October 22 - 24, 2018
Oak Brook, IL

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

 

 

 
7:30 AM — 5:30 PM
 

Registration

 
 

 


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

 Welcome Breakfast

 
 

 
8:30 — 8:45 AM
 

Welcome Remarks

 
Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
8:45 — 9:30 AM
 

Keynote Address

 
 

 
9:30 — 10:45 AM
 

North American Freight Outlook:
When Will the Market Turn?

The “great truck capacity crunch” forecast for so many years finally arrived in 2017, snarling supply chains across North America and sending ripples of disruption overseas as importers struggled to get freight from US ports inland at a reasonable cost. Truck transit times were lengthened by as much as a day or more this spring as electronic logging led many truck drivers to more carefully monitor time behind the wheel. Supply chains are expected to be stretched thin as the pre-holiday peak this fall builds toward its crescendo, with enormous pressure applied at inland markets to get freight through the middle-mile and make last-mile deliveries. Shippers need answers to questions of port selection, modal choice, capacity, inland routing, and price. In the past year, shippers have had to work much harder to find and even create freight capacity and pay much more to move freight. Will 2019 be different? Will the market turn? This panel of experts, supported by a wealth of data, will delve into what’s driving the US economy, freight demand, trucking and intermodal, and pricing as we look to 2019.

 
— Session Chair —
Chris G. Christopher Jr., Ph.D.
Executive Director,
Economics,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Chris Christopher
Executive Director, Economics
IHS Markit

 

Lawrence J. Gross
President,
Gross Transportation Consulting

 

Daniel Hackett
Partner,
Hackett Associates

 

Lee Klaskow
Senior Analyst,
Transportation & Logistics,
Bloomberg Intelligence

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

 Networking Break

 
 

 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

View From the Top:
A Discussion With Industry Leaders

There's never been greater need for cooperation and outright collaboration across the inland distribution supply chain, from the shippers to port operators, third-party logistics companies, freight brokers and forwarders, warehousing and distribution firms, and trucking and intermodal carriers. Only by breaking down walls that separate these groups can we even attempt to solve the capacity and cost crises we face. This roundtable discussion will provide context to the market indicators laid out by the preceding panel of analysts, while gauging the mindset and outlook of industry stakeholders as 2018 draws to what looks to be a frenzied close, and as 2019 approaches. What do they expect in imports and exports, domestic transportation volumes and pricing, in warehousing and trucking capacity, in inventories and trade, and, with mid-term elections approaching, from Washington, D.C.? What keeps them on their toes all day and awake at night? Finally, what are the logistics problems for which they are most eagerly pursuing solutions, and how can they find those solutions together?

 
— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Craig Callahan
Executive Vice President and
Chief Commercial Officer,
Werner Enterprises

 

Matthew Gordon
Director,
Transportation,
Anheuser-Busch InBev

 

Dr. Noel Hacegaba
Chief Commercial & Operations Officer,
Port of Long Beach, California

 

Frank McGuigan
CEO,
Transplace

 
12:15 — 1:30 PM
 

 Networking Lunch

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

Inland Markets:
An Overview of Chicago and Beyond

Surging North American freight demand collided with capacity imbalances and regulatory constraints in 2018, reshaping transportation markets. Intermodal drayage and trucking resources came under enormous pressure, especially in Chicago, but in many other leading markets, too, forcing shippers to redraw distribution maps and scramble to find new routes and solutions to meet the delivery demands of their own customers. This panel, the first of its kind at the JOC Inland Distribution Conference, will dig into the leading causes of congestion, rising costs and rates and capacity shortages plaguing the most important US inland hubs, starting with the largest of all, Chicago. But every individual hub is part of a bigger network that starts at the seaport and ends with a last-mile delivery. How does disruption at one node in this network affect the others? How is electronic logging and stricter trucking hours-of-service enforcement affecting transit times in specific lanes, and what does that mean to freight fluidity? Where do we need more intermodal yards and drayage resources? And what real-estate decisions do shippers face as they try to correct capacity imbalances and move warehouses and distribution centers closer to their customers? This panel of experts will lay out the broad themes and issues facing evolving inland distribution markets before we take a deeper dive into solutions for individual markets in a series of Think Tanks.

