March 04 - 07, 2018
Long Beach, California

Tuesday, March 6, 2018

 

 

 
7:00 AM — 6:00 PM
 

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


 
7:15 — 8:15 AM
 

Influential Women in Transportation

BY RESERVATION ONLY

Location: Beacon Ballroom, Hyatt Regency Long Beach

Influential Women in Transportation Join us for this special TPM breakfast where executive women in US government will share their professional insights on emerging US policies, priorities and trends in transportation and trade, as well as their personal experiences working in transportation for the US government.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Breakfast Hosts —
Michelle Livingstone
Vice President of Transportation,
The Home Depot

 

Lisa A. Verdon
Former Senior Transportation Advisor,
US Department of State,
Iraq

 

— Featured Speakers —
Rebecca F. Dye
Commissioner,
Federal Maritime Commission

 

Julie Abraham
Director,
Office of International Transportation and Trade,
US Department of Transportation

 
7:30 — 8:30 AM
 

 Networking Breakfast

Location: 1st Floor

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

   


 
8:30 — 8:45 AM
 

Welcoming Remarks and LOG-NET E-Commerce Excellence Award

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

LOG-NET's Electronic Commerce Excellence award has consistently reinforced the partnership between carriers and their customers and the fundamental importance of data quality in that relationship. Digitalization has made data management and data quality foundational elements of successful global supply chains. Whether the data is coming from smartphones, web forms, Internet of Things devices or EDI, it needs to be complete, timely, and accurate. Data quality is critical, considering the consumers of this information now range from import and logistics specialist to business intelligence and machine learning platforms that demand ever more granular information. For the past 15 years, LOG-NET CEO John Motley has presented the LOG-NET E-Commerce Excellence award. The award recognizes the efforts of the international carrier community and its outstanding daily performance with LOG-NET's Trading Partner and Data Quality teams.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

   

— Introduced By —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
John Motley
CEO,
Log-Net

 


 
8:45 — 9:00 AM
 

JOC Lifetime Achievement Award:
Honoring Voxx International's Pat Moffett

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

We are delighted to recognize Pat Moffett upon his retirement as Vice President for International Logistics & Compliance at Voxx International Corp. Few shippers both have the confidence of their organizations to publicly share their knowledge, and are consistently willing to do so; Pat has these qualities, and the industry has benefited greatly over the years as Pat has appeared on numerous JOC event panels and been quoted in many articles in the JOC and other industry media. The industry has further benefited from the Long Island Import-Export Association which Pat has served as Founder and Chairman since 1982. Upon his retirement from Voxx, Pat is not slowing down. He is the executive producer of a feature length film to be released this year based on his 2008 book, Ice Cream in the Cupboard, a memoir of his experiences caring for his wife Carmen who contracted early onset Alzheimer’s at the age of 53. This will be a sincere Thank You to Pat Moffett for an extraordinary logistics industry career.

 
— Award Presented By —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit
and
John F. Reinhart
CEO and Executive Director,
Port of Virginia

 

— Honoree —
Pat Moffett
Vice President,
International Logistics,
VOXX International

 
9:00 — 9:45 AM
 

One-On-One:
A Conversation with Ocean Network Express CEO Jeremy Nixon

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

In July Jeremy Nixon became the CEO of One Network Express, or ONE, the new global carrier created from the merger of the liner businesses NYK Line, MOL, and “K” Line, which will begin operating as a unified business in early 2018. He previously served as CEO of NYK after a long, distinguished career in which he held other executive roles at NYK, Maersk Line and P&O Nedlloyd. Pledging to provide “the world’s highest level of service,” ONE will operate approximately 240 vessels, including 31 ultra-large container ships of up to 20,000 TEUs. At the TPM Asia Conference in October, Nixon described ONE as a company that will be “big enough to survive but still small enough to care. We want to be very customer-centric, with very close relationships with the customers, and with a clear value proposition.” He added that in creating ONE out of the three legacy Japanese carriers, “What we wanted to do is start something completely new, have a clean piece of paper which said, if you were starting up a new liner company today, fit for purpose for the 21st century. how would you set it up?” In this one-on-one conversation, Nixon will discuss his views of the market, how he sees it evolving, the role he envisions ONE will play, and how it will be differentiated in the newly consolidated industry.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Paul DuVoisin
Vice President,
Commercial,
Halifax Port Authority

