March 04 - 07, 2018
Long Beach, California

Monday, March 5, 2018

 

 

 
7:00 AM — 6:00 PM
 

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

 Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

 

 
Sponsored By

sponsor 

 


 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

Welcome Remarks

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

 
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Lou Anne Bynum
President,
Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners

 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

Keynote Address

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Wasting no time after being appointed to chairman of board of management of Schenker AG in 2015, Jochen Thewes set three ambitious goals for the world’s third-largest logistics provider. By 2020, the former Kuehne + Nagel executive wants the DB Schenker business unit to attain top positions in target markets, and become the industry’s top employer and an “eco-pioneer.” Aiming to fulfill the first of these goals, Thewes recently told the French business media outlet Les Echos that the company would invest $240 million to become the top road and air logistics player in France, with the aim of toppling Paris-based Geodis. The aggressive approach comes as Thewes envisions a transformation of the ocean shipping market into something “completely different 18 months to two years from now,” following recent carrier consolidation. In his opening keynote speech at TPM 2018, Thewes, who has worked in Brazil, Vietnam, China, Hong Kong, New York, and Singapore among other locations, will discuss his perspective and vision regarding global ocean- and air-based supply chains.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Introduced By —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Keynote Speaker —
Jochen Thewes
CEO and Chairman of the Board of Management,
DB Schenker

 


 
9:45 — 10:15 AM
 

The Economic And Trade Outlook:
A Presentation by IHS Markit Chief Economist Dr. Nariman Behravesh

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

In a welcome change from the past few years, global growth entering 2018 is strong, economic slack is diminishing, and there are early signs that inflation is beginning to rise, IHS Markit Chief Economist Nariman Behravesh said on Jan. 15. Over the past month, IHS Markit revised upwards its world economic growth forecast from 3.2% to 3.3% in 2018 and from 3.1% to 3.2% in 2019, reflecting improved outlooks for the United States, Canada, and China. With robust growth and (gradually) rising inflation, concerns about overheating are also increasing. This presents a new risk, he says. If central banks are seen to be "behind the curve," and might have to tighten more and sooner than financial markets expect, then the damage to confidence and the expansion could be substantial. Given that inflation is still modest (albeit rising), such a scenario seems at least a year or two away. In the US it now appears that, after two quarters of 3%-plus growth, the US economy took a breather at the end of the year, with expected fourth-quarter GDP growth of around 2.5%. However, the forecast for 2018–20 has been revised modestly upwards to reflect inclusion of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act signed into law on Dec. 22, which among other things cuts personal taxes through 2025, allows expensing of equipment through 2026, and reduces the corporate tax rate permanently. In 2017, Behravesh was awarded the Lawrence R. Klein Blue Chip Forecasting Award, one of the oldest and most prestigious awards in economics, presented to the individual or team with the most accurate economic forecast among Blue Chip Economic Indicators' survey participants. In this, his 4th appearance at TPM, Dr. Behravesh will offer his characteristically lucid and plainly spoken economic forecast that has proven very popular with TPM attendees.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Mark Laufer
CEO,
Laufer Group International Ltd.

 

— Introduced by —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
Dr.Nariman Behravesh
Chief Economist,
IHS Markit

 


