September 18 - 20, 2018
Hamburg, Germany

Thursday, September 20, 2018

 

 

 
8:00 AM — 5:00 PM
 

Registration

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

 
 

 


 
8:00 — 9:00 AM
 

 Welcome Coffee & Tea

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

 
 

 
9:00 — 9:05 AM
 

Welcome Remarks

Location: Saal 1-2

 
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
9:05 — 9:45 AM
 

One-on-One:
A Conversation With Kuehne + Nagel CEO Dr. Detlef Trefzger

Location: Saal 1-2

Kuehne + Nagel, the largest world's ocean freight forwarder, has positioned itself at the forefront of technology in logistics, leveraging big data, machine learning, and AI to deliver new forms of value to customers. For example, its Sea Explorer tool employs big data to provide constantly updated vessel ETAs based on known factors such as weather, port turnaround times, and vessel speeds. In what is certain to be a fascinating conversation with K+N's Chief Executive Detlef Trefzger, led by DW Chief Diplomatic Correspondent Melinda Crane, the fast-changing technology landscape will be explored in-depth.

 
— Session Chair —
Dr. Melinda Crane
Chief Correspondent,
Deutsche Welle TV,
USA and Germany

 

— Featured Speaker —
Dr. Detlef Trefzger
CEO,
Kuehne + Nagel International AG

 
9:45 — 10:45 AM
 

JOC Innovation Jam I:
What Problems Can Technology Really Solve?

Location: Saal 1-2

Can the innovative use of logistics technology really solve problems international BCOs face moving freight to, from, and within Europe? The JOC editorial team has challenged technology providers to propose how they would solve actual pain points afflicting shippers, problems that include visibility, procurement, forecasting, and data analytics, to name a few. A select group of those providers will face a panel of shipper judges in the first of a two-part "Innovation Jam" to discuss proposed solutions selected by shippers before the conference, with the panel choosing the tech provider presenting the most compelling case. Attendees will hear about a cross-section of the most promising logistics technology, and the judging panel will vote on the solution that most convincingly addresses the pain point it addresses, with the winner announced at the end of the jam.

 
— Session Chair —
Eric Johnson
Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Michael Braun
Vice President,
Customer Solutions,
Xeneta

 

Annika Sorensen
Chief Financial Officer,
Sensor Transport

 

Michael Wax
Co-Founder and Chief Commercial Officer,
FreightHub

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

 Networking Coffee Break

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

JOC Innovation Jam II:
What Problems Can Technology Really Solve?

Location: Saal 1-2

Can the innovative use of logistics technology really solve problems international BCOs face moving freight to, from, and within Europe? The JOC editorial team has challenged technology providers to propose how they would solve actual pain points afflicting shippers, problems that include visibility, procurement, forecasting, and data analytics, to name a few. A select group of those providers will face a panel of shipper judges in the second of a two-part "Innovation Jam" to discuss proposed solutions selected by shippers before the conference, with the panel choosing the tech provider presenting the most compelling case. Attendees will hear about a cross-section of the most promising logistics technology, and the judging panel will vote on the solution that most convincingly addresses the pain point it addresses, with the winner announced at the end of the jam.

 
 — Session Chair —
Eric Johnson
Senior Editor,
Technology,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

 — Panelists —
Robin Jaacks
Chief Commercial Officer,
Ocean Insights

 

Carl Lauron
Founder and CEO,
BuyCo

 

Ivan Tintore
Executive President and Co-Founder,
iContainers

 
12:15 — 1:15 PM
 

 Networking Lunch

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

 
 

 1:15 — 2:15 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Route Optimization:
A Strategic Analysis of Supply Chain Costs

