, DC? What are the trends and concerns keeping them on their toes all day and awake at night? And what are the logistics problems for which they are most eagerly pursuing solutions?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Michael P. Murphy
Chief Development Officer,
CenterPoint Properties

 

Darren Hawkins
President,
YRC Freight

 

Andrew Fuller
Assistant Vice President,
Domestic Intermodal,
Canadian National Railway

 

Bob Biesterfeld
President,
North American Surface Transportation,
C.H. Robinson Worldwide

 

Jeff Tucker
CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

 
12:00 — 12:45 PM
 

VIEW FROM THE TOP: THE SHIPPER PERSPECTIVE

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Good times or bad, shippers continually have to meet corporate objectives and deliver budgeted savings. That job is only getting more difficult as customer demands drive change from store fronts all the way back to supplier's docks. In 2018, shippers are likely to face a capacity and pricing challenge unlike anything they've seen in recent years. The preceding panels presented an expert view of the transportation market and the perspective of leading logistics service providers on the challenges of 2018. What's the perspective of their customers, those purchasing transportation services and shipping goods? How satisfied are they with service levels and what changes do they want to see? How can shippers overcome obstacles and, with help from their logistics providers, offer better value and service to their end customers? We'll discuss these and other topics with our panel of leading US logistics and transportation managers.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 

 

— PANELISTS —
Jeff LeClair
Vice President,
Manufacturing & Supply Chain,
Basin Holdings

 

Michelle Livingstone
Vice President of Transportation,
The Home Depot

 

John Janson
Global Logistics Director,
Sanmar

 

Terri Reid
Director,
Global Transportation and Supply Chain,
Famous Footwear, Caleres

 
12:45 — 1:45 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Garden Court B

 
 

 

 1:45 — 2:45 PM
 

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

 
 
         
 

 

 

PRICING STRATEGIES: TRANSPORTATION BIDDING

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Worried about year-end truck capacity and the potential for higher truck and intermodal rates, shippers in the first half of this year began to rethink how and when to put their transportation business up for bid. Comprehensive bids are becoming more common, experts in this field say, and shippers are turning to third parties for help. Shippers and 3PLs are using bidding strategically and tactically. The goal isn’t just to reduce costs by driving rates down, but also to cut shipper expenditures by optimizing entire freight networks. This panel will analyze how shipper strategies around RFPs are changing and how they can benefit.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Tommy Barnes
President,
Project44

 

— PANELISTS —
Brian Broadhurst
Vice President,
Transportation Solutions,
Spend Management Experts

 

John Colbern
Vice President,
Transportation Management,
Transplace

 

Brent Hutto
Chief Relationship Officer,
Truckstop.com
   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK I:
COLLABORATION — LET'S "WALK THE WALK"

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 1

For years, shippers and their transportation partners, whether carriers or 3PLs, have acknowledged the need for greater collaboration to reduce costs and improve efficiency for all. True collaboration has proved difficult, but the benefits can be proven, too. In this "inflationary" environment for transportation costs, finding ways to collaborate is more important than ever. How can we move beyond talk and "walk the walk"?

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Jeff LeClair
Vice President,
Manufacturing & Supply Chain,
Basin Holdings

 

   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK II:
ELDS — WHAT'S ON THE LINE FOR SHIPPERS?

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 2

Trucking operators may have gotten a bit of a reprieve when penalties for violating the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's electronic logging mandate were postponed until April 2018, but that doesn't make the situation any less urgent for shippers to make sure their carriers are complying with the federal rule. But how should they go about that with their trucking companies and brokers? What liabilities could they face if they contract or hire a trucker that isn’t compliant? How difficult will it be for carriers without ELDs to comply on deadline? We’ll discuss these and other issues as shippers prepare for the upcoming ELD age.

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Page Siplon
CEO,
TeamOne Logistics

 

   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK III:
SOURCING CAPACITY

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 3

Projections of a trucking capacity shortfall next year abound as the economy grows more rapidly, carriers struggle to hire drivers, and the electronic logging mandate looms. Shippers can hit that capacity wall, or find ways around it and over it to unlock hidden, or underutlizied, capacity. What are the best strategies and practices to pursue?

