October 09 - 11, 2018
Shenzhen, China

Wednesday, October 10, 2018

 

 

 
7:00 AM — 6:00 PM
 

Registration

Location: Hotel Lobby

 
Sponsored By

sponsor


 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

 Welcome Coffee and Tea

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

Welcome Remarks

Location: Espana Ballroom I

 
Shane Akeroyd
President,
Asia and Global Head of
Account Management,
IHS Markit

 

Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Guest Speaker —
Mr. Yang Hong
Member of Standing Committee of
CPC Shenzhen Municipal Committee,
Party Member of Shenzhen Municipal Government

 


 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

Keynote Address

Location: Espana Ballroom I

Tan Chong Meng is group CEO of PSA International and head of the Senior Management Council of PSA Group, the executive team responsible for making key group-wide decisions. He is responsible for the overall performance of the group and leads strategy and execution functions. Prior to PSA, Tan held various leadership positions with Shell Downstream, part of the Royal Dutch Shell Group, in sales, marketing, trading, refinery operations, customer service, and acquisitions in the US, Europe, China, and Singapore. Tan also has held various positions with Singapore’s Ministry of National Development and is a non-executive director of the board of the National Health System, a board member of IE Singapore, and a member of the Committee of Future Economy of Singapore.In his keynote address, In his Keynote Address at the 2018 TPM Asia Conference, Tan will share his views on the future of shipping, supply chain logistics, trade facilitation, and the potential of new technologies to transform the industry including the use of big data, blockchain and global supply chain platforms such as CALISTATM — a new partnership between PSA and CrimsonLogic/GeTS which serves the needs of the cargo community and logistics service providers.

 
— Speaker Introduction —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit
 
— Keynote Speaker —
Tan Chong Meng
Group CEO,
PSA International

 
9:45 — 11:00 AM
 

The Economic and Containerized Shipping Outlook:
Where Are We Headed?

Location: Espana Ballroom I

China is implementing a comprehensive state-directed overhaul of its manufacturing sector that will have major implications for sourcing and international supply chain operations. Known as the world’s factory, China accounts for approximately 20 percent of global manufacturing, including a third of all automobiles; 40 percent of ships; 80 percent of computers; 90 percent of mobile phones, and half the world’s steel. But government concerns that the sector is “large without being strong” due to lack of internationally competitive companies and products of its own, as well as rising manufacturing costs, underpin a major plan for change. Titled “China Manufacturing 2025” (CM2025), the plan sets ambitious goals for developing 10 key industries. The numbers attached to the initiative are staggering: In total, the Chinese central and local governments have announced hundreds of billions of dollars in funding in the form of subsidies, direct funds, and other channels of support. With goals that include raising the percentage of basic components and basic materials in Chinese-manufactured products to 70 percent from 40 percent previously and nurturing higher-value industries to replace lower-end manufacturing, CM2025 will have significant implications for containerized cargo transportation. In this session, Lance Noble of Gavekal Dragonomics and former head of research at the European Chamber of Commerce in China, will examine the changes CM2025 will bring to China’s manufacturing landscape, including specific plans for the major development of industries such as robotics, semiconductors, new energy vehicles, and advanced rail equipment.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
MJ Dornford
Vice President,
Logistics & Sales,
CAI International

 

— Session Chair —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Philip Damas
Head,
Director Supply Chain Advisors Practice,
Drewry

 

Eric Lin
Executive Director,
Asia Transport Research,
UBS

 

Lance Noble
Senior Thematic Policy Analyst,
Gavekal Dragonomics

 
11:00 — 11:30 AM
 

 Networking Coffee Break

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 
 

 
11:30 AM — 12:30 PM
 

View From the Top:
A Discussion With Industry Leaders

Location: Espana Ballroom I

Container shipping lines had little time to enjoy their newfound profitability going into 2018, and what they did not need was excess capacity and weak rates combining with sharply increasing bunker fuel prices. The optimism that was expressed at the beginning of the year that container shipping was an industry in recovery is long gone, with carriers now clinging to predictions of a better supply-demand balance in the second half and hoping bunker surcharges mitigate fuel price increases. Where will the investment come from to support a shipping industry trying hard to evolve and meet both the rising demands of forwarders leveraging technology to create differentiation, and the growing expectations of shippers seeking improved transparency, visibility and all round customer service? In this session, industry leaders will discuss the major issues confronting shippers in the year ahead.

 
 Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Inna Kuznetsova
President and Chief Operating Officer,
INTTRA

 

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Thomas Knudsen
President,
Global Forwarding,
Toll Group

 

Nicolas Sartini
CEO,
APL

 

John McCauley
Vice President,
Transportation and Logistics,
Cargill

 

Gerry Yim
Chief Executive Officer,
HPH Trust

 
12:30 — 1:30 PM
 

 Networking Lunch

Location: Espana Ballroom II and Barcelona

 
 

 
1:30 — 2:30 PM
 

Intra-Asia:
Analyzing the Changing Dynamics of the World's Largest Container Shipping Trade

Location: Espana Ballroom I

The intra-Asia business is generally tied to two major east–west routes — the trans-Pacific and Asia–Europe — with most regional shipments driven by the production of components assembled in a final Asian country before being shipped to foreign markets. This connectivity with major trades allows carriers to treat intra-Asia routes as loss leaders, which is the only explanation considering freight rates on many routes often don't cover the loading of a ship, let alone the transportation of a container. But within the region, the jewel in Asia’s economic crown is Southeast Asia, where GDP growth is driving trade and keeping ships full and logistics companies busy. Another fillip for Southeast Asia are the US trade tariffs that appear to be accelerating a shift in production out of China. Vietnam has been the main beneficiary, with IHS Markit's PMI showing a significant increase in new orders and international demand in the second quarter of 2018. There are no shortage of challenges facing the intra-Asia trade: Rising volume is putting infrastructure-constrained ports under pressure and causing regular congestion, a series of typhoons battered the region this year, and heavy fog further upset shipping schedules across most of North and East Asia. This session will examine the dynamic intra-Asia trade and offer expert analysis about what to expect over the next year.

