March 04 - 07, 2018
Long Beach, California

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

 

 

 
8:00 — 11:00 AM
 

Registration

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Lobby

 

 
Sponsored By

sponsor

 


 
8:30 — 9:00 AM
 

 Networking Breakfast

Location: 104 Foyer

 
 

 

  Shipper Case Studies

 
9:00 — 10:00 AM
 

Case Study:
How Coordination by Ports Can Benefit BCO Supply Chains

Location: 104B

It was BCO supply chains that were the focus when the Georgia Ports Authority and the Port of Virginia in February 2017 filed their East Coast Gateway Terminal Agreement with the FMC. By sharing best practices and coordinating on vessel berthing windows, the two ports aimed to further enhance the value for BCOs and forwarders in using the two mid- and south Atlantic gateways. In this TPM case study, the executive directors of the two ports, along with beneficial cargo owners and other stakeholders, will discuss this unique port partnership and highlight the potential supply chain advantages the arrangement will offer for BCOs using both ports in the coming years. Inter-port discussions have included best practices, rail expansion, equipment purchases, safety, and training. The aim of the agreement is to provide superior logistics for BCOs supplying major population centers through US East Coast ports.

 
— Session Chair —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Griffith V. Lynch
Executive Director,
Georgia Ports Authority

 

John F. Reinhart
CEO and Executive Director,
Port of Virginia

 

Marlon Jones
Manager,
International Transportation,
International Paper

 

William F. Rooney
Vice President,
Strategic Development,
Kuehne + Nagel

 
9:00 — 10:00 AM
 

Case Study:
Bringing Stability to an Unstable and Unreliable Chassis Market

Location: 104C

In an operating environment that increasingly seeks improved visibility and relies more on data to better manage cargo flows, American Intermodal Management, led by former APL CEO Ron Widdows, has created a new model in the chassis space. AIM is an asset-owning and -leasing business that integrates technology and an array of sensors to provide real-time visibility into chassis movement and the data and analytics that result from it. The approach — a combination of improved visibility and insights that come from the data, as well as the ability to link container and chassis, and other data elements seamlessly — offers beneficial cargo owners, non-vessel-operating common carriers, third-party logistics providers, motor carriers, and other chassis users increasing stability in an otherwise information-starved and unreliable chassis space. In this case study, Widdows and AIM co-founder (and former APL operations chief) Nathaniel Seeds, together with users of the service will provide a review of the company’s capabilities, how the integration of technology is being used to bring asset management and reliability to a higher level, and how their customers are leveraging data, and employing AIM’s capabilities to augment the management of their supply chain/last mile. Joining Widdows and Seeds in providing perspective will be representatives from a cross-section of AIM customers, including BCOs, NVOs, 3PLs, and motor carriers.

 
— Session Chairs —
Ronald D. Widdows
Executive Chairman,
American Intermodal Management, LLC,
& Chairman,
World Shipping Council

 

Nathaniel Seeds
CEO,
American Intermodal Management

 

— Panelists —
Richard J. Craig
President and CEO,
MOL (America) Inc.

 

Cliff Katab
President,
Performance Team

 

Jonathan Rosenthal
CEO,
Saybrook Management

 
10:00 — 10:30 AM
 

 Networking Coffee Break

Location: 104 Foyer

 
 

 
10:00 AM — 12:30 PM
 

Technology Forum:
Preparing The Port of Los Angeles-GE Transportation Information Portal for Prime Time

Location: Hyatt Regency Long Beach, Beacon Ballroom

Technology providers offer dozens of products to digitize supply chain functions, potentially relieving BCOs, carriers and freight intermediaries from the burden of transmitting multiple copies of paper documents. The digital products provide cargo booking and visibility, transportation management solutions, processing of Customs documentation, inventory management, shipment arrival forecasting, and enhanced asset utilization. The shipment information needed to make these decisions is available two to three weeks before the vessel reaches a US port, but because so many international relationships are siloed, much of the data isn’t shared among supply chain partners until the cargo is discharged from the vessel at a US port. The Port of Los Angeles and GE Transportation have developed an information portal that they tested in 2017 at a marine terminal, with noticeable success, and the portal will expand portwide this year. Could this be the single, secure port information portal the industry is looking for to shorten the international supply chain and slash logistics costs? How will dozens of existing technology products plug into this so-called system of systems? In a series of structured discussions focusing on cargo visibility, electronic communication, forecasting, and inventory management, representatives of the port, GE Transportation and technology companies will update beneficial cargo owners on what to expect as the port information portal is prepared for prime time.