 

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
Jeremy Nixon
CEO,
Ocean Network Express

 


 
9:45 — 10:45 AM
 

Enforceable Contracts:
Where the Industry Needs to Go

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

If the container shipping industry is to ever enter the modern age and begin creating value in the supply chain, it must get beyond the current lackadaisical attitude regarding enforceability of contracts. The point of a contract is that it’s a signed, legally binding document that commits both sides to perform in accordance with the stated terms. When either side can walk away with impunity from the agreement, it undermines the integrity of the business and discourages investment and other business activity built upon the premise of a contract representing a bona-fide relationship. That explains container shipping today where shippers, carriers and NVOs all have been guilty of walking away from contracted commitments when market forces make that convenient. For an important industry that the world relies upon to facilitate global trade, this is an antiquated, even shameful way of conducting business. It won’t change by carriers imposing no-show fees on customers, or carriers paying a penalty for failing to load cargo delivered to the pier. Rather, change must be cultural, encouraged by example and stressed by industry leaders as a necessary transition the industry must undergo. In this discussion led by Hapag-Lloyd CEO Rolf Habben-Jansen, major industry participants will discuss why enforceable contracts are critical for the industry to adapt worldwide.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
John Hextall
Chief Executive Officer,
De-Well Group

 

— Session Chair & Presenter —
Rolf Habben Jansen
CEO,
Hapag-Lloyd AG

 

— Panelists —
James Miller
Global Category Procurement Manager,
Caterpillar

 

Michael Burns
Vice President,
Global Transportation and
Omnichannel Logistics,
Big Lots Stores 

 

Steen Christensen
President, US,
Hellmann Worldwide Logistics

 

Paolo Montrone
Senior Vice President,
Global Head of Trade,
Kuehne + Nagel

 

Michelle Livingstone
Vice President of Transportation,
The Home Depot

 
10:45 — 11:15 AM
 

 Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


 
11:15 AM — 12:15 PM
 

Want Good Service? Spend Time with Your Carrier and Forwarder!

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

With the market volatile and price indices and online marketplaces proliferating, the industry is officially obsessed with freight rates. With ships and containers all the same except the color, it’s a commoditized market where price is the only remaining differentiator, right? Wrong. Come on, people, what is most important to companies that rely on container shipping isn’t price but rather goods actually getting delivered so they can be sold to whoever your customer may be. A low rate doesn’t achieve that. What does achieve it, consistently, and reliably, is the carrier and forwarder being just as invested in your success as you are. An impersonal, hands-off and price-dominated relationship driven frequently by a procurement mindset will almost guarantee that such a commitment isn’t there. That makes a mockery of your low rate when business opportunities get lost and the logistics team takes the blame. It may sound quaint, but success means people, trust, and a commitment to deliver on promises. It’s not about the freight rate anymore. In fact, the business relationship will deliver your desired freight rate by ensuring you are kept competitive with the market. This is a relationships business, not a freight rate business. This panel will explore.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Mike Erickson
President,
AFMS

 

— Session Chair & Presenter —
Chas Deller
Consultant,
Drewry Supply Chain Advisor

 

— Panelists —
Mette Karapetian
Vice President,
Global Accounts-North America,
Shipco Transport Inc.

 

David J. Arsenault
Chief Strategy Officer,
Direct ChassisLink Inc.