 
 Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Chair —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

— Panelists —
Bobby Harris
CEO,
BlueGrace Logistics

 

Jason Hilsenbeck
President and Founder,
Drayage.com and LoadMatch Inc.

 

Mark Montague
Senior Analyst,
DAT Solutions

 
2:30 — 3:00 PM
 

 Networking Break

   

 3:00 — 4:00 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Trucking in the ELD Era

Just a few years ago, trucking was said to be on its way to becoming a commodity in North America. You don’t hear that talk about commoditization any more. Truck pricing soared in 2018, with contract and spot rates rising. Buoyed by higher revenue, profits and tax savings, trucking companies reinvested in their fleets. But the shortage of truck drivers, among large carriers, at least, has kept a cap on capacity. Electronic logging also took a bite out of capacity as drivers cut back on the time they spend behind the wheel and transit times grew longer, with next-day freight shading into two-day freight. Trucking companies increasingly are investing resources in more specialized services such as dedicated trucking, which provide a higher return than transactional, over-the-road services. They’re asking for even bigger rate increases to pay drivers, and putting pressure on customers who fall short of being so-called shippers of choice. Freight is shifting among truckload, LTL, and ground parcel carriers as e-commerce grows and delivery demands become harder to meet. New technologies such as autonomous trucks and electric vehicles offer glimpses of new business models and efficiencies that are tantalizing, but still not within easy reach. This panel will look at the biggest issues confronting truckers and shippers as they navigate higher costs, modal choices, rate hikes, labor issues, clashes over detention practices, end-customer service demands, and more. Will the trucking market turn in 2019, or are we entering a new era of innovation and collaboration for this industry?

 
— Session Chair —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Mitchell Kinney
Manager,
Domestic Logistics,
Sanmar

 

Andrew Lynch
Co-Founder,
President,
Zipline Logistics

 

Mike Regan
Chief Relationship Officer,
TranzAct Technologies

 

Jeff Tucker
CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

 

Andy Vanzant
Vice President,
Operations,
Covenant Transportation
   

   

 Regional Think Tanks: JOC Inland Market Report

   
    Think tanks at the 2018 JOC Inland Distribution Conference will offer deep-dive analysis of the specific challenges and potential solutions at five US inland hubs: Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Atlanta, Memphis, and the Lehigh Valley/Harrisburg, Pa. Led by industry experts in each region, these shipper-focused, hour-long sessions will go beyond the preceding general session’s overview of inland markets, and offer intimate discussion for no more than 20 attendees per session. The think tanks will be followed by a half-hour, general session wrap-up and Q&A with our think tank leaders. Space for the think tanks is limited and by reservation only. (Note: Because of expected high demand, the Chicago think tank will be held at both times: 3:00-4:00 and 4:00-5:00.)    
         
 

 

 

Think Tank I:
Inland Markets — Chicago

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

Each day, about 500 trains move freight through Chicago, according to the Association of American Railroads. About 25 percent of US freight rail traffic and 46 percent of all intermodal traffic begins, ends, or travels through the Windy City. It’s also one of the most congested North American rail chokepoints. Truckers struggle to find chassis at grounded rail ramps and it’s not uncommon for the railroads with wheeled operations to mount a container on the wrong chassis, costing drivers time on hauls subject to an electronic logging device. It’s also becoming harder to find a driver to deliver a container to Detroit, Indianapolis, or Green Bay because some of these round trips are nearly impossible to do in a single workday. Traffic is also a big problem: a 2017 study by transportation analytics company INRIX found the average driver wastes 57 hours in Chicago traffic each year, eighth worst in the US. Prices to secure land for a warehouse in the Chicago area also aren’t, rising 16 percent last year with an average price per acre of $250,000, according to industrial real estate developer CBRE. Space Is Limited and by Reservation Only

 
 — Think Tank Leaders —
Robert Howard
Chief Operating Officer,
Dohrn Transfer

 

Jon Krystek
Chief Operating Officer,
Knichel Logistics

 

Steven Teune
Operations Manager,
Acme Transportation
   

 
 

 

 