 
Sponsored By

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— Introduced by —
Carman Leung
General Manager,
Commercial Department,
Hutchison Ports,
Yantian

 

— Session Chair —
Greg Knowler
Europe Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Gavin Dow
Partner,
Transportation,
Silk Road Associates;
and Chairman,
Transportation & Logistics Committee,
American Chamber of Commerce,
Hong Kong

 

Dan Hoffmann
Managing Director,
Gold Star Line

 

Edoardo Podesta
Managing Director,
Air & Sea Logistics Asia Pacific,
Dachser Far East

 
2:30 — 3:15 PM
 

The Indian Subcontinent and Beyond:
A View of the South Asia Market

Location: Espana Ballroom I

South Asia is one of the most promising regions for economic growth in the world. The region's key markets are improving their capacity for export manufacturing, including investing in sorely needed upgrades to shipping and logistics infrastructure, in the hope of attracting more of the international supply chain operations of beneficial cargo owners. With its huge population and enormous scope for development, India is the source of much of South Asia's potential. IHS Markit expects India's GDP to grow at more than 7 percent a year over the coming half decade, much higher than expected for China, albeit from a much lower base. Many agree the day is approaching when the India Subcontinent dethrones China as the world's primary manufacturing hub. How soon this happens, and whether it happens at all, depends to a large degree on the success of the Indian government's efforts to transform the manufacturing and shipping and logistics sectors, spearheaded by its mammoth "Make in India" and "Sagarmala" initiatives. Other markets in the region, including Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, also are undergoing major upgrades to their logistics infrastructure, supporting increased levels of international sourcing and — in the case of Sri Lanka — a major boost in container shipping business. This session will examine the region's potential as an international manufacturing center, as well as the challenges BCOs that want to increase investment in the region face, with a specific focus on logistics and shipping infrastructure and services in its key markets.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Brian Yeung
Managing Director,
DaChan Bay Terminals

 

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 
3:15 — 3:45 PM
 

 Networking Coffee Break

Location: Espana Ballroom Foyer

 
 Sponsored By

sponsor


 
3:45 — 4:45 PM
 

Asia-Europe Rail: What Rapid Growth and Increasing Congestion Means for BCOs

Location: Espana Ballroom I

t’s s a critical time for the China-Europe rail landbridge. Rapid growth is starting to expose infrastructure shortcomings that are undermining transit time and reliability advantages for BCOs. A total of 6,300 eastbound and westbound block trains traveled between the two continents in the seven years through 2017, with 3,200 trains moving last year alone, according to official Chinese statistics. This growth is continuing in 2018 as second- and third-tier Chinese cities compete to send more trains and reap the associated benefits under policies related to the central government’s Belt and Road initiative. Operators expect between 4,000 and 4,500 trains to travel eastbound and westbound this year, or 20 to 40 percent more than 2017. But with more than 95 percent of all trains on the service still beginning or ending in Germany, border stations on the primary rail corridor into Europe are growing increasingly congested. The result is an increase in average transit times. A shipment from Chongqing city in central/western China to Duisburg, Germany, that took only 11 days three years ago now takes an average of 17. If transit times continue to slide and reliability continues to decline, growth levels almost certainly will drop as BCOs stick with or switch back to shipping by ocean or even air. This panel will analyze growth levels on the landbridge, including which commodities and types of shippers it benefits the most. It will look at the problem areas and service risks and outline what’s needed to resolve them and provide an outlook for the services in terms of infrastructure, service quality, pricing for BCOs, and the eventual elimination of government subsidies.

 
— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Andre Wheeler
CEO,
Wheeler Management Consulting

 
4:45 — 5:15 PM
 

TPM Asia Accelerator:
Clearing the Air in China — an Environmental Impact Study

Location: Espana Ballroom I

In 2015, China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection started to demonstrate its resolve to enforce the country’s environmental regulations as a key part of efforts to tackle serious levels of pollution and inefficient industry across the country. Since then, tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of companies have been shut down, and tougher regulations have been introduced enabling government officials and environmental non-governmental organizations to take legal action against companies violating environmental rules, including public interest lawsuits against multinational companies. The shutting down of factories for months at a time and in many cases permanently has resulted in enormous disruption to supply chain operations of many international companies. The situation is exacerbated by the merging of environmental goals with the goals of the central government to clean up small and inefficient companies as it seeks to reduce overcapacity and upgrade industries. This session will feature Juiia Coym, a Shanghai-based senior analyst specializing in regulatory and political risk at consultant Control Risks, who will analyze the growing impact the environmental crackdown is having on supply chains in China. She will look at current and upcoming developments that will impact international supply chain operations and advise BCOs on what they need to do to respond to this new normal of environmental and compliance enforcement in Chinese manufacturing and industry.

 
— Speaker Introduction —
Turloch Mooney
Senior Editor,
Global Ports,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
Julia Coym
Senior Analyst,
Control Risks

 
5:15 — 6:45 PM
 

 Networking Reception

Location: The Galleon

 
Sponsored By

sponsor


 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.