 

Andrew Gillespie
Director,
Global Logistics,
Ansell

 

Arthur Bredehoft
Director,
Key Account Sales,
Safmarine

 

Mathieu Friedberg
Sr. Vice President,
Commercial and Agency Network,
CMA CGM

 

 


 
12:15 — 12:45 PM
 

TPM Accelerator:
The Future of Trucking and What it Means for Shippers

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

For a while, many freight transport startups were calling themselves (or were labeled by others) the “Uber for Freight.” Now Uber itself can claim to be the official “Uber for Freight.” The company that took ride hailing to the masses entered the US trucking market in 2017, connecting shippers to an untapped pool of largely small and independent fleets, offering shippers access to capacity that previously had been largely unreachable. This is especially timely in the tightest US trucking market in years. Shippers tapping Uber Freight are able to procure trucking through traditional TMS systems and other means. Uber Freight begins to resemble the ubiquitous ride-hailing app when in the hands of a driver, who can identify loads and get paid using a highly user-friendly tool. In this highly anticipated presentation, Lior Ron, the head of Uber Freight and co-founder of the self-driving truck company, Otto, which is now part of Uber Advanced Technologies Group, will discuss Uber Freight's vision for the digital freight marketplace and why it’s important for shippers in today’s challenging trucking market.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Fred Gilbert
VP,
Strategy & Marketing,
Performance Team

 

— Session Chair —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker—
Lior Ron
Senior Director,
Uber Freight

 


 
12:45 — 2:00 PM
 

 Networking Lunch

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Regency & Beacon Ballrooms

 
 

 


 2:00 — 3:00 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Innovation Jam:
What Problems Can Technology Really Solve?

First of a Two-Part Track

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Technology is all well and good, but what problems can it actually solve? That remains the disconnect between the hype and the reality of the digital revolution as it relates to transportation and logistics. Despite hundreds of millions of dollars invested in startups — not to mention massive technology investments by legacy players — basic problems that shippers experience every day remain unsolved. The question, then, is whether technology can solve them. The JOC editorial team set out to answer that by reaching out to beneficial cargo owners about their most severe supply chain challenges, and inviting technology providers and others to propose how they would solve them. The result was nearly 80 proposed solutions to 17 of the most severe BCO pain points, proposals that an ad hoc committee of BCOs then reviewed and ultimately decided which ideas it wanted to see presented at TPM. The result: Eight technology providers will present their proposed solutions to pain points that range from poor supply chain visibility, exception/contingency management, gate efficiency, rolling of cargo, and variability in ocean carrier schedules. Attendees will have the opportunity to vote on the solution that most convincingly addresses the pain point it addresses, with the winner announced at the end of the jam. Moderating the sessions will be Brian Laung Aoaeh, CFA, a partner at Particle Ventures, a New York-based seed-stage venture fund that invests in technology startups with a focus on supply chain, and who founded the rapidly growing New York Supply Chain Meetup. Brian and the team at Particle believe the greatest technological shift of our time is happening at the intersection of data and heavy industry, making him an ideal moderator of the TPM Innovation Jam.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
John Golob
CEO,
Lanetix

 

— Session Chair —
Brian Laung Aoaeh
CFA,
Partner,
Particle Ventures

 

— Panelists —
Adam Compain
CEO,
ClearMetal

 

Zvi Schreiber
CEO,
Freightos

 

John Motley
CEO,
Log-Net

 

Robin Jaacks
Vice President,
Sales Operations,
Ocean Insights
   

 
 

 

 

Communicating Internally:
Best Practices in Messaging to the C-Level and to Internal Stakeholders

Location: 102, 1st Floor

When things go wrong in shipping, the logistics teams can find themselves in the crosshairs of internal colleagues and/or senior management looking for someone to blame. Unfortunately, heads can roll over factors that are difficult to anticipate and can't be prevented. When things go right, it's taken for granted. On the positive side, logistics teams can provide crucial support for company objectives such as speed to market, cost reduction and reducing work capital. Effective logistics teams can effectively and creatively support company objectives while mitigating the danger of unnecessarily taking the blame for disruption. Being proactive in communicating potential issues to internal colleagues and seeking opportunities to create credibility are ways that best-in-class logistics teams pursue these objectives. This session will discuss best practices in internal communication, relationship building and messaging.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Monica Truelsch
Director Product Management,
Infor (US), Inc.,
GT Nexus Commerce Network

 

— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
William Schmitz
Director of Global Transportation,
Stanley Black & Decker

 