 
10:15 — 10:45 AM
 

 Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

 
Sponsored By

sponsor 


 
10:45 AM — 12:00 PM
 

Container Shipping Outlook:
Will a Recovery Year For Carriers Carry Over Into 2018?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The first half of 2017 was positive for carriers that benefited from higher spot and contract rates driven by a growing global economy and tight capacity. It led Maersk Group CEO Soren Skou in August to proclaim, "What we see now is probably the strongest fundamentals for container shipping that we've had for quite a while and certainly since 2010." As Hapag-Lloyd CEO Rolf Habben Jansen told the JOC Europe Conference in Hamburg in September, "We think that capacity growth is pretty much coming to a halt, scrapping remains at a high level, and that means we're getting to an era that is likely going to be a little more stable than we have seen in a long, long time." The second half of 2017 has proved less fortuitous for the carriers as spot rates dropped 18 percent between mid-August and mid-September, according to Freightos, and driving spot rates below contract rates, alienating some shippers. The longer-term supply-demand outlook has grown murky with the resumption of mega-ship ordering by Mediterranean Shipping Co. and CMA CGM. As it stands early in the fourth quarter, the market overall continues to recover but not at the rate of early 2017. "Rates are expected to rise again next year, but not at anything like the same margin as this year," Drewry reported in mid-October. In this market outlook session, three speakers will present their perspective on supply, demand, and market fundamentals in the trans-Pacific and globally in 2018.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Neil Barni
Managing Director of CargoSphere,
Now a WiseTech Global Company

 

— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade

 

— Panelists —
Dr. Yin Ming
Deputy Secretary-General,
Shanghai Maritime University

 

Peter Sand
Chief Shipping Analyst,
BIMCO

 

Graham Slack
Chief Economist,
Maersk Group

 


 
12:00 — 12:30 PM
 

TPM Accelerator: Containerized Trade and US Customs — Taking the Temperature

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Moving containerized goods seamlessly into and out of the US requires a commitment from the US government to facilitate trade at ports and borders as an economic priority. Yet that's sadly not the current message coming from the US government. According to Pete Mento, vice president of global trade and managed services for Crane Worldwide Logistics, the trade community is profoundly disappointed. "Things are pretty tense these days between Customs and the trade," he wrote in September. "The environment has slid backward toward a lack of confidence in one another. On our end, we question if ACE — a billion dollars over budget, a decade behind schedule and entirely underwhelming — will ever deliver on any of its promises, or even just work consistently. "(We challenge) anyone to tell us that C-TPAT works or to show any benefit to membership. The Centers for Excellence are understaffed and lack the budget to be effective. And possibly worst of all, we don't seem to be having meaningful conversations anymore. It's gone back to us being dictated to rather than seeking partnerships." And here's the bottom line, he said: "All of my conversations with CBP officials leave me with one simple impression: There will be a renewed enthusiasm for reviews, audits, and enforcement." In this solo "Accelerator" speech at TPM, Mento, an exuberant and well-regarded speaker, will discuss his view of the Customs situation as it relates to containerized trade and where he sees it headed. Prior to joining Crane, Pete was practice leader and principal of Ryan Tax LLC's Customs and Global Trade Practice. While there, he managed the recovery and avoidance of global duties and VAT for importers worldwide. Pete, who previously led the global customs efforts for C.H. Robinson, is a customhouse broker, foreign relations expert and trade academic. He is one of the world's leading experts on international trade policy and supply chain security, and an often-quoted source on the development of the US and global economy and the role trade policy has played.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Introduction
Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and
JOC Events, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit
 
— Featured Speaker —
Pete Mento
Vice President,
Global Trade and Managed Services,
Crane Worldwide Logistics

 


 
12:30 — 2:00 PM
 

 Lunch with Speaker: Creating Value for
   North American Intermodal Shippers

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

Whatever your opinion of Canadian Pacific Railway under the late E. Hunter Harrison, there’s no doubt that he turned the once poorly performing railroad into one able to make dynamic intermodal moves under Keith Creel, who took over as CEO in January 2017. Creel is capitalizing on CP’s firmer footing to transform the railroad into what modern intermodal customers need and demand: an enabler of supply chain value rather than just a line-haul operator. That’s evident in CP’s harnessing of automation at terminals for faster truck turns, speeding up cross-border shipments, and launching services that give US importers and exporters access to the Port of Vancouver, British Columbia. “It’s the total service offering that you take to the marketplace that drives … compelling value-creating conversations,” Creel told investors in October. Realizing shipper demands and competition is only intensifying, Creel will explain how CP is collaborating and embrace technology to serve the modern containerized supply chain, while offering his view of the state of the North American intermodal market and his vision of the future.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 
— Session Introduction —
Marcus Reimann
Senior Vice President-Seafreight North America,
Kuehne + Nagel Inc.