 
— Session Chair —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Gene Seroka
Executive Director, Port of Los Angeles

 

Jennifer Schopfer
Vice President,
Transport Logistics,
GE Transportation Digital Solutions

 

Deborah Ryan
Vice President,
Global Transportation and Logistics,
Ascena Retail Group

 

Weston LaBar
Founding Partner,
PEAR Strategies,
and Executive Director,
Harbor Trucking Association

 

Tommy Barnes
President,
Project44

 

Dr. Noel Hacegaba
Managing Director,
Commercial Operations,
and Chief Commercial Officer,
Port of Long Beach

 

Shankar Sengupta
Vice President,
Engineering and Transport Logistics,
GE Transportation

 

James Swanston
Founder and CEO,
Voyage Control

 
10:30 — 11:30 AM
 

Case Study:
Omni-Channel & The Logistics-Centric Value Proposition

Location: 104B

Lakeshore Learning Materials, a Southern California-based maker of educational materials that imports 2,200 FEUs from Asia annually supplemented by airfreight, combines its own assets with the capabilities of the global logistics community into a logistics value proposition that it feels is right for its business. The company works with nearly 30 logistics-related companies — including shipping lines, freight forwarders, truckers, brokers, and white-glove specialists — on purchase order management, buyer’s consolidation, transloading, domestic intermodal, and other services. Lakeshore is an omnichannel organization with 60 retail stores, online sales, catalog sales, direct sales (to school districts), and even exports. In 2016, it decided to complement its existing 1 million square feet of company-owned warehouses in Carson, California, with a new, 100 percent company-owned distribution center facility in Midway, Kentucky. The decision to invest in and operate the facility itself bucks conventional thinking and the long-term trend toward the outsourcing of logistics services. In what will be a thought-provoking case study, Dan L. Gardner, Lakeshore’s vice president of supply chain, will discuss the company’s strategy.

 
— Introduced by —
Chris Brooks
Executive Editor,
The Journal of Commerce and JOC Events,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Speaker —
Dan L. Gardner
Vice President,
Supply Chain,
Lakeshore Learning Materials

 


 
10:30 — 11:30 AM
 

Case Study:
Cutting Off the Flow of Counterfeit Goods

Location: 104C

Walk the streets of any big city, and you see them: fake Gucci handbags and Rolex watches. But counterfeits aren't just about handbags and watches. There are fake medicines, fake shampoos and deodorants, razor blades and detergents What else have you consumed that you thought was real but was actually made by criminals without any quality control? Even your ships might contain fake ball bearings. How do you make sure your own supply chain isn't full of fakes? According to a 2016 report by the European Union Intellectual Property Office and the Organization of Economic Cooperation, $461 billion in counterfeit goods moved through international trade in 2013. In a summer 2017 follow-up, the two organizations found that smugglers of counterfeit goods are using Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, and Singapore as their main global trading hubs. Four transit points — Albania, Egypt, Morocco, and Ukraine — are key to introducing fake goods into Europe, and Panama is an important transit point for US-bound counterfeit goods, according to the new report. Further, some 75 percent of those goods move by ocean container, the OECD and EUIPO found. In short, criminal networks have enormous opportunities to abuse this critical supply chain channel to transport huge volumes of counterfeit products affecting virtually every product sector. But companies that transport these goods are key intermediaries in stopping this flow of counterfeits, and brand owners and shipping industry interests have signed a declaration of intent aimed at preventing the maritime transport of counterfeit goods. This case study will bring together some of these companies to discuss how they are working together to stop the transport of counterfeit goods on container ships, the challenges they face, the steps they are taking to stop the criminal infiltration of the supply chain, and what more can be done collaboratively to stop the shipment of fake goods.