Think Tank II:
Inland Markets — Atlanta

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

This Georgia metropolitan hub is a starting or midpoint for shippers to consolidate freight moving to Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and the Carolinas. Peaches, blueberries, corn, and other fruits and vegetables grown in the state will be moved around the country during the harvest. Big-box retailers, automakers, and other small and mid-sized manufacturers also station themselves in Georgia and neighboring South Carolina to move freight into and out of the port in Savannah, served by CSX Transportation and Norfolk Southern Railway. Forest and paper manufacturers use Georgia and South Carolina as the gateway to export their products overseas. Poultry producers also send food from the rural parts of Georgia to export from Savannah. Like other major cities, though, traffic and warehousing are a challenge in Atlanta. Transportation analytics company INRIX estimated drivers waste 70 hours a year in traffic, the fourth worst in the US. Warehousing pricing also shot up by 14 percent in 2017 and lease rates by $4.75 per square foot, according to industrial real estate developer CBRE, and transloading in Savannah is growing as a result.

 
— Think Tank Leaders —
Jess Baumhoff
Manager,
Middle Mile Logistics,
Wayfair

 

David Bennett
President,
Americas,
Globe Express Services

 

Robert Burnsed
Executive Vice President,
Atlantic Intermodal

 

Kyle Kottke
General Manager,
Kottke Trucking

 

Page Siplon
CEO,
TeamOne Logistics

 

   

 
 

 

 

Think Tank III:
Inland Markets — Lehigh Valley and Harrisburg, Pa.

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

From Pittsburgh to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is historically an industrial state. But with consumers increasingly demanding speed of delivery for their e-commerce purchases and warehousing prices skyrocketing in New York and New Jersey, the I-81 and I-76 corridor in the Lehigh Valley is quickly becoming the place to set up to deliver consumer goods into the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic, especially in the food industry. In the past, truckers ran between Chicago and Pennsylvania in a single workday, but it appears that practice has dwindled with electronic logging devices because this is really a two-day trip. Real estate is a hot commodity in the corridor. Lease rates in 2017 averaged $11.50 per square foot in northern New Jersey and $5.85 in Pennsylvania, both up double-digits. Traveling into the tri-state area is no easy task, either. Transportation analytics company INRIX reported that drivers spent an average of 91 hours annually in traffic in the New York City-New Jersey-Connecticut-eastern Pennsylvania corridor, second only to Los Angeles in the US.

 
— Think Tank Leaders —
Kristy Knichel
President and CEO,
Knichel Logistics

 

Ed Nagle
CEO,
Nagle Cos.

 

James Osborn
Manager of Logistics and
Process Improvement,
Hanover Foods Corporation

 

Sheila W. Weatherly
Director of Pricing,
Knichel Logistics

 


 4:00 — 5:00 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         

 

 

Drayage and Intermodal Rail:
Relieving the Choke Points

Relieving the Choke Points This year brought great opportunity to railroads and intermodal rail operators, as trucking rates and transit times climbed. But that opportunity was hard to realize. Drayage at ports and inland railyards proved a challenge, with drayage truckers hit by the same hours-of-service issues, thanks to electronic logging, as their general freight counterparts. Not only do they face delays in picking up freight, but drayage drivers often also have to track down chassis. Intermodal rail operators trying to improve train velocity and scheduling often found drayage issues, and congestion blamed on high demand and even bunching of containers at seaports, worked against them. Even so, intermodal pricing, especially spot rates, leaped as capacity tightened. Will intermodal rail run more smoothly in 2019? How can the sector reach its potential? This session will answer these questions and more.

 
— Session Chair —
Lawrence J. Gross
President,
Gross Transportation Consulting

 

— Panelist —
Patrick Maher
Executive Vice President,
Gulf Winds International

 

Jon Slangerup
Chairman and CEO,
American Global Logistics
   

   

 Regional Think Tanks: JOC Inland Market Report

   
    Think tanks at the 2018 JOC Inland Distribution Conference will offer deep-dive analysis of the specific challenges and potential solutions at five US inland hubs: Chicago, Dallas-Fort Worth, Atlanta, Memphis, and the Lehigh Valley/Harrisburg, Pa. Led by industry experts in each region, these shipper-focused, hour-long sessions will go beyond the preceding general session’s overview of inland markets, and offer intimate discussion for no more than 20 attendees per session. The think tanks will be followed by a half-hour, general session wrap-up and Q&A with our think tank leaders. Space for the think tanks is limited and by reservation only. (Note: Because of expected high demand, the Chicago think tank will be held at both times: 3:00-4:00 and 4:00-5:00.)    
         