Location: Saal 1-2

With already-increasing European freight volumes expected to continue to grow rapidly, the only way for supply chains to keep up is to improve efficiency that will drive down costs. This session will feature two supply chain experts examining ways to improve management of the international transportation of containers and addressing how shippers can lower the costs of long-distance intermodal shipments through best practices. Thierry Vanelslander of the University of Antwerp's Department of Transport and Logistics will explain his chain cost model that allows shippers to quickly and accurately determine the actual door-to-door costs of using a particular Asia-Europe route, comparing different modes of transport, or using different port gateways. This is particularly important for shippers setting up business continuity plans to be deployed during disruptions, such as the two-month closure of the main Rhine-Alpine rail link between the Mediterranean and North Europe in August 2017, and ongoing barge congestion at Rotterdam and Antwerp that pushes shippers onto the road, adding 30 percent to their inland transport costs. Vanelslander will present a chain cost model that scrutinises routes and modal options and compares their costs on the Asia-Europe and Europe-US trades, providing insight into the real cost of container transport. He will be joined by Sergio Barbarino, chairman of the European Technology Platform ALICE, who will address innovations in technology that offer shippers and service providers to cut costs by lowering their carbon footprints and by implementing a so-called synchromodality strategy that, once integrated into a shipper's supply chain management platform, gives cargo owners the flexibility to shift volume between modes as required.

 
— Session Chair —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Sergio Barbarino
Chairman,
European Technology Platform,
ALICE

 

Thierry Vanelslander
Assistant Professor,
Department of Transport and Regional Economics,
University of Antwerp
   

 
 

 

 

Emerging South Europe Gateways:
Are They Ready for Prime Time?

Location: Saal 7-9

Not many ports in the Mediterranean are suited to the high-volume, big-ship China trade, but as volume increases, investment in infrastructure is pouring into many ports across South Europe and into the intermodal links that connect the Med to Europe's hinterland. Shippers involved with the factories in Hungary and other Southeast Europe destinations are increasingly sending containers in and out of ports such as Koper, Slovenia. Cosco Shipping is investing hundreds of millions of dollars in the Greek hub of Piraeus, and Italy is strengthening its intermodal connections with Central Europe from Genoa, La Spezia, and Cagliari. Ports in Spain and France are also in the mix. But the old rule that it is cheaper to keep cargo on the water than haul it overland is relevant considering the mega-ships deployed on Asia-Europe and the reduced slot costs they generate. So, will Mediterranean ports capture a greater share of North Europe-bound cargo, or is business growth the most they can hope for?

 
— Session Chair —
Jolke A. Helbing
Director,
Royal Haskoning

 

— Panelists —
Marzia Cicchetti
Customer Service & Marketing Supervisor,
PSA Voltri

 

Nicola Gardenia
Key Account Manager North/South Corridor,
Captrain Italia

 

Ivan Perič
Sales Manager,
Sales and Marketing Department (RIC),
Port of Luka Koper

 2:15 — 3:15 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

LCL Shipping:
What Is Behind the Growth?

Location: Saal 1-2

Data on less-than-container load shipping may not be comprehensive, but there is no doubt that the shipping of LCL cargo is growing strongly across the major trades. On trades to and from the United States, US imports of consolidated cargo rose almost 10 percent, to 209,454 TEU, compared with a decline of 1.3 percent in the first three months of last year, according to data from PIERS, a sister company of the JOC within IHS Markit. Forwarders consolidating this cargo have cited reasons that include the rise of e-commerce, more frequent shipping, and technology enabling supply chain monitoring and optimization. But whatever the reasons, it appears the changing nature of global trade flows and an evolving supply chain have created an environment where shipping smaller consignments more frequently often makes sense. This session will delve into the topic and examine the benefits and challenges to shippers when choosing to send cargo as LCL.

 
— Session Chair —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Klaus Jepsen
Group CEO,
Shipco Transport

 

Claudio Scandella
CEO,
ECU Worldwide

 

Sanjay Tejwani
Senior Vice President and
Global Head of LCL Product,
DHL Global Forwarding
   

 
 

 

 