David Torma
Vice President,
Global Supply Chain and Logistics,
Claire's Stores

 

Klaus Schnede
Manager,
North American Marine Category,
Eastman Chemical

 

Joshua C. Bowen
Regional Head of Ocean Freight, Americas,
Panalpina
   

 
 

 

 

Air Cargo Market Outlook:
For Shippers, the Squeeze is On

Location: 103, 1st Floor

Approximately 50 percent of global air freight volume is a result of emergency shipments that would have moved by ocean if all had gone well at the production line, the warehouse, or the retail store. But even as the air cargo industry enjoys growth in volume that it hasn’t seen in years, significant challenges are developing on two fronts that threaten to upset shipper requirements. In an environment where demand is greater than supply, tight space constraints can make it difficult for shippers to secure capacity on short notice, especially during peak shipping periods. Compounding the situation are mounting slot restrictions at global hub airports that limit the movements of freighter aircraft and force them to smaller airports that may have less developed supply chain facilities and connections. As of the third quarter of 2017, these dynamics were playing out amid the strongest year for air cargo yields and volumes in years. Through the first nine months of the year, global air freight demand was up more than 10 percent, according to the International Air Transport Association, despite September’s 9.2 percent increase being the slowest growth in five months. What impact will this have on shippers that need to shift cargo at short notice? Will it force shippers to reconfigure their supply chains to avoid peak periods, and will it make it more difficult for forwarders to secure enough block space on airlines for their customers? This session will analyze the near- and long-term outlook for air freight, and give shippers a broad view of the market and how it will impact their supply chain planning.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor 

 

— Session Introduction —
Mike Piza
Sr VP, Partner,
Apex Global Logistics

 

— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade
 
— Panelists —
Glyn Hughes
Global Head of Cargo,
International Air Transport Association

 

Sanne Manders
Chief Operating Officer,
Flexport

 

Claudia Andersen
Import/Export Manager,
Enterprise Logistics,
1-800-Flowers.com
   

 
 

 

 

Asia I:
A Changing China and What it Means For Importers and Exporters

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

Despite the growing market share of China’s manufacturing competitors as costs rise and China moves away from low-value, high-polluting production, China will remain the predominant source for most companies manufacturing their products in Asia. But a new set of challenges are emerging as the country tries to climb the value chain: Factories and suppliers that aren’t compliant with strict environmental laws face closure — tens of thousands had been shut down as of the fall of 2017 — and manufacturers of foreign products increasingly are running afoul of constantly evolving regulations in Europe and the US. As much as 12 percent of US-bound Chinese products tested by quality-control and compliance service provider Asia Inspection in the third quarter of 2017 were found to contain excessive amounts of lead, cadmium, and other heavy metals, while 2 to 5 percent of products intended for the European Union contained lead that was above permissible levels. Are beneficial cargo owners rethinking their China sourcing strategies, and are there any better options available? Will compliance issues accelerate a move toward near-shoring? What does China’s crackdown on environmentally sensitive products such as wastepaper and other scrap materials mean for US and other exporters? This session will dive into these critical and evolving international trade dynamics.

 
— Session Chair —
Greg Knowler
Europe Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelist —
Tom Behrens-Sorensen
Chairman, CEO,
Behrens-Sorensen Advisory P/S

 

Mark Reiter
Vice President,
Government Relations,
Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries

 
3:00 — 3:30 PM
 

 Networking Break

Location: 1st Floor

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


 3:30 — 4:30 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Innovation Jam:
What Problems Can Technology Really Solve?