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Jeff Tucker
CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

 

 


 
2:45 — 3:15 PM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Habersham Ballroom

   

 

 3:15 — 4:15 PM
 

CONCURRENT BREAKOUT SESSIONS

   
         
 

 

 

PRICING INNOVATION:
THINKING OUTSIDE THE BOX

Location: Habersham Ballroom

As technology opens new possibilities for real-time, dynamic management of supply chains, shippers and carriers are rethinking how they determine freight rates. Tired of pricing methods that seem stuck in the 1980s? Feel that you don’t have control over how rates are set? This is a good time to think about alternatives. From dimensional LTL pricing to truckload rate futures, shippers have or shortly will have more options to determine and adjust rates than they’ve had in decades. This panel will discuss some of the latest innovations in pricing that could benefit shippers, 3PLs and trucking operators.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Craig Fuller
Managing Director and CEO,
TransFX

 

Lance Healy
Chief Innovation Officer,
Banyan Technology

 

Mark Montague
Industry Pricing Analyst,
DAT Solutions

 

Brian Thompson
Chief Commercial Officer,
SMC3
   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK I:
COLLABORATION — LET'S "WALK THE WALK"

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 1

For years, shippers and their transportation partners, whether carriers or 3PLs, have acknowledged the need for greater collaboration to reduce costs and improve efficiency for all. True collaboration has proved difficult, but the benefits can be proven, too. In this "inflationary" environment for transportation costs, finding ways to collaborate is more important than ever. How can we move beyond talk and "walk the walk"?

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Jeff LeClair
Vice President,
Manufacturing & Supply Chain,
Basin Holdings

 

   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK II:
ELDS — WHAT'S ON THE LINE FOR SHIPPERS?

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 2

Trucking operators may have gotten a bit of a reprieve when penalties for violating the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's electronic logging mandate were postponed until April 2018, but that doesn't make the situation any less urgent for shippers to make sure their carriers are complying with the federal rule. But how should they go about that with their trucking companies and brokers? What liabilities could they face if they contract or hire a trucker that isn’t compliant? How difficult will it be for carriers without ELDs to comply on deadline? We’ll discuss these and other issues as shippers prepare for the upcoming ELD age.

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Page Siplon
CEO,
TeamOne Logistics

 

   

 
 

 

 

THINK TANK III:
SOURCING CAPACITY

SPACE IS LIMITED AND BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Garden Court B: Table 3

Projections of a trucking capacity shortfall next year abound as the economy grows more rapidly, carriers struggle to hire drivers, and the electronic logging mandate looms. Shippers can hit that capacity wall, or find ways around it and over it to unlock hidden, or underutlizied, capacity. What are the best strategies and practices to pursue?

 
— THINK TANK LEADER —
Jeff Tucker
CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

 

 


 
4:15 — 5:00 PM
 

PLANNING FOR 2018:
THE SHIPPER-BROKER PERSPECTIVE

Location: Habersham Ballroom

The economy improved in 2017, but will it gain momentum or slip backward in 2018? Will over-the-road capacity tighten and transportation rates climb? Which modes will be most affected? How are shipping strategies changing? The second joint Shipper Outlook Survey released by The Journal of Commerce, NASSTRAC, the Transportation Intermediaries Association, and Truckstop.com takes the pulse of the domestic transportation market, asking shippers and brokers about their expectations for the year ahead. This panel will reveal and analyze the results, based on the views of those at the nerve center of the North American transportation market.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Roxanne Bullard
Director of Research,
Truckstop.com

 

Gail Rutkowski
Executive Director,
NASSTRAC,
and President,
Wabash Worldwide Logistics

 

Chris Burroughs
Senior Director,
Government Affairs,
Transportation Intermediaries Association

 

 


 
5:00 — 6:30 PM
 

NETWORKING RECEPTION

Location: Garden Court B

 
– SPONSORED BY –

sponsor

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:
All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.