 

 — Introduction
 Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade
 
 
— Featured Speaker —
Keith Creel
President and CEO,
Canadian Pacific Railway

 


 
2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

View from the Top:
A Roundtable Discussion with Industry Leaders

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The industry is changing, but how fast, and what is hype and what really matters? The carriers may consolidate further — some believe more deals are coming — but the bulk of merger-and-acquisition activity is likely done for the moment, and now customers, carriers, and third-party logistics providers are adjusting. Carriers are thinking differently about offering guaranteed services, while 3PLs are trying to leverage technology to create differentiation. Customers have their own needs — reliability, visibility, and competitive costs among them — and those largely haven’t changed. Neither has the likelihood of achieving them, however. With trans-Pacific rates toward the end of 2017 in free fall, with no evidence that consolidation is making any difference, where will carriers find the investment needed to improve service? Is anyone bringing a level of technology to the market, or any other idea for that matter, that can truly drive value. In this session with four industry leaders, Melinda Crane, chief diplomatic correspondent for the German media group DW, will lead an in-depth and highly focused discussion aimed at shedding light on the major issues confronting shippers in 2018 and in the years beyond that.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Greg Iannarelli
Sr. Director,
Business Development & Chief Counsel,
PhilaPort, The Port of Philadelphia

 

— Session Chair —
Dr. Melinda Crane
Chief Correspondent,
Deutsche Welle TV, USA and Germany

 

— Panelists —
Nicolas Sartini
CEO,
APL

 

Tom Behrens-Sorensen
Chairman, CEO,
Behrens-Sorensen Advisory P/S

 

Beth Whited
Executive Vice President and
Chief Marketing Officer,
Union Pacific Railroad

 

Sanne Manders
Chief Operating Officer,
Flexport

 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

 Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

   

 3:30 — 4:30 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Gridlock at the Gates:
The Urgent Need for Extended Gates and Trucker Appointments at North American Ports

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

The import surges caused by mega-ship calls are forcing beneficial cargo owners to take a harder look at truck turns times, and what marine terminals are doing to keep them down and predictable. Terminal operators, truckers, BCOs, and technology providers understand the factors that contribute to gate congestion, and they are implementing measures to eradicate the problems when possible, or at least mitigate the bottlenecks. The Harbor Trucking Association of Southern California has detailed data going back five years that tracks increased truck turn times due to peak-season volume surges, changes in vessel deployments due to carrier alliances and labor disruptions. The HTA also tracks improvements in turn times resulting from slack season drops in container volume, implementation of trucker appointment systems, and formation of neutral chassis pools. Terminal operators are adjusting to the mega-ship cargo surges with process improvements such as container dray-offs and peel-offs, extended gate hours, and trucker appointment systems. Technology providers have developed a number of tools that give truck dispatchers real-time visibility to gate queues and congestion at specific locations within the marine terminals. BCOs have developed their own preparedness programs to guard against interruptions in cargo flow, and to recover from incidents when they occur. The industry has made significant strides in reducing marine terminal gate congestion, but more work remains. This session will analyze the state of gate efficiency at North American ports, and where it needs to go to increase fluidity.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Dave Thomas
Deputy Executive Director,
Maryland Port Administration

 

— Session Chair —
Hugh Morley
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Edward DeNike
President,
SSA Containers

 

Weston LaBar
Founding Partner,
PEAR Strategies,
and CEO,
Harbor Trucking Association 
 
Allen Thomas
Chief Strategy Officer,
Advent Intermodal Solutions

 

Wim Lagaay
Head of North America and Europe Portfolio,
APM Terminals

 

Jeffrey Solomon
Director of Operations,
SG Footwear
   

 
 

 

 