Second of a Two-Part Track

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Technology is all well and good, but what problems can it actually solve? That remains the disconnect between the hype and the reality of the technology revolution as it relates to transportation and logistics. Despite the hundreds of millions of dollars invested in startups, not to mention massive technology investments by legacy players, basic problems that shippers experience every day remain unsolved. The question, then, is whether technology solve them. The JOC team is in the process of collecting dozens of pain points from beneficial cargo owners and through surveys that will cull the list to roughly 10 of the most severe choke points experienced today. We’ll then invite technology companies and other vendors to propose how they would solve those problems, before going back to BCOs, who would decide which ideas they want to see presented at TPM. We’ll devote two technology innovation sessions on the program to hearing those presentations that BCOs have voted to hear, which as a group will reveal the degree to which technology is capable of solving today’s most vexing problems.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Todd Ericksrud
President and CEO,
MatchBack Systems

 

— Session Chair —
Brian Laung Aoaeh
CFA,
Partner,
Particle Ventures

  

— Panelists —
Gordon Downes
CEO,
New York Shipping Exchange

 

Karim Jumma
Interim Chief Product Officer,
INTTRA

 

Sumitha Sampath
Vice President of Operations,
XVELA

 

Vladimir Pshonyak
Founder and CEO,
Pier Trucker
   

 
 

 

 

Are We Really Still Talking About Chassis?

Location: 102, 1st Floor

Unfortunately, yes. The reason is that, although carriers have largely withdrawn from chassis ownership, they still indirectly provide them to many BCOs by subsidizing their use within service contracts. Whether carriers are to blame for giving in to BCOs’ demands, or BCOs are to blame for demanding them, or this is just a reality of a highly competitive market, the result is what it is: The entire container supply chain suffers from inconsistent chassis availability, an aging fleet and increasing costs for chassis rentals —a full decade after carriers began withdrawing from providing chassis in the US. Something needs to change. Truckers, the most fragile segment of the supply chain, suffer the most as drivers continue to waste valuable pickup and dropoff time because of the lack of interoperable pools at locations such as New York-New Jersey, which still can’t reach agreement with port stakeholders on establishing a gray chassis pool at the largest East Coast port. Pressure on truckers affects BCOs as much as it does carriers and NVOs. Truckers end up paying a 50 percent premium or more for chassis designated by the ocean carrier compared to what it costs for truckers to use their own chassis. Most industry sources agree that the fix should start with ocean carriers finally getting out of the chassis business, but will that happen? “The fact that the pool fell apart in New York and New Jersey is very unfortunate,” James Newsome, president and CEO of the South Carolina Ports Authority, said at the JOC Container Trade Europe conference in Hamburg in September. “There is no other way to operate today without a working chassis pool. The ports that don’t have a well-working chassis pool are going to struggle.”

 
— Session Chair —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Richard J. Craig
President and CEO,
MOL (America) Inc.

 

Dave Manning
President, TCW Inc.,
and President and Chairman,
North American Chassis Pool Cooperative

 

Greg Moore
Executive Vice President,
FlexiVan
   

 
 

 

 

Workshop:
The view of the container shipping market from the Shanghai International Shipping Institute

Location: 103, 1st Floor

Where is the container market headed in 2018 and beyond in the trans-Pacific and globally? Industry realities are much changed from just a few years ago. Over the past two years, seven east-west carriers exited the market through merger, acquisition, or bankruptcy, and the global economy is expanding in unison for the first time since the 2008-2009 financial crisis. That's led the idle fleet to shrink to practically nothing in early 2018, according to Alphaliner. What does this mean for supply and demand over the coming year? In this in-depth presentation, we will hear from Dr. Yin Ming, an articulate and accomplished maritime economist who serves as deputy secretary-general of the Shanghai International Shipping Institute and who is also a professor of Shanghai Maritime University, whose research covers the theory, policy, and business of international shipping, including the container sector.

 
— Introduced by —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade
 
— Workshop Leader —
Dr. Yin Ming
Deputy Secretary-General,
Shanghai International Shipping Institute,
Shanghai Maritime University
   

 
 

 

 

Asia II:
South Asia’s Emerging Markets — Are They Ready For Prime Time?

