October 22 - 24, 2018
Oak Brook, IL

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

 

 

 
7:30 AM — 3:00 PM
 

REGISTRATION

Location: Garden Court B

 

 
 

 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Garden Court B

 

 
 

 

 


 
8:30 — 8:35 AM
 

WELCOME REMARKS

Location: Habersham Ballroom

 
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 
8:35 — 9:00 AM
 

THE AUTOMATED SUPPLY CHAIN:
A TED-STYLE TALK

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Autonomous trucks, warehouse robots, and delivery drones grab a lot of the headlines and public attention, but automation also is spreading throughout every nook and cranny of the supply chain. Some of the results will be startling, others less obvious. Joe Dunlap, managing director of supply chain services for industrial real estate developer CBRE, will share his unique perspective on how automation will affect the supply chain, and transportation, as a whole.

 
— INTRODUCED BY —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— FEATURED SPEAKER —
Joe Dunlap
Managing Director,
Supply Chain Services,
CBRE

 
9:00 — 10:00 AM
 

VISIBILITY: HOW TO GET A CLEARER VIEW

Location: Habersham Ballroom

“Visibility” is on the tip of every supply chain manager’s tongue, but how many shippers truly have visibility? What does the term really mean? More data is streaming toward carriers and shippers from the supply chain than ever, but big data isn't always smart data. And, even if we can pinpoint a shipment location in real time, how do we use that knowledge to manage risk and better serve customers? This session will explore how shippers can use visibility to make the leap from reacting to crises to proactive risk management.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Dave Halsema
Executive Vice President,
Partner Alliances,
MacroPoint

 

Greg Smith
Enterprise Consultant,
Tech Mahindra

 

Barry Conlon
CEO,
Overhaul Group Inc.

 
10:00 — 10:15 AM
 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Garden Court B

 
 

 
10:15 — 11:15 AM
 

ELDs: THREE MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT

Location: Habersham Ballroom

After years of development, lawsuits and appeals, electronic logging devices are just around the corner. Starting in mid-December, truck drivers across the country — from small-owner operators and drayage carriers to the largest truckload and LTL operators — will have to scrap the paper logbooks they’ve used since the 1930s in favor of some type of ELD. The immediate goal of the transition, mandated by Congress in 2012, is to improve enforcement of driver hours-of-service regulations. But getting ELDs into more than 3 million trucks before the deadline is a major undertaking, and one projected to cost trucking operators more than $1 billion. Training those truck drivers to use ELDs also could take months, a period in which productivity may decline. The regulation also poses a big challenge to shippers in the US, forcing them to take a hard look at their carriers and brokers and to rethink their shipping networks. Just weeks before ELDs take effect, many questions remain: How will shippers and brokers ensure their carriers are complying with the law, and what liabilities could they face if they contract or hire a trucker who isn’t? How difficult will it be for carriers without ELDs to comply on deadline? What if the mandate cuts into truck capacity? This session will discuss these issues and more to help you prepare for the ELD mandate.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Willis
National News Anchor and On-Air Host,
"Road Dog Trucking,"
Sirius XM Satellite Radio

 

— PANELISTS —
Thayne Boren
General Manager,
Truckstop.com

 

John Seidl
Transportation Consultant,
Integrated Risk Solutions

 

Eric Lien
Senior Vice President,
Corporate Development,
Arrive Logistics

 

Norm Ellis
President,
North America,
EROAD Inc.

 
11:15 AM — 12:00 PM
 

DISRUPTION, RESILIENCY, AND RECOVERY:
LESSONS LEARNED FROM HARVEY AND IRMA

Location: Habersham Ballroom

It's been years since a pair of hurricanes like Harvey and Irma walloped the US, causing perhaps $300 billion in economic damage felt far inland from the Gulf Coast and Atlantic. The hurricanes couldn't have hit at a worse time for shippers — US surface transportation capacity was already tightening and prices were rising when the storm winds blew in. We're still dealing with the aftermath, and will be for months, perhaps in unexpected ways. What are the specific logistics lessons we can draw from this year's superstorms and how can we build more resilient, if not totally storm-proof, supply chains?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
Breakbulk and Project Cargo,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Aaron Parrott
Specialist Leader,
Supply Chain and Manufacturing Operations,
Deloitte Consulting

 

Amos Rogan
LTL Operations Leader,
Averitt Express

 

Patrick Maher
Executive Vice President,
Gulf Winds International

 
12:00 — 1:00 PM
 

NETWORKING LUNCH

Location: Garden Court B

 
 

 
1:00 — 2:00 PM
 

NAFTA:
WHY US-MEXICAN TRADE WILL KEEP ON TRUCKING

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Whether President Trump withdraws the US from NAFTA or not, US trade with Mexico is on course to grow. Cross-border supply chains are linked at a deep level, and whatever trade agreements the US, Canada and Mexico agree upon, freight will keep moving. Indeed, after a declining in 2016, total US-Mexico trade soared more than 23 percent in the first seven months this year, according to the US Census Bureau's Foreign Trade Division. That doesn't mean the flow of goods can't be improved, or that policy couldn't have an impact on how goods move. The bigger question may be how will the US economy and available transportation capacity affect cross-border freight. How will shippers, logistics companies and transport operators cope with increased congestion at the border and uncertain policies in our nations' capitals?

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit
 

 

— PANELISTS —
Erik Bo Hansen
Vice President,
Sales & Marketing Intermodal,
Kansas City Southern Railway

 

Jose Minarro
Customs Brokerage Director,
Transplace Mexico LLC

 

Craig Callahan
Senior Vice President,
Sales Werner Enterprises

 

Jackie Dixon
Corporate Senior Procurement Manager,
Rheem Corp.

 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

E-COMMERCE: FIRST TO THE LAST MILE

Location: Habersham Ballroom

Thanks to the fulfillment machine called Amazon, the last or final mile is now the first thing shippers think about when they receive orders, whether for industrial freight or consumer goods. As shippers struggle with rapid fulfillment strategies, their logistics and transportation partners are trying to determine where they fit in the first, middle and final miles of a door-to-door shipment. The last mile, in particular, brings challenges to both shippers fulfilling orders and carriers executing them. And exponential growth in online shopping means the goals keep moving for all parties. This panel, fittlingly, our own last mile, examines where last-mile logistics is headed.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— PANELISTS —
Michelle Ellwanger
Senior Vice President,
Operations,
NonStopDelivery Inc.

 

Melissa Runge
Vice President,
Analytical Solutions,
Spend Management Experts

 

Tim O'Brien
Senior Director,
Supply Chain,
Purchasing Power LLC

 
3:00 PM
 

CLOSING REMARKS

Location: Habersham Ballroom

 
 

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:
All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.