Exports I:
Back on a Growth Track — Analyzing the US Export Outlook

Location: 102, 1st Floor

After declining 3 percent from 2013 to 2016, US containerized exports were on track to grow in 2017. Although the growth has been slight, it’s nonetheless benefited cotton, poultry, lumber, and other shippers as well as railroads, marine terminals, and container lines looking to handle anything other than empties on the US backhaul trade, despite low export rates. Through the first nine months of 2017, containerized exports stood at 9.3 million TEU, up 0.3 percent from the same period a year earlier, according to IHS Markit. That may appear to be scant progress, especially measured against the 5 percent increase US imports posted in the same period, but it reveals positive underlying dynamics. That’s because wastepaper exports, one of the highest volume commodities moving in the westbound trans-Pacific and accounting for more than 6 percent of all US containerized exports, plummeted 11.6 percent in the period, to 1.1 million TEU, after China — the largest destination for recyclables — in August began a major crackdown on the importation of scrap paper as part of a larger environmental initiative. Helping to offset that decline was strong overall growth in lumber products (up 22 percent to more than 530,000 TEU), cotton (up more than 30 percent to nearly 255,000 TEU) and paper/paperboard (up 8 percent to more than 437,000 TEU). Other favorable trends include signs of economic recovery in Brazil and the strengthening of the real, which helped push US export growth to the east coast of South America to 5 percent in the first nine months of 2017, and the emergence of Africa as a US export destination — the continent led all regions over the period with 6.3 percent growth, although on a small base of less than 200,000 TEU, according to IHS Markit data. This session will take a deep dive into the market forces driving growth in US containerized exports and the outlook for 2018 and beyond.

 
— Session Chair —
Edward Zaninelli
President, Griffin Creek Consulting

 

— Featured Speaker —
Paul Bingham
Vice President,
Economic Development Research Group

 

   

 
 

 

 

Technology I:
The Cyber Threat — Developing a Business Continuity Strategy

Location: 103, 1st Floor

On June 27, the shipping world received a rude shock of how vulnerable it is to weaknesses in cybersecurity when Maersk fell victim to the so called NotPetra ransomware attack that crippled its network and took months and millions of dollars to recover from. The attack, of which Maersk was one of thousands of victims, caused the shutdown of several Maersk-owned marine terminals, booking functionality and back-end systems, and required the world's largest container carrier to temporarily revert to the days of manual operations. It possibly cost the carrier 400,000 TEU worth of business, according to analyst Lars Jensen and the cost to its bottom line, as the company revealed in November, was $250 million to 300 million. The attack was mentioned 31 times in the company's third-quarter earnings call on Nov. 7. The attack brought to life the latest and possibly least predictable risk to container supply chains. A shipper can pull cargo from a financially weak carrier and avoid ports vulnerable to longshore labor action. But how can shippers protect their supply chains from the risk of cyberattack when they're perpetrated by shadowy, possibly state-sponsored actors who evolve their methods faster than defenses can keep up with them? In this session, we'll take a close look at this question, bringing in cybersecurity experts to help us better understand the nature of the risk, the likelihood and severity of possible future attacks, and most importantly what shippers can do to mitigate the risk.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

— Session Introduction —
Ashley Craig
Partner,
Venable LLP

 

— Session Chair —
Nicola Good
Executive Editor,
Fairplay, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelist —
Inna Kuznetsova
President and Chief Operating Officer,
INTTRA

 

Jochen Gutschmidt
Head of Global Logistics Procurement,
Nestrade SA

 

Christy Coffey
Executive Vice President, Operations,
Maritime & Port Security Information Sharing
and Analysis Organization
   

 
 

 

 

Cool Cargoes I:
Where is the Global Reefer Market Headed?