Location: 104B, 1st Floor

South Asia is one of the most promising regions for economic growth in the world. The region’s key markets are improving their capacity for export manufacturing, including investing in sorely needed upgrades to shipping and logistics infrastructure, in the hope of attracting more of the international supply chain operations of beneficial cargo owners. With its huge population and enormous scope for development, India is the source of much of South Asia’s potential. IHS Markit expects India’s GDP to grow at more than 7 percent per year over the coming half decade, much higher than expected for China, albeit from a much lower base. Many agree the day is approaching when the India Subcontinent dethrones China as the world’s primary manufacturing hub. How soon this happens, and whether it happens at all, depends to a large degree on the success of the Indian government’s efforts to transform the manufacturing and shipping and logistics sectors, spearheaded by its mammoth “Make in India” and “Sagarmala” initiatives. Other markets in the region, including Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Pakistan, also are undergoing major upgrades to their logistics infrastructure, supporting increased levels of international sourcing and — in the case of Sri Lanka — a major boost in container shipping business. This one-on-one discussion with Dr. Parakrama Dissanayake, chairman of the Sri Lanka Ports Authority and one of South Asia’s pre-eminent shipping professionals, will examine the region’s potential as an international manufacturing center, as well as the challenges BCOs that want to increase investment in the region face, with a specific focus on logistics and shipping infrastructure and services in its key markets.

 
— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
Dr. Parakrama Dissanayake
Chairman,
Sri Lanka Ports Authority

 4:30 — 5:30 PM
 

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

 
 
         
 

 

 

Industrial Real Estate:
Will Supply Keep Pace with Surging Demand?

Location: Grand Ballroom, 2nd Floor

Customer activity in the third quarter of 2017 was at the highest level since 2014, vacancy rates were 4.6 percent — the lowest that industrial real estate firm CBRE has seen in the decades it’s tracked these rates — and rental prices increased 6.6 percent nationwide. Demand for distribution space was broad-based, with the e-commerce fulfillment, retail, transportation, and wholesale sectors all performing well. Although industrial developers generally expect 2018 to be a repeat of 2017, they note that total absorption lagged new deliveries for the first time in seven years during the second quarter of 2017, indicating the post-recession market may be starting to mature. Still, demand for industrial space in seaport-dependent coastal markets and major inland distribution hubs remains strong. Consumers’ shift to e-commerce is fueling particularly strong demand for distribution centers located near end-users. CBRE estimates that each $1 billion in additional e-commerce sales equates to at least 1.25 million square feet of distribution space, “and we think that’s a conservative number,” David Egan, head of CBRE’s industrial research in the Americas, said at the JOC Inland Distribution Conference in November. Where are retailers and other large beneficial cargo owners looking to build new distribution facilities, and what types of structures are they building? Is the groundbreaking for the first multi-story distribution facility in the US near the Port of Seattle a harbinger for other locations? How does e-commerce fulfillment fit into the picture, where are last-mile facilities being built, and how does e-commerce feed off of containerized imports from Asia? What impact is the Panama Canal expansion and resins boom in the Gulf having on industrial property? A panel of industrial real estate experts will tell us where the smart money is going in the coming year.

 
 — Session Chair —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Adam Mullen
Senior Managing Director,
Americas Leader, CBRE

 

Michael P. Murphy
Chief Development Officer,
CenterPoint Properties

 

Chris Caton
Senior Vice President,
Research,
Prologis
   

 
 

 

 

Trucking Outlook:
What Does Much Tighter Capacity Mean for Shippers?

Location: 102, First Floor

Beginning in mid-2017, the US trucking market took a dramatic turn toward tightness of capacity and higher pricing, as the steady economic expansion picked up steam, three major hurricanes drove up demand, and the industry continued to struggle to find and retain drivers. All this occurred before the mandate requiring electronic logging devices in all commercial trucks arrived in December, further stressing capacity. In 2004, the implementation of new federal hours-of-service rules for truckers drained 3 to 4 percent of national capacity, and the ELD mandate is expected to have a similar — or even more severe — effect, exacerbating what had emerged by November as the tightest US domestic market in years. Truckers are preparing shippers for double-digit price increases in 2018, and even intermodal rates experienced a turnaround and were higher in the third quarter. Consulting firm FTR Associates recently estimated that US trucking is operating at an extremely tight 95 percent of capacity. And Jeff Tucker, president and CEO of freight broker Tucker Company Worldwide in the fall said that “trucks are harder to find and more expensive than ever.” This session will assess the market outlook for trucking, including drayage, into 2018 and 2019, and how shippers should plan to adjust.