Case Study: Short-Sea Solutions to Logistics Challenges Within Europe

Location: Saal 7-9

Global agricultural equipment manufacturer AGCO is undergoing a supply chain transformation. The Duluth, Georgia-based company developed the award-winning Smart Logistics concept, triggering the need to optimize the flow of inputs from a direct supplier in southern Germany to its production plant in Linnavouri, Finland. AGCO requires a reliable, flexible, and cost-effective mode of transportation with key criteria including seasonality, flexible access to capacity, inventory cost control, and environmental footprint reduction. The solution: Unifeeder's Shortsea Services division tailored a reliable multimodal transportation system for AGCO. The combination of rail and truck pre-carriage, shipment by sea and delivery by truck connects AGCO's supplier in Amberg, Germany, to one of its production facilities in Finland. Regular short-sea departures from Rotterdam and Hamburg ensure competitive lead time and frequency, with Unifeeder guaranteeing sufficient capacity. AGCO's 4PL partner 4flow acts as a control tower to coordinate the shipments between the parties involved. This case study will analyze how an end-to-end solution involving short-sea shipping can offer a competitive, reliable, and environmentally friendly mode of transportation for shippers moving goods within Europe.

 
— Introduction by —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Dennis Lemke
General Manager Sales,
Central Europe,
Unifeeder

 

Istvan Szakacs
Project Engineer,
Transportation and Logistics, EME,
AGCO

 
3:15 — 3:45 PM
 

 Networking Coffee Break

Location: Saal 1-2 Foyer

 
 

 3:45 — 4:45 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Case Study:
Cutting Off the Flow of Counterfeit Goods

Location: Saal 1-2

Walk the streets of any big city, and you see them: fake Gucci handbags and Rolex watches. But counterfeits aren't just about handbags and watches. There are fake medicines, fake shampoos and deodorants, razor blades and detergents. What else have you consumed that you thought was real but was actually made by criminals without any quality control? Even your ships might contain fake ball bearings. How do you make sure your own supply chain isn't full of fakes? According to a 2016 report by the European Union Intellectual Property Office and the Organization of Economic Cooperation, $461 billion in counterfeit goods moved through international trade in 2013. In a summer 2017 follow-up, the two organizations found that smugglers of counterfeit goods are using Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, and Singapore as their main global trading hubs. Four transit points — Albania, Egypt, Morocco, and Ukraine — are key to introducing fake goods into Europe, and Panama is an important transit point for US-bound counterfeit goods, according to the new report. Further, some 75 percent of those goods move by ocean container, the OECD and EUIPO found. In short, criminal networks have enormous opportunities to abuse this critical supply chain channel to transport huge volumes of counterfeit products affecting virtually every product sector. But companies that transport these goods are key intermediaries in stopping this flow of counterfeits, and brand owners and shipping industry interests have signed a declaration of intent aimed at preventing the maritime transport of counterfeit goods. This case study will bring together some of these companies to discuss how they are working together to stop the transport of counterfeit goods on container ships, the challenges they face, the steps they are taking to stop the criminal infiltration of the supply chain, and what more can be done collaboratively to stop the shipment of fake goods.

 
— Session Chair —
Toe Su Aung
Senior Policy Advisor,
ICC BASCAP
and Director,
Elipe Limited

 

— Panelists —
Laurent Audaz
Head of P&I Insurance,
Legal & Claims,
Mediterranean Shipping Co.

 

Meena Sayal
Global Brand Protection Director,
Unilever
   

 
 

 

 

Case Study:
Using Southern European Gateway Ports to Improve Supply Chain Performance

Location: Saal 7-9

The example of thyssenkrupp moving automotive components shows the possibilities of using southern European port gateways in ways that reduce costs and improve reliability, even for shipments moving to or from interior regions, such as southern Germany, traditionally accessible only via the Northern European port range. The door-to-door lead time can be reduced by five days, compared to loading in Northwest Continent ports in Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands. In February, thyssenkrupp began using Genoa, La Spezia, and Livorno to move weekly container loads out of Liechtenstein, resulting in savings on direct shipping costs and indirect inventory costs, given the five- to eight-day savings in transit times. In this in-depth case study, the company will describe what led it to use southern gateway ports and what the experience has been, for the purpose of helping other European shippers assess the opportunity to achieve similar benefits in their own container supply chains.

 
— Session Introduction —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Daniel Martin
Vice President and Co-Founder,
SNAcargo

 
4:45 PM
 

Closing Remarks

Location: Saal 1-2

 
 

 

 

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.