 

 

 

Think Tank I:
Inland Markets — Chicago

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

Each day, about 500 trains move freight through Chicago, according to the Association of American Railroads. About 25 percent of US freight rail traffic and 46 percent of all intermodal traffic begins, ends, or travels through the Windy City. It’s also one of the most congested North American rail chokepoints. Truckers struggle to find chassis at grounded rail ramps and it’s not uncommon for the railroads with wheeled operations to mount a container on the wrong chassis, costing drivers time on hauls subject to an electronic logging device. It’s also becoming harder to find a driver to deliver a container to Detroit, Indianapolis, or Green Bay because some of these round trips are nearly impossible to do in a single workday. Traffic is also a big problem: a 2017 study by transportation analytics company INRIX found the average driver wastes 57 hours in Chicago traffic each year, eighth worst in the US. Prices to secure land for a warehouse in the Chicago area also aren’t, rising 16 percent last year with an average price per acre of $250,000, according to industrial real estate developer CBRE.

 
 
   

 

 

 

Think Tank II:
Inland Markets — Memphis

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

From big-box retailers to cotton manufacturers, the Memphis market is a hub with supply chain challenges on the road, rails and in finding chassis. Traffic on Interstate 40 can slow the delivery of freight. Construction near BNSF Railway’s facility on Lamar Avenue also is causing bottlenecks. Truckers complain about the condition of Holmes Road near Shelby Drive. If you’re visiting the Union Pacific Railroad terminal in West Memphis, plan ahead as you’ll need to cross the Mississippi River. The Canadian National and BNSF railyards suffer from chassis shortages, wasting time that truckers don’t have to hunt down equipment. With electronic logs now the law, good luck finding a drayman to haul a container to Birmingham, Alabama, or Jackson, Mississippi.

 
 — Think Tank Leaders —
Donnie Caldwell
Chief Operating Officer,
Ozark Motor Lines

 

Donna Lemm
Executive Vice President,
Sales,
IMC Cos.
   

 

 

 

Think Tank III:
Dallas-Fort Worth

Space is Limited and by Reservation Only

A major consolidation point for freight heading south to Houston, San Antonio, and Mexico, Dallas-Fort Worth is a key junction for freight moving from Southern California on the rails to the Lone Star State. While energy has always been an important part of the trucking market in the region, Dallas-Fort Worth has its share of other commodities flowing through its warehouses. Following the devastation from Hurricane Harvey in 2017, building materials now cycle through Dallas-Fort Worth on their way to Houston. Beef is also a big staple of the region feeding the a 6 million-strong population in Dallas-Fort Worth alone, the fourth most populous metropolitan area in the nation, according to 2016 Census Bureau data. But are truckers having any problems adjusting to the Food Safety Modernization Act enacted in 2017? Finding capacity is also the challenge in this market with flatbed and tank trucks hauling frac sand, steel, and other heavy items to the oilfields. And with the electronic logging device mandate, are the 500-mile trips between New Orleans and Dallas-Fort Worth now two-day affairs?

 
— Think Tank Leaders —
Jeff Blakeman
President,
Blakeman Transportation

 

Mike Eggleton Jr.
Vice President,
Raider Express

 

Brad Elam
Vice President,
Business Development,
Gulf Winds International

 

Harrison Hoof III
Senior Vice President,
Intermodal Cartage Company, Inc.

 

Michael Schwersenska
Director,
Transportation and Logistics,
Brakebush Brothers

 
5:00 — 5:30 PM
 

Inland Markets:
A Roundtable Discussion With Our Think Tank Leaders

The leaders of our six Inland Market Think Tanks will join us on stage to share the transportation problems and logistics solutions discussed and debated during their roundtables. By sharing highlights from each Think Tank, the goal is to move the market closer to identifying solutions to critical problems facing shippers and their partners that can work across regions and the US as a whole.

 
 — Session Chair —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
5:30 — 7:00 PM
 

 Networking Reception

 
 Sponsored By

sponsor


 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.