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 

— Session Introduction —
Jason Hilsenbeck
President,
Drayage.com

 

— Session Chair —
William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor,
Trucking and Domestic Transportation,
JOC, Maritime & Trade, IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Lee Klaskow
Senior Analyst,
Transportation and Logistics,
Bloomberg Intelligence

 

Geoffrey Muessig
Executive Vice President and
Chief Marketing Officer,
Pitt Ohio

 

Jeff Tucker
CEO,
Tucker Company Worldwide

 

John Janson
Director,
Global Logistics,
SanMar

 

   

 
 

 

 

The Automotive Supply Chain:
Gearing for Major Change

Location: 103, First Floor

Ocean transit reliability deterioration, port congestion, and a lack of shipment visibility affects all types of beneficial cargo owners, but the forces are particularly dangerous to time-sensitive auto parts shippers. At nearly 1 million TEU a year, auto parts imports are a critical commodity for ocean carriers, freight forwarders, and US ports including Los Angeles, Long Beach, Charleston, Savannah, and New York-New Jersey. But immense challenges — and potentially disruptive ones — loom, including the impact of electric and autonomous vehicles, China’s environmentally driven factory shutdowns, and regulatory initiatives in the US and abroad. In this special forum, auto parts shippers, transportation providers, and consultants will discuss how importers can mitigate these disruptive pressures. Auto parts shippers will learn how to better prepare for the peak season and Chinese New Year so their cargo doesn’t miss a sailing. Discussion also will include strategic planning to ensure parts providers’ products are coded properly for the Harmonized Tariff Schedule, and how to ensure that their logistics departments provide parts when they’re needed while keeping inventories low without risking stockouts.

 
— Session Chair —
Mark Szakonyi
Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade
 

 

— Panelists —
Steve Hughes
President and CEO,
HCS International

 

Thomas K. Beer
CEO,
SSF Imported Auto Parts

 

Lawrence Burns
Senior Vice President,
Trade and Sales,
Hyundai Merchant Marine

 

   

 
 

 

 

The Day of Reckoning Approaches:
Environmental Mandates on Shipping

Location: 104B, First Floor

The day is fast approaching when global environmental mandates will meaningfully affect containerized supply chains. The first will hit on Jan. 1, 2020, when container ships and other deep-sea vessels will be subject to 0.5 percent cap on the sulfur content of marine fuel. To comply, ships will need to burn low-sulfur fuel at a potentially significantly higher cost — in mid-2017, compliant low-sulfur fuel was 50 percent more expensive than residual bunkers currently in use, and as demand for low-sulfur fuel grows after 2020, the differential could widen. As an alternative, shipowners could install so-called scrubbers to remove sulfur from residual fuels, at a cost of approximately $5 million to $15 million per ship. Either way, the mandate likely will add significant new costs to shipowners, which will pass them along to customers or possibly force weaker players out of business. The larger issue whose impact is still undetermined is carbon dioxide emissions. Shipping wasn’t included in the landmark 2016 Paris climate agreement, with the International Maritime Organization tasked with determining how shipping globally will reduce CO2 emissions. The industry believes the IMO is the only body capable of implementing a global mandate versus the nightmare scenario of a patchwork of regional or national rules that could cripple global trade. Pressure is growing on shipping to contribute to the global ambition of the below-2-Celsius future as agreed to in the Paris accord. The IMO has committed to getting a strategy in place beginning in 2023 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions for the industry. 2018 could see big decisions on how the IMO will achieve this goal.

 
— Session Chair —
John Gallagher
Senior Editor,
Safety & Regulation,
Maritime and Trade,
IHS Fairplay

 

— Panelists —
Bryan Wood-Thomas
Vice President,
World Shipping Council

 

Franck Kayser
Independent Consultant,
and former Chief Operations Officer,
CMA CGM

 


 
5:30 — 7:30 PM
 

 Networking Reception

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Pool Deck

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


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