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

The fundamental drivers in the global refrigerated shipping market remain strong and the future forecast is bullish. Seaborne refrigerated cargo carried by container ships and specialized reefer operators combined will exceed 134 million metric tons by 2021, according to Drewry. At the same time, container ships will continue to capture market share from specialized reefer operators, the consulting firm says, with container ships’ control of reefer cargo growing to 85 percent of the global reefer market over this three-year period. Yet there are apparent wrinkles in the otherwise rosy outlook. A shortage of reefer containers is pushing rates higher and ratcheting up supply chain risk for perishable shippers whose products are extremely time- and temperature sensitive. Indeed, 2016 marked the first year that demand for reefer containers outpaced supply, Drewry noted, with little relief on the horizon. In this critical “State of the Reefer Industry” session, Thomas Eskesen, founder of Eskesen Advisory, will deliver a comprehensive analysis of the current market indicators and what they portend for perishable shippers, carriers, and the cold chain community at large. Joining Mr. Eskesen to round out the hour-long discussion will be stakeholders representing key areas of the global reefer market who will weigh in with their market perspectives.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 
— Session Introduction —
Hans Bean
VP Trade Development,
North Carolina Ports

 

— Session Chair & Presenter —
Lara L. Sowinski
Editorial Director,
Supply Chain Network,
AC Business Media

  

— Panelists —
Thomas Eskesen
Founder,
Eskesen Advisory

 

Anne-Sophie Zerlang Karlson
Global Head of Reefer Management,
Maersk Line

 

Robert Sappio
CEO,
SeaCube Containers LLC

 

Diogo Lobo
CEO,
NorthPoint Logistics

 

Leo A. Holt
President,
Holt Logistics

 


 4:30 — 5:30 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Longshore Labor:
A Sustainable Peace?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Now it's longshore unions competing for your cargo. US longshore labor unions want your cargo, and they're showing they're willing to compete for it. This is a change. In August, the International Longshore and Warehouse Union on the US West Coast voted overwhelmingly to extended its contract for five years, something it had never done before, in order to send a powerful message to beneficial cargo owners who have been shifting cargo to East and Gulf Coast ports. Worried that its sizable market share gains in recent years could be in jeopardy, the International Longshoremen's Association representing dockworkers on the East and Gulf coasts in December plans to begin discussing with employers the idea of extending its own contract for several years to deliver the same message: convincing BCOs that the East Coast also can guarantee labor peace. Although BCOs want the opportunity to plan their supply chains free from the fear of strikes, work slowdowns or employer lockouts, this year's moves were only a first step toward that goal. Even with the West Coast extension, there is still cause for concern. The ILWU is intensifying a drive to organize supervisors, after an initial win at the APL terminal at Los Angeles, which will affect terminals at Los Angeles-Long Beach and possibly up the coast. As the ships calling US ports get steadily larger, to what degree is longshore labor willing to be supportive? Specifically, what more are the unions willing to do to improve efficiency in the handling of cargo surges of 10,000 or more containers per vessel call? Are they prepared to consistently handle container exchanges of 24,000, as the ILWU did from a Maersk Line vessel call in Los Angeles last fall? This session will lead us through the current dynamics and look at what the future may bring in this critical scenario for US ocean supply chains. 

 
— Panelists —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Joseph Bonney
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

   

 
 

 

 

Exports II:
Exploring Sector-Specific Challenges — Resins, Cotton, Soybeans And Recyclables

Location: 102, 1st Floor

The macroeconomic indicators may be pointing to an improving landscape for US exporters, but it’s not all positive for some commodities. On the growth side, the big story in 2018 and beyond will be synthetic resins, as producers ramp up output at plants along the US Gulf, and resin-packaging facilities sprout up in the mid- and South Atlantic. Overall, US resin exports are expected to double, to 1 million TEU, over the next few years as producers take advantage of low-cost natural gas feedstocks. With Houston handling roughly 40 percent of all resins volume — and growing to an estimated 500,000 TEU by 2020 — the Gulf’s largest container port faces questions about whether it has the capacity and equipment to handle the coming surge. That not only presents opportunities for other export gateways, but raises concerns for other lower-cost exports, such as cotton. With cotton exports approaching 300,000 TEU a year and growing — and much of that moving through the US Gulf — the big question is how the surge in resins will impact container and trucking availability, and transportation costs, for cotton exporters. In anticipation of the surge, cotton shippers and forwarders have begun lining up alternatives, including identifying sources of empty containers at secondary inland distribution hubs near cotton-growing regions. The story for two other primary export sectors — soybeans and wastepaper — centers around China, where environmental and other regulatory initiatives are prompting strategic rethinking. On the former, 2017 got off to a strong start as demand in China surged and political unrest derailed Brazilian shipments. the good news for US soybean exporters soured quickly, however, as China installed new quality rules that took effect on Jan. 1. The new initiative could require additional processing of US product at Chinese ports to remove impurities, raising costs and reducing sales to the world’s largest soybean importer. Finally, wastepaper, the largest segment of US exports at more than 10 million TEU a year, is looking for new markets as new environmental regulations in China led to a nearly 12 percent plunge in outbound US shipments in the first three quarters of 2017. This session, part of a renewed export focus at TPM, will analyze the challenges these four critical US export segments face, and the strategies shippers are taking to address them.