 
—Session Chair —
Sophie Peresson
Programme Director,
Business Action to Stop
Counterfeiting and Piracy

 

 — Panelists —
Steven McLoughlin
Manager,
Logistics,
Philip Morris International

 

Marcela Chacón
Director,
Public and Government Affairs for
Central America & the Caribbean,
Bayer

 

Neil Barber
Vice President,
Seafreight, Kuehne + Nagel AG

 
11:30 AM — 12:30 PM
 

Case Study:
The Value to BCOs From Real-Time Ocean ETA

Location: 104B

As the price of sensors drops steadily, a new world of cargo visibility is gradually opening up. Long beholden to error-prone carrier EDI feeds, shippers continue to cite poor cargo visibility as a significant pain point as well as an opportunity to make fundamental supply chain improvement. For example, what would a precise and timely Ocean ETA do for a BCO’s business? In recent cases, Savi and Panalpina partnered to deliver moment-to-moment visibility on non-reefer ocean shipments for leading shippers in the automotive, manufacturing, pharmaceutical and consumer sectors. With historical and real-time data on key lanes, BCOs learned new information on their supply chains, while Panalpina was able to support reduced transportation costs and improved customer satisfaction. Chuck McDaniel, an independent consultant who recently retired as global logistics manager for Procter & Gamble; Zac Yoffe, senior manager of product and supply chain security at Biogen; Nanette Efird, vice president of product for Savi; and Keith Hitchcock, vice president of consumer, retail and fashion for Panalpina, will discuss the journey to help BCOs improve competitiveness while deepening and improving relationships with important clients in some of the first uses of the power of IoT devices.

 
— Introduced by —
Peter Tirschwell
Senior Director, Content,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Panelists —
Nanette Efird
Vice President,
Product,
Savi Technologies

 

Chuck McDaniel
Consultant and Former Manager,
Global Logistics,
Procter & Gamble

 

Zachary Yoffe
Senior Manager,
Product and Supply Chain Security,
Biogen

 

Keith Hitchcock
Vice President,
Consumer,
Retail and Fashion,
Panalpina

 
12:30 — 2:00 PM
 

Lunch with Speaker

“Bold and Clear Predictions”

Location: 104C

Author, consultant and former carrier executive Lars Jensen is one of the few individuals in the industry who consistently makes bold predictions for the future and more often than not is accurate. For example, at the 2014 TPM ,he predicted that carriers would increasingly favor cost control over schedule reliability, which is what happened. (In full year 2013, data known at the time of the prediction, Asia-US West Coast reliability was 84 percent. We are now at 69 percent). At the 2012 TPM, he predicted the consolidation of the major carriers and at the 2013 TPM he predicted the over-ordering of mega-vessels. At the 2015 TPM, he predicted the scenario of a carrier brought to a halt by losing all IT systems in a cyberattack. In this luncheon presentation following the Wednesday morning program, Jensen, most recently the author of the book "Liner Shipping 2025," will offer several new predictions, including: Out of the 100 largest container lines, how many will be left in 2020? And in 2025? And who will be the most likely survivors? How will COSCO become the world’s largest carrier, and what will the impact of this be on carriers, shippers and ports? The existing alliances will ultimately fail and be reshuffled. Why and what will the consequences be? Within 94 companies listed on the JOC’s Container Shipping Technology Matrix, which three will truly be catalysts for major change in the industry, why and how? What are the three most underappreciated (or ignored) growth drivers in the coming three years? What are the top three events in the next 24 months that will disrupt shippers' supply chains? Join Lars for what will surely be a thought-provoking and controversial presentation.

 
— Introduced by —
Bill Mongelluzzo
Senior Editor,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

 

— Featured Speaker —
Lars Jensen
CEO and Partner,
SeaIntelligence Consulting

 


 
2:30 — 4:00 PM
 

Long Beach Port Tour

Location: Dock #9, outside Parker’s Lighthouse, Shoreline Village

The Port of Long Beach cordially invites TPM attendees to join a 90-minute harbor cruise that will tour many of the port facilities. The cruise will depart from Dock #9, just outside of Parker’s Lighthouse in Shoreline Village in downtown Long Beach and will last approximately 90 minutes. The tour will offer a close-up look at the many container terminals, on-dock rail yards, and diverse mix of cargo that makes the Port of Long Beach a world leader in goods movement. TPM attendees may use this opportunity to discuss with port representatives how the current and future challenges of trade growth are being handled at the Port of Long Beach.

THIS EVENT HAS SOLD OUT

 
 

 STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY:All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.