• TPM23
  • February 26 – March 1, 2023 | Long Beach Convention Center
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Thomas G. Williams

BNSF Railway

Group Vice President-Consumer Products

Tom G. Williams was named group vice president, Consumer Products in July 2017. In this role, Tom is responsible for BNSF's domestic and international intermodal marketing and sales, as well as the automotive business.

Tom previously served as vice president, Industrial Products, since November 2016. In this role, he was responsible for marketing and sales for chemicals, plastics and petroleum products.

Tom joined the former Santa Fe Railway Company in 1993 in Schaumburg, Ill. He held various positions in Intermodal Marketing, Automotive Marketing and Industrial Products Marketing prior to assuming the role of assistant vice president, Intermodal / Automotive Operations in the Service Design and Performance group at BNSF. In February 2014, Tom was promoted to vice president, Industrial Products Sales.

Education

 Bachelor of Science in business finance, Indiana University at Bloomington

 Master of Business Administration, University of Chicago

 Advanced Management Program, Harvard University

Affiliations/Community Involvement

 Transportation Executive Board member – Kelley School of Business, Indiana University

 Southwest Region Trustee – Boys and Girls Clubs of America

 Board of Directors – Intermodal Association of North America

Family/Hobbies

Tom, his wife Sherry and their two children live in Colleyville TX

Sessions With Thomas G. Williams

Monday, 27 February

  • 03:50pm - 04:35pm (PST) / 27/feb/2023 11:50 pm - 28/feb/2023 12:35 am

    Transloading: Re-Engaging Old Strategies

    Since 2020, transloading has grown significantly in popularity among shippers, but much of the new business was about getting freight to distribution centers quickly, a speed-to-market play. Lost in the shuffle were more traditional benefits of transloading: converting four 40-foot containers into three domestic containers, or five 40-footers into four domestic containers. Such a conversation may save a shipper money, but also increase the productivity of a distribution center with more cargo going into each dock door. As supply chains normalize from the frenetic pace of the last two-plus years, how can shippers rethink transloading and reintroduce some of the traditional benefits back into their supply chains? Where does transloading make sense and where does international intermodal have an advantage? This session will feature representatives from companies that are investing in transloading on the East, Gulf, and West coasts who will discuss potential new solutions for shippers.