 
— Session Chair —
Edward Zaninelli
President,
Griffin Creek Consulting

 

— Panelists —
Michael Symonanis
Director,
North America Logistics,
Louis Dreyfus

 

Mike Steenhoek
Executive Director,
Soy Transportation Coalition

 

Frank A. Vingerhoets
President,
Katoen Natie USA

 

Tony Chenh
Business Development Account Manager,
West,
merQbiz
   

 
 

 

 

Technology II:
Blockchain — An Example of How it Could Apply to Shipping

Location: 103, 1st Floor

As time progresses, blockchain becomes harder to ignore, even if it's still in its infancy as a technology and business enabler. The idea of a decentralized system of enshrining transactions with the force of legal contracts is so compelling that it's been described, perhaps overenthusiastically, as the most powerful development in technology since the birth of the internet. In transportation and logistics blockchain is much discussed but has yet to make itself felt in a meaningful way. But the knocking on the door is only getting louder. Maesrk and IBM on Jan. 16 announced formation of a new company to commercialize blockchain technology in shipping; The Blockchain in Transport Alliance, or BiTA, was recently formed by technology and transportation executives to create a forum for development of blockchain standards and education for the freight industry. A startup called ShipChain recently raised $30 million to build a blockchain-based logistics platform. And what was billed as the first pilot of paperless bills of lading based on blockchain technology was completed in November by Zim Integrated Shipping, Sparx Logistics, and Wave Ltd. It is the last of these that we will focus on in this TPM session, providing a concrete example of how blockchain has the potential to impact if not transform basic ocean container processes.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Corey Rhodes
Vice President of Sales,
Amber Road

 

— Session Chair —
Daniel James
Product Director,
Markit Commodity Tracker,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
George Goldman
President,
Zim USA

 

Gadi Ruschin
CEO,
Wave Ltd.

 

Bjorn Vang Jensen
Vice President,
Global Logistics,
Electrolux

 

Jason Manganaro
Vice President,
Sales (USA),
Sparx Logistics
   

 
 

 

 

Cool Cargoes II:
What Dry Shippers Can Learn from Reefer Shippers

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

The benefits of a cross-disciplinary approach to supply chain management will serve as the model for this informative panel comprised of reefer BCOs who will share candid insight and valuable best practices related to shipping time- and temperature-sensitive cargoes. Given the unique demands associated with the reefer sector — from real-time tracking and tracing and rigorous compliance standards, to maintaining cold chain integrity from origin to destination — BCOs in this segment are a rich source of practical tips and advice for peers who ship non-perishable goods, but are likewise looking for better supply chain optimization, improved collaboration, non-biased feedback on the latest software and technology tools, and more.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Jamie Overley
CEO of East Coast Warehouse

 

— Session Chair
Thomas Eskesen
Founder,
Eskesen Advisory

 

Panelists
Chris Swartz
Director,
Global Transportation and Logistics Services,
AJC International

 

Chayenne Wiskerke
CEO,
Wiskerke Onions 

 

Michael Dempsey
Vice President,
Container and Port Solutions,
ORBCOMM

 

Franck Kayser
Independent Consultant,
and former Chief Operations Officer,
CMA CGM

 
5:30 — 7:30 PM
 

 Welcome Